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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Tammy Ivins and Rachel Mulvihill

The purpose of this paper was to ask librarian Rachel Mulvihill (Head of Teaching and Engagement) and colleagues at University of Central Florida libraries about the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to ask librarian Rachel Mulvihill (Head of Teaching and Engagement) and colleagues at University of Central Florida libraries about the Foundations of Excellence Transfer Initiative, an extensive, university-wide self-study program examining their transfer student needs for success and retention. University librarians participated in Foundational Dimensions groups in the first year of the program and with action groups in the second year.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an interview.

Findings

Participation in campus-wide initiatives to reach transfer students improved the libraries’ image in the university system, strengthened inter-department connections and supported the success of transfer students. Developing personal connections with transfer students and understanding your school’s transfer population needs and dialogues with feeder school can help libraries better support their student populations.

Originality/value

The integration of library staff into a system-wide transfer-student assessment program is rare, if not unique.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2014

Dennis Schmidt and Martha Wartick

This chapter reports the results of a study of student performance in upper-level accounting courses, especially intermediate accounting I and cost accounting. Of…

Abstract

This chapter reports the results of a study of student performance in upper-level accounting courses, especially intermediate accounting I and cost accounting. Of particular interest is the performance of students who transferred the introductory accounting courses from a two-year institution versus native four-year students. We found that after controlling for a number of aptitudinal and demographic variables, transfer students performed at a significantly lower level than native students. On average, the difference was about 0.8 of a grade point. This study also provides evidence of grade inflation at two-year institutions relative to our four-year institution; documents a mean lag time of more than two years for community college students between taking principles of accounting courses and the upper-level courses; and shows that although the transfer shock lessens as the students continue in the major, it does not disappear. We also discuss the implications of our findings.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-840-2

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Hossein Nouri and Maria S. Domingo

Female students comprise a significant number of the accounting student population at four-year institutions. Likewise, a significant number of students have chosen to…

Abstract

Female students comprise a significant number of the accounting student population at four-year institutions. Likewise, a significant number of students have chosen to enroll and earn associate degrees at a community college, and subsequently transfer to a four-year college or university. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, more than half of the students enrolled in two-year institutions were female. Moreover, 57% of college students in the United States are females. This study provides empirical evidence on the interaction between gender and transfer versus native accounting students in their academic performance during and after shock periods. According to the literature, the shock period includes two semesters after a two-year college student transfers to a four-year college. The results of this study indicate that female and male transfer students do not perform equally in their accounting courses compared to their native counterparts, that is, male transfer students in accounting performed worse than female transfer students and native students (male and female) both during and after the “shock” period. These findings may have practical implications for administrators and accounting departments since male transfer students appear to need more assistance to absorb transfer shock when they join four-year colleges and possibly even after their first year at the four-year institution.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-394-5

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Prateek Basavaraj, Ivan Garibay and Ozlem Ozmen Garibay

Postsecondary institutions use metrics such as student retention and college completion rates to measure student success. Multiple factors affect the success of first time…

Abstract

Purpose

Postsecondary institutions use metrics such as student retention and college completion rates to measure student success. Multiple factors affect the success of first time in college (FTIC) and transfer students. Transfer student success rates are significantly low, with most transfer students nationwide failing to complete their degrees in four-year institutions. The purpose of this study is to better understand the degree progression patterns of both student types in two undergraduate science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs: computer science (CS) and information technology (IT). Recommendations concerning academic advising are discussed to improve transfer student success.

Design/methodology/approach

This study describes how transfer student success can be improved by thoroughly analyzing their degree progression patterns. This study uses institutional data from a public university in the United States. Specifically, this study utilizes the data of FTIC and transfer students enrolled in CS and IT programs at the targeted university to understand their degree progression patterns and analyzes the program curricula using network science curricular analytics method to determine what courses in the curriculum require more assistance to retain students.

Findings

The major findings of this study are: (1) students’ degree mobility patterns within an institution differ significantly between transfer and FTIC students; (2) some similarities exist between the CS and IT programs in terms of transfer students' degree mobility patterns; (3) transfer students' performance in basic and intermediate level core courses contribute to differences in transfer students' mobility patterns.

Originality/value

This study introduces the concept of “mobility patterns” and examines student degree mobility patterns of both FTIC and transfer students in a large public university to improve the advising process for transfer students regarding courses and identifying secondary majors.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Susan Poch

The purpose of this paper is to examine how transfer students interact with a higher education setting that is reacting to new state‐mandated accountability goals, and to…

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2013

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how transfer students interact with a higher education setting that is reacting to new state‐mandated accountability goals, and to understand higher education institutions and their environments when faced with new accountability measures. The larger purpose of the study is to develop a grounded theory that helps all players understand the tensions that exist between the state, the universities, and transfer students.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a qualitative study using Bronfenbrenner's ecological theory.

Findings

The paper finds that interactions between the systems played a large role in the transfer students' perceptions of their experiences at a four‐year institution. The universities in this study, and their transfer student policies, reflect an environment that was influenced by and influenced transfer students' perceptions.

Research limitations/implications

To date no research has been found that incorporates the ecological model and higher education institutions. Because of this, it is difficult to determine how effective this model may be for institutions that are wrestling with dilemmas.

Originality/value

The ecological theory used in this qualitative study is a useful tool in understanding the contexts and systems in which transfer students, administrators and state‐mandated accountability goals co‐exist.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Min Tong and Carrie Moran

The purpose of this study was to assess the information literacy proficiency of transfer students. This assessment of skills was undertaken to improve the services…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to assess the information literacy proficiency of transfer students. This assessment of skills was undertaken to improve the services provided to transfer students in academic libraries, with a particular focus on information literacy instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

The Project Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (SAILS) test was administered to assess the information literacy proficiency of a cohort of undergraduate students taking courses on two regional campuses of a four-year institution. In total, 114 students participated, and SAILS test scores were compared to several demographic characteristics using one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Findings

Results showed that undergraduate students generally lack information literacy skills, even at the junior and senior levels. Previous library instruction had a positive impact on scores for two of the Association of College and Research Libraries information literacy standards, suggesting that library instruction programs can be effective at improving these skills. When examining performance across the board on the various information literacy skills, there was no significant difference between transfer and native students in this result set.

Research limitations/implications

This study had a limited sample size, and only tested students taking courses from two regional campus locations. Follow-up studies could broaden the scope to include main campus transfer students to form a larger sample size.

Originality/value

It was difficult to find original research within the library literature that directly addressed information literacy skills in a mixed population of transfer and native students. Further research in this area can serve to improve the services offered to all students within academic libraries.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Helene Lafrance and Shannon B. Kealey

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the planning, implementation and assessment of a personal librarian (PL) program for transfer students at a four-year private…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the planning, implementation and assessment of a personal librarian (PL) program for transfer students at a four-year private university. It highlights best practices to ensure the success of such a program, emphasizes the importance of collaboration with other campus units and explores the possible applications for other underserved student populations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explains why the PL model is particularly appropriate to serve the needs of transfer students. It clearly describes the assessment methods to evaluate such a program and proposes best practices to ensure success and sustainability.

Findings

Transfer students respond very positively to a PL program as shown by the number of interactions they have with their PLs and their responses to a survey. Librarians also appreciate the chance to develop meaningful relationships with students despite the addition to their workload.

Practical implications

Institutions looking at ways to reach out to transfer students or other underserved populations can easily adapt the PL program described here.

Originality/value

The PL concept is not new but, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, it is the first time it has been applied to transfer students. The program described here is also unique because of its “boutique” approach, which emphasizes customization and personalization.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Anna Sandelli

The aim of this paper is to examine literature related to transfer students and students in transition through three interrelated lenses: student demographics and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine literature related to transfer students and students in transition through three interrelated lenses: student demographics and experiences, considerations encountered by institutions of higher education working to support these students and academic libraries’ interactions with this growing population.

Design/methodology/approach

Library and information science and education databases were searched for articles related to transfer student experiences and initiatives. Educational research and policy centers were also investigated for supplemental data and definitions.

Findings

Several key considerations for academic libraries interested in supporting transfer students emerged, including the growth and diversity of this population; academic, social and procedural experiences encountered during and after students’ transition; commonalities and differences with native first-year students; and the value of partnerships in fostering student success.

Practical implications

This review contextualizes conversations regarding transfer student experiences, providing a resource for librarians to understand this population from multiple perspectives and to use these perspectives to develop and enhance initiatives, resources and services.

Originality/value

Despite an increased emphasis on transfer students across higher education, there is little literature regarding libraries’ involvement with this population. This literature review also seeks to expand upon existing conversations by examining transfer student experiences beyond the library that could inform both their interactions with the library and the ways in which libraries connect and communicate with these students.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Jennifer Percival, Maurice DiGiuseppe, Bill Goodman, Ann LeSage, Fabiola Longo, Arlene De La Rocha, Ron Hinch, John Samis, Otto Sanchez, Anna Augusto Rodrigues and Phil Raby

The purpose of this paper is to explore not only the academic measures such as grade point average of success of college-to-university transfer programs (Pathway…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore not only the academic measures such as grade point average of success of college-to-university transfer programs (Pathway Programs), but also the social-cultural facilitators and barriers throughout the students’ Pathway experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The experience of students and academic advisors moving between Queensdale College and North Star University (NSU) (pseudonyms) were analyzed using a mixed-methods approach including analysis of data from online surveys, secondary data (course performance), and focus group interviews.

Findings

Students who are able to enter the Pathway Programs at NSU perform on average better than their four-year traditional program peers. There remain a number of social-cultural barrier which need to be addressed to improve the overall experience of these transfer students.

Practical implications

The results from this study will assist the administrative decision makers in designing Pathways and their associated communication plans in order to meet the needs of the students with tools and supports that are both perceived by the students as valuable and are improving their Pathway experience and ultimately their academic performance.

Originality/value

The move to develop Pathway Programs in Ontario is a new phenomenon, even in provinces where this is more common, few studies exist which consider the social-cultural aspects of the student journey between the two institutions. This study moves beyond the standard academic performance data and provides insight into the critical role played by the social aspects in higher education experiences.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Karen Stanley Grigg and Jenny Dale

The purpose of this paper is to determine the information literacy skills and needs of incoming and current transfer students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the information literacy skills and needs of incoming and current transfer students.

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies are discussed, two of which were generated from ACRL’s Assessment in Action program. In the first, incoming transfer students were asked basic demographic questions and were tested on several basic information literacy skills. A combination of quantitative analysis and rubrics was used to assess results. A pre-test, post-test method was used in a basic introduction to campus life course for transfer students. Finally, the 2014 cohort of transfer student were resurveyed to test research skills and report interactions they had with reference librarians and library instruction during the previous year.

Findings

Initial observations suggested older transfer students, and students transferring from community colleges were least knowledgeable about basic information literacy concepts, and that students who had attended library instruction sessions were more knowledgeable. In the pre-test, intervention and post-test study, students did not show significant improvements in knowledge, but did show a significantly improved comfort level with library research. In the follow-up survey, second year transfer students who had library instruction during the previous year were significantly more likely to have sought out their subject liaison for consultations.

Originality/value

Research studies that focus on the information literacy needs and skills of transfer students and adult learners is somewhat scarce, compared to that of incoming freshmen. It is of use to both academic librarians in institutions that accept incoming transfer students, and to community college librarians who may be designing handoff library instruction.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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