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Article

Eva Ellström, Bodil Ekholm and Per‐Erik Ellström

The purpose of this paper is to first elaborate on the notion of a learning environment based on an empirical study of care work. Second, to explore how aspects of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to first elaborate on the notion of a learning environment based on an empirical study of care work. Second, to explore how aspects of a learning environment may differ between and within units in the same organization, and how to understand and explain such differences.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was based on a multiple case‐study design including four departments within two care units. Data were collected through direct observation of working conditions and work practices as well as semi‐structured interviews with all care‐workers within the two units (29 persons), and with the head and deputy head for each of the two units.

Findings

It was possible to distinguish between two qualitatively different patterns of working conditions and practices within the four teams. These patterns of practice were interpreted as representing an enabling and a constraining type of learning environment as these concepts were defined in this study. The evidence suggests that the emergence of an enabling learning environment was an outcome of a dynamic interplay between a number of factors that had the character of a virtuous circle.

Originality/value

The article adds to previous research through a distinction between two types of learning environment (enabling and constraining), and by linking these two types of learning environment to different conceptions of learning and to different working conditions and practices.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Joseph Ikechukwu Uduji, Elda Nduka Okolo-Obasi and Simplice Anutecia Asongu

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the impact of a growth enhancement support scheme (GESS) on the enabling environment of smallholder farmers in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the impact of a growth enhancement support scheme (GESS) on the enabling environment of smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa. The main aim is to investigate the impact of the GESS on access to rural farm credit and the transport cost of smallholder farmers in the agricultural transformation agenda (ATA) in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a survey research technique, aimed at gathering information from a representative sample of the population, as it is essentially cross-sectional, describing and interpreting the current situation. A total of 1,200 were sampled across the six geopolitical zones of Nigeria.

Findings

The results from the use of a double-hurdle model indicate that the GESS has a significant impact on farmers’ access to credit, but does not significantly impact on rural farm transport cost, which subsequently influences the price of food in the country.

Practical implications

This implies that if the Federal Government of Nigeria is to work toward an ideal agricultural transformation agenda, transport networks should be closely aligned with the GESS priorities to provide connectivity to rural areas that provide most of the country’s agricultural output.

Originality/value

This research adds to the literature on the agricultural and rural development debate in developing countries. It concludes that embracing a rural finance and transportation infrastructure should form the foundation of the ATA in Nigeria, which, in turn, would provide a conducive environment for a more widespread rural economy in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Article

Boris Urban and Zethu Dlamini

Public policy supported by effective institutions is one of the key strategies for promoting entrepreneurial activities. However, the problem is that an enabling

Abstract

Purpose

Public policy supported by effective institutions is one of the key strategies for promoting entrepreneurial activities. However, the problem is that an enabling environment that supports entrepreneurship is often lacking in several African countries. The aim of this article is to deepen our understanding of the mix of policy and institutional factors which create an enabling environment for enterprise growth in Swaziland.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data are sourced from 200 enterprises across Swaziland's main regions and hypotheses are statistically tested using correlational and regression analyses.

Findings

Results show that a mix of different institutional and state support factors such as access to markets, education and training, access to finance, contract enforcement, regulations and business support programmes all have a significant and positive impact on enterprise growth.

Research limitations/implications

Study implications relate to the need for specific and targeted policy interventions required to foster an enabling environment in order to stimulate enterprise growth in Swaziland.

Originality/value

Empirical investigations on enterprise growth in under-researched developing market contexts, such as Swaziland, are important since in many developing and emerging markets small enterprises are at the epicentre of the economy Moreover, this study adds to the stream of research highlighting that the application of institutional theory provides a detailed theoretical understanding of the actors and the process by which enterprise policy is formulated.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

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Article

Robin Johnson and Rex Haigh

A ‘psychologically informed environment’, or PIE, is the first of many new concepts that have spun off from the Royal College of Psychiatrists' Enabling Environments (EE…

Abstract

A ‘psychologically informed environment’, or PIE, is the first of many new concepts that have spun off from the Royal College of Psychiatrists' Enabling Environments (EE) initiative. Based on the early developments in the therapeutic community movement, and adapting these values and principle to the 21st century world of community mental health, the EE initiative attempts to identify the key features in any setting that fosters a sense of connected belonging; and suggests a process by which these principles can then be customised for specific settings. The implications for a new social psychiatry at the heart of any future public mental health and social policy are clear; and to be pursued further in the final paper in this trilogy.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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Article

Henrik Kock and Per‐Erik Ellström

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding of the relationships among the workplace as a learning environment, strategies for competence development used by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding of the relationships among the workplace as a learning environment, strategies for competence development used by SMEs and learning outcomes. Specifically, there is a focus on a distinction between formal and integrated strategies for competence development, the conditions under which these strategies are likely to be used, and their effects in terms of individual learning outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was based mainly on questionnaire data collected through a survey of 14 SMEs that had received support from the European Social Fund's Objective 3 programme. In addition, data collected through interviews and analyses of documents were used.

Findings

The results indicate interactions between the strategy of competence development used by the firms (formal vs integrated) and the type of learning environment in the workplace (constraining vs enabling). The use of an integrated strategy in an enabling learning environment was the most successful combination in terms of learning outcomes, while the use of an integrated strategy in a constraining learning environment was the least successful combination.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to elaborate the theoretical and empirical basis of the distinction between formal and integrated strategies for competence development, and to study the effects of the two types of strategy, not only for individual learning outcomes, but also for effects at an organisational level.

Practical implications

HRD practitioners need to question a traditional reliance on formal training, as the presented results indicate the importance of using competence development strategies that are based on an integration of formal and informal learning.

Originality/value

The study indicates that the effects of competence development efforts are likely to be a function not only, nor primarily, of the training methods and strategies that are used, but also of the characteristics of the learning environment of the workplace.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article

Catherine Bridge and Phillippa Carnemolla

The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications of socially inclusive Building Information Modelling (BIM) library components. BIM requires and integrates many…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications of socially inclusive Building Information Modelling (BIM) library components. BIM requires and integrates many sets of predefined blocks or collection of attributes. Any one of the individual blocks can be replicated and/or stored in a block library for later reuse. However, few if any current block libraries contain or have access to the blocks that enable social inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

An action-based research methodology was used to design, develop and deploy three enabling blocks as part of a plan to develop a larger library of tools for BIM practitioners. The Enabling Block Library is an open access library of Australian code-compliant mobility elements published online. This paper discusses the design and development of the library components in detail, explaining how each of the three blocks was selected in our pilot evaluation and how each was identified; fact-checked; planned (designed); deployed (action); and then evaluated.

Findings

The process and evaluation highlights that appropriate code-compliant design tools can support greater social inclusion aspects of a built environment project. These are tools that are relevant to the full spectrum of industry users of BIM, including designers, engineers and certifiers.

Research limitations/implications

Because this paper documents the project while in an early launch phase, with a small number of launch blocks, the research results were limited in their ability to thoroughly measure industry or educational impact. However, the results showed how a socially inclusive BIM block library can be developed and why this is important, with literature supporting the potential of its dissemination to the design and construction industry.

Originality/value

The paper applied action-based research methodology in the development, deployment and evaluation of exploratory BIM use to create more socially inclusive environments. It is of value because it facilitates designers creating the optimum of performance-based accessible environments, rather than the minimum “deemed to satisfy” Building Codes.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article

Rex Haigh, Tom Harrison, Robin Johnson, Sarah Paget and Susan Williams

This paper aims to describe the origins of the concept of a psychologically informed environment (PIE), as now adopted and applied in homelessness resettlement, placing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the origins of the concept of a psychologically informed environment (PIE), as now adopted and applied in homelessness resettlement, placing this in the context of work recently carried out under the aegis of the Royal College of Psychiatrists' Centre for Quality Improvement to recognise and promote “enabling environments” in all areas of social practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper gives an historical account of the contemporary development of new thinking and practical applications for enhancing community mental health and well‐being.

Findings

The concept of an enabling environment (EE) arose out of efforts to up‐date for the twenty‐first century the post‐war concept of a therapeutic community, for all services working with the same basic core values and psycho‐social awareness. The EE approach now applies this framework more flexibly, yet with a clear operational focus in each sector, to a wider range of organisational contexts, social practice and agencies outside the therapy and care services world. From the outset, homelessness resettlement and social housing practice was seen as a key part of the overall ambition.

Practical implications

Understanding the values base behind social‐psychological approaches in social practice environments helps to translate these ideas into service‐led improvements in actual frontline services practice. In particular, the enabling environments approach offers a handy tool for self‐assessment and service improvement, which is fully compatible with the PIE's philosophy.

Originality/value

The concept of a PIE is currently acquiring momentum within homelessness resettlement work in the UK. In helping to establish the underlying values framework for psychologically‐informed services; and also provide tools for such services to use, this paper makes a contribution to help inform developing practice.

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Article

Jennifer Marie Hadden, Susan Thomas, Lorna Jellicoe-Jones and Zoe Marsh

– The purpose of this paper is to explore staff and prisoner experiences of a newly implemented Personality Disorder Service (PDS) within a category B male establishment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore staff and prisoner experiences of a newly implemented Personality Disorder Service (PDS) within a category B male establishment.

Design/methodology/approach

A semi-structured interview was used to explore the experiences of seven male category B PDS prisoners and eight PDS members of staff (four National Health Service (NHS) clinical staff and four prison service staff) from a multi-disciplinary team (MDT). Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was completed.

Findings

Prisoner sample: one overarching theme “environment” organised two themes: “enabling factors” and “disabling factors” which had a subtheme “integrating men who have sexually offended onto the unit”. Another theme “opportunities for self-development” was identified. Staff sample: an overarching theme “environment” organised two themes: “enabling factors” and “disabling factors”. An overarching theme “multi-disciplinary working” organised two themes: “working in partnership” and “cultural differences in working practices”. Two further themes were: “professional development” and “stressors”.

Research limitations/implications

This study focused on a small sample of staff and prisoners and their experiences of a newly implemented PDS. In addition, both staff and prisoners volunteered to take part in the study, and therefore may not be a representative sample. Consequently the results cannot be generalised to other establishments or PD services.

Practical implications

Staff and prisoner experiences indicate that a multi-disciplinary approach to personality disorder services is desirable and can be effective. Prisoners are gaining experiences of positive therapeutic relationships with staff and hope that their experiences of the PDS will reduce their risk of reoffending. Staff experiences indicate that the integration of two services presents challenges and that they are working to overcome these. It may be advantageous for the impact of cultural differences within a MDT to be explored further.

Originality/value

This is the first study that explores the experiences of the MDT and prisoners of the newly implemented PDS. The PDS forms part of the new development under the National Offender personality disorder pathway.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Article

Yunping Liang and Baabak Ashuri

In classical perspective, projects under a certain size are not feasible for P3. However, there is an emerging trend on using P3 to deliver projects which are frequently…

Abstract

Purpose

In classical perspective, projects under a certain size are not feasible for P3. However, there is an emerging trend on using P3 to deliver projects which are frequently at small- to medium- size to meet ever-increasingly complex social needs, including enhancing lifecycle performance of existing facilities, designing and building for resilience and sustainability, ensuring cost effectiveness of public spending and fostering innovation. In contrast with the increasing implementation, small and medium P3s, especially those in the United States, receive little attention in existing studies. This study aims at answering the question: in the context of US, what features of those small- to medium- sized P3s with success records enable the selection of P3 as delivery method.

Design/methodology/approach

By critically reviewing the literature, this study synthesizes and discusses the challenges in classical perspective. The authors use a framework drawn from the transaction cost to propose two types of enabling features that could contribute to the success of small and medium P3s. The proposed enabling features are supported by case study of twelve identified small- to medium- sized P3s which have reached financial closure as of 2018 in the United States.

Findings

The results show how the identified enabling opportunities have been used in these cases to enhance the viability of the P3 model in the infrastructure market. The two types of features are high tolerance enabler explained by the expectations on indirect and non-monetary compensations, and cost reduction enablers including: (1) being in the sectors with well-established traditions on using private investments; (2) having developers with expertise on infrastructure finance; (3) being in the jurisdictions with favorable legislative environment and (4) having less-uncertain future project revenue.

Originality/value

This study, for the first time, critically examines the enabling features of the P3 model for delivering small and medium infrastructure projects in the United States. This research sheds light on the credibility and viability of small- to medium- sized P3 and increases the confidence in policy makers to promote this model.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Mastering Digital Transformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-465-2

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