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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Shelley Price-Williams, Pietro Sasso and Roger “Mitch” Nasser Jr

The origin of the learning community, in higher education in the US, began over a century ago. In contemporary higher education, living-learning communities (LLCs) have…

Abstract

The origin of the learning community, in higher education in the US, began over a century ago. In contemporary higher education, living-learning communities (LLCs) have become a strategic way to foster student development, engagement, and success as well to advance key tenets of diversity and inclusion. Within this work, a historical narrative of the learning community is provided, in addition to a discussion of relative student development theory. Finally, this chapter positions diversity and inclusion as central to this educational intervention and frames the utility of this student engagement model within the Dynamic Student Development Metatheodel, a modern theory of student success and development.

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Strategies for Facilitating Inclusive Campuses in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Equity and Inclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-065-9

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2020

Jan Lees, Rex Haigh, Simone Bruschetta, Anando Chatterji, Veronica Dominguez-Bailey, Sandra Kelly, Aldo Lombardo, Shama Parkhe, Joāo G. Pereira, Yousuf Rahimi and Barbara Rawlings

This paper aims to describe a method of training for practitioners in democratic Therapeutic Communities (TCs) which has been used in several settings across the world…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a method of training for practitioners in democratic Therapeutic Communities (TCs) which has been used in several settings across the world over the past 25 years: the “Living-Learning Experience” (LLE) workshop. It goes on to consider the cross-cultural implications of the work.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the experience of running exactly the same programme in different countries and cultures, the paper examines the cross-cultural adaptability and describes necessary adaptations for local circumstances. It also contains original ethnographic research in UK and Italy; further study is planned for other countries.

Findings

The workshops are readily transferable to different cultures and are appreciated for their democratic and relational way of working.

Research limitations/implications

The ethnographic study examines the workshops in some depth, in UK and Italy, and could usefully be replicated in other countries. No quantitative, outcome or follow-up studies have yet been done, and this paper could contribute to the design of useful quantitative studies.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates that the LLE is a useful experiential learning tool in widely different settings. It could be developed in different ways, such as for developing relational practice or establishing therapeutic environments in different settings.

Social implications

The workshops' acceptance in widely different cultures indicates that the open and non-didactic format addresses essential and fundamental qualities required for therapeutic engagement and human relatedness.

Originality/value

This is the first description of the principles of democratic TCs being applied across different international settings. Its value extends beyond the TC field, to the use of democratic and relational principles' applicability in therapeutic pedagogy and training.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Jan Lees, Rex Haigh, Aldo Lombardo and Barbara Rawlings

– The purpose of this paper is to describe transient therapeutic communities (TCs) and their value for training.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe transient therapeutic communities (TCs) and their value for training.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a descriptive account which includes the findings of two field study evaluations, and direct participant feedback. It is an exploration of the application of TC and group analytic theory to transient TCs.

Findings

The transient TC format is an excellent training format for creating a powerful and effective environment for learning and personal development in the very short time frame of three days.

Practical implications

These courses are a very efficient and effective way of promoting reflective practice, enabling environments, and emotionally safe working practices. The trainings are useful for a wide range of people from mental health professions, those working in human resources, and those in senior positions in industrial, commercial and public sector fields.

Social implications

This paper will raise awareness that target-driven training is insufficient to improve quality of services beyond a certain point. A relational focus of training is needed to deal with issues of complexity which cannot be resolved by simple managerial methods. This experiential training can help to meet the need for inculcating compassion, kindness, and empathy in its participants.

Originality/value

Although other psychotherapy and group relations courses exist, and are used beyond the mental health field, the focus on generating an experience of belonging, emotional safety and democratic empowerment in the relational field of the course itself – by use of TC methodology – is novel, and could be of considerable value more widely.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Trudi Jacobson, John Delano, Linda Krzykowski, Laurie Garafola, Meghan Nyman and Holly Barker-Flynn

This paper aims to describe a multifaceted campus-wide initiative to retain transfer students that was undertaken when it was recognized that their retention rates were…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a multifaceted campus-wide initiative to retain transfer students that was undertaken when it was recognized that their retention rates were lower than those of first-time, full-time students.

Design/methodology/approach

The Enhancing Student Experience (ESE) Working Group at the University at Albany (UAlbany) brought together key parties from Student Affairs and academic units, including the University Libraries, and provided an energizing arena in which existing student engagement and retention endeavors were discussed and coordinated, and new initiatives were inspired.

Findings

This paper reflects the work of a subcommittee of the ESE group that focused on developing strategies to increase the retention rate of students who transferred to UAlbany, and identifying characteristics of those first-time, full-time students who transferred from UAlbany. The efforts discussed in this paper, which were guided by professional experiences, institutional data and published reports, resulted in a 2 per cent increase in the student retention rate in the past two years.

Research limitations/implications

The data collection and analysis, and the initiatives, are specific to one public research university.

Practical implications

Initiatives undertaken to address the retention of transfer students have begun to have an impact.

Originality/value

The “all-hands-on-deck” approach described in this paper demonstrates how strategic collaborations among the many institutional stakeholders at a public research university were marshalled to have a significant and positive impact on student retention.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Aldo Lombardo and Rex Haigh

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the training value of a residential “enabling environments” (LLEE) workshop in relation to the Royal College of Psychiatrists…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the training value of a residential “enabling environments” (LLEE) workshop in relation to the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ (RCPsych) ten specified standards, as rated by workshop participants.

Design/methodology/approach

A 34 question yes/no/na questionnaire was drawn up, derived from the ten value-based standards and criteria which need to be met for the enabling environment (EE) award by the RCPsych’s Centre for Quality Improvement (Table AI). It was administered after six residential workshops, in Italy and UK, to 99 participants. Results were analysed for each of the six workshops, and for each of the ten standards, to show the degree to which participants recognised whether the standards were met.

Findings

High rates of positive responses were recorded with little variation across the six workshops sampled. Some standards and criteria showed higher levels of positive responses, and some showed slightly higher scores for “not applicable”.

Practical implications

Experiential Living-Learning Experience (LLE) workshops provide a valid training experience for those developing or working in EEs.

Social implications

Value-based standards can only be fully understood by direct experience of them, as verbal or written explanations fail to convey the psychological impact of the experience.

Originality/value

The questionnaire and its translation is the original work of AL. RH is the founder of LLE training workshops and the EE award.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Laura Aslan

Therapeutic communities (TC’s) are consciously designed, living-learning environments designed to evoke social, psychological and behavioural change. The success of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Therapeutic communities (TC’s) are consciously designed, living-learning environments designed to evoke social, psychological and behavioural change. The success of the residential TC model saw these community-led, self-help environments for addicts move into custodial settings and early evidence suggests this transition was effective. The purpose of this paper is to examine the evidence relevant to the effectiveness of prison based, drug-free TCs.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to establish their true efficiency, particular focus has been placed on studies conducted over the last ten years (2007-2017).

Findings

To date, the TC remains superior to other forms of drug treatment in reducing recidivism and drug relapse amongst addicts who offend.

Originality/value

Outcomes of this review highlighted the importance of aftercare in providing transitional support; a fundamental aspect of treatment necessary for success and for maintaining long-term recovery post release.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Barbara Rawlings

The purpose of this paper is to compare and evaluate three experiential training workshops, each set up as three-day transient therapeutic communities, and established to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare and evaluate three experiential training workshops, each set up as three-day transient therapeutic communities, and established to train therapeutic community staff.

Design/methodology/approach

The author carried out participant observation of all courses and analysed these using thematic analysis. The description is provided in Part 1 of the paper. The evaluation, in Part 2 was based on written feedback from participants and from assessment against relevant audit criteria.

Findings

All three workshops achieved their aims of providing participants with an authentic TC resident’s experience. Additionally, each offered personal understandings of how participants felt and why they felt that way in the community setting.

Research limitations/implications

This was largely a piece of qualitative research, carried out in the field, to achieve depth of description and understanding rather than statistical outcomes. Some numerical scores were derived from feedback forms. Further analysis of feedback from future workshops will strengthen findings by increasing the numbers of respondents.

Practical implications

The workshops should continue largely as they are, although there may be some small changes to the designs. They achieve the aim of advancing the understanding of TC staff members.

Originality/value

The paper is based on three earlier unpublished reports and is new published research of interest to trainers in the fields of mental health and experiential learning.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Steve Pearce and Oliver Dale

Training in therapeutic community and related approaches has not been widely available, and there is debate about the form this should take. This has had a negative impact…

Abstract

Purpose

Training in therapeutic community and related approaches has not been widely available, and there is debate about the form this should take. This has had a negative impact on the field. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors consider the history of training in democratic therapeutic community methods in the UK in particular, and trace some of the reasons for its lack of development.

Findings

With the expansion of TC methodology into new areas, such as therapeutic and enabling environments, the ability to provide training in DTC approaches and techniques is increasingly important. The developing evidence base, and the increasing detail in which the method has been described, make dedicated TC training increasingly important.

Originality/value

Training in therapeutic community methods, and enabling and therapeutic environment approaches, provides a grounding in technique and theory that would otherwise be impossible to acquire for most workers, and can lead to a general increase in the level of competence and confidence in the way these environments operate.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Abstract

Details

Transformative Leadership in Action: Allyship, Advocacy & Activism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-520-7

Abstract

Details

Followership in Action
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-947-3

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