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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Marilyn McDougall and Rona S. Beattie

Quality circles, project teams, autonomous work groups, andself‐managed teams are very much a part of organizational life intoday′s competitive and constantly changing…

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1733

Abstract

Quality circles, project teams, autonomous work groups, and self‐managed teams are very much a part of organizational life in today′s competitive and constantly changing work environment. Considers the issues in developing groups as a focus for learning for individuals and the organization as a whole. Reports on a two‐year project evaluating the processes and outcomes of learning groups, and suggests that lessons learned from this project can be applied to help maximize learning and performance in groups in a wide range of organizational contexts. Presents outcomes regarding effective group selection, learning achievements and group processes. Draws conclusions and highlights key issues.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 14 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2006

Manuel London and Valerie I. Sessa

Students of organizations are beginning to recognize the importance of continuous learning in organizations, but to date the concept is not well understood, particularly…

Abstract

Students of organizations are beginning to recognize the importance of continuous learning in organizations, but to date the concept is not well understood, particularly in terms of how the learning of individuals is related to the learning that takes place in groups, which is related to the learning that occurs in organizations (and all other combinations). To further our understanding, we offer the idea of continuous learning in organizations from a living system's perspective. We view individuals, groups, and organizations as living systems nested in a hierarchy. We propose that living systems can learn in three ways: they can adapt, they can generate, and they can transform. Learning triggers from the environment spark learning, and this relationship is moderated by the system's readiness to learn. Readiness to learn is a function of the permeability of the system's boundaries, the system's stage of development, and the system's meta-systems perspective. Additional research questions are presented to explore learning flow between levels and to determine how the match between one system's pressure for change and another system's readiness to learn affects the emergence of adaptive, generative, and transformative learning. In addition, research questions are offered as a means to test these ideas and build grounded theory. Finally, using this model, the chapter presents three case studies and suggests diagnostic questions to analyze and facilitate continuous learning from a multi-level perspective.

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Multi-Level Issues in Social Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-432-4

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Lee Webster and Andrew Whitworth

Purpose – This chapter contributes to the development of informed learning pedagogy by examining its innately political character. Through examining issues of power that…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter contributes to the development of informed learning pedagogy by examining its innately political character. Through examining issues of power that arise in a particular educational setting, the aim is to illuminate how power (and resistance to it) needs to be carefully considered by practitioners who engage with informed learning pedagogy.

Theoretical Approach – Foucault’s view of power, defining it as something that can be both generative and repressive, and which works only in combination with resistance to this power, is specifically drawn on to illuminate how dialogues between students give rise to changed information practices.

Design – Twenty groups of learners, each of five to seven students, engaged in a series of three complex informed learning activities, and generated extensive datasets as they recorded their dialogues to online discussion boards within the Blackboard course management system used on a postgraduate course in educational technology. These data were supplemented by interviews with a number of students and the course tutor.

Findings – The information practices of the groups developed in different ways depending on a number of factors consistent with informed learning. Students were motivated by achieving high grades, and data reveal that students respond to surveillance from teaching staff and each other by communicating outside of the official discussion board space. This is illuminating because by resisting power in this way students develop new practices that are specifically relevant to their group, and shows how dominant power and resistance to it help develop facets of informed learning.

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Informed Learning Applications: Insights from Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-062-2

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2005

Stanley M. Gully and Jean M. Phillips

The purpose of this chapter is to extend research and theory on learning and performance orientations to multiple levels of analysis. We begin by introducing a model…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to extend research and theory on learning and performance orientations to multiple levels of analysis. We begin by introducing a model describing the impact of individual learning and performance orientations on attentional focus, response to failure, experimentation, and motivation, and identify potential sources of these orientations. We then describe how learning and performance orientations are linked to incremental and profound change, and theoretically based propositions are presented to guide future research efforts. Leadership, organizational learning, and strategic human resource management are discussed in relation to the model, and implications of the framework for future research and practice are revealed.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-215-3

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2020

Jittima Wongwuttiwat, Vasa Buraphadeja and Tanakom Tantontrakul

This case study aims to analyze and compare the learning achievements of two groups of university students taught by: traditional face-to-face learning (TDL) and blended e…

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to analyze and compare the learning achievements of two groups of university students taught by: traditional face-to-face learning (TDL) and blended e-learning (BEL). To the best of the authors’ knowledge no previous study of the use of BEL in the context of Thailand has addressed the same purpose as this study. It is expected that the findings from this study will suggest areas for additional research and will be of interest to researchers and professional educators, especially those involved in the development and use of BEL systems.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study compares two groups of undergraduate students who completed a course designed to develop skills in using productivity software at a university in Thailand. After establishing the groups, one group learned in a BEL environment and the other in a TDL environment. In particular, the online training and assessment software application SIMnet was used in the BEL environment. Comparisons between results using BEL and TDL are made for different assessment results. Additional analyses of results for the BEL group examined gender differences and correlations between the number of attempts made on assessments and the levels of achievement.

Findings

The findings indicated that for all of the assessments, the BEL group had a better performance than the TDL group. For the BEL group, additional analyses found no significant differences between the achievements of males and females and significant correlations between the numbers of attempts made on assessments and the results. Limitations of this case study are discussed, and the findings are expected to be of interest to researchers and professional educators, especially those involved in the development and use of BEL.

Research limitations/implications

Learning content was restricted to the Excel spreadsheet in which different areas of content need to be studied. The software SIMnet was used by the BEL group, additional BEL software needs to be studied. The participants’ characteristics – age, gender, culture and computer competency – were narrow scoped in which the study could include more varieties and also a larger sample size. Further studies should be designed to include more comparisons such a comparison between TDL group males and females.

Originality/value

The findings from this limited case study suggest that a BEL learning environment is superior to a TDL environment. Also, a BEL environment is equally beneficial for male and female students. In particular, the BEL feature, which allows students to retake assessments, leads to improved learning performance equally for both males and females. In general, these findings support those reported in previous studies.

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Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2007

Ray Webster and Fay Sudweeks

The purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamics of individual and group factors that facilitate successful collaborative work in e‐learning environments. The aim of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamics of individual and group factors that facilitate successful collaborative work in e‐learning environments. The aim of the paper is to develop a conceptual framework and a methodology for implementing the framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework is developed. The framework is an integration of two innovative methodologies (CEDA and RAPAD) which have been implemented in previous research.

Findings

The operationalisation of the integrated methodology enables the development of a learning environment by structured reflection and negotiation on preferred learning related characteristics.

Originality/value

The proposed approach facilitates student learning at the individual and group level. Extending the framework to training procedures locates the research to a broader societal context.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Qiang Jian

This paper aims to study the effects of digital flipped classroom teaching method integrated cooperative learning model on learning motivation and outcome. From the…

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1184

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the effects of digital flipped classroom teaching method integrated cooperative learning model on learning motivation and outcome. From the perspective of promoting students’ learning engagement, this study puts forward suggestions for the effective implementation of flipped classroom teaching, so as to provide reference for the implementation of flipped classroom teaching practice in colleges and universities. Along with the time change and promotion of 12-year compulsory education, traditional didactic instruction can no longer satisfy all students. The reform wave in education is therefore emerged in past years, where the “flipped classroom” model strikes a chord and becomes a trend.

Design/methodology/approach

By applying nonequivalent pretest posttest control group design to the experimental research, 242 college students in Henan Province are selected as subjects of study. They are divided into four groups. The first group adopts the flip classroom teaching method. The second group adopts the cooperative teaching method. The third group adopts the flipping classroom teaching method integrated the cooperative teaching method. The fourth group (control group) adopts the traditional teaching method. The study lasted 15 weeks with sessions carried out 3 h a week.

Findings

The research results show significant effects of flipped classroom teaching method on learning motivation, flipped classroom teaching method on learning outcome, cooperative learning on learning motivation, cooperative learning on learning outcome, flipped classroom teaching method integrated cooperative learning on the promotion of learning motivation and flipped classroom teaching method integrated cooperative learning on the promotion of learning outcome.

Research limitations/implications

First, on the basis of consulting the links of many teaching strategies and summarizing the experience of flipped classroom practice in famous universities, a series of teaching strategies is put forward. However, the pertinence of different subjects may be different, which requires teachers to focus on the specific practice of reference. Second, due to the limitation of time, the author spent more time and energy on the proposal part of strategy, and the scientific nature of the strategy is not verified in practice, so it needs to spend time and practice in the later stage to improve this work.

Practical implications

This topic is the integrated design practice and research of flipped classroom in current teaching. The practical significance of the research is to find a solution to the problem of low learning efficiency of students in traditional classrooms, so as to update teachers’ teaching concepts, change teaching methods and promote teaching behaviors. In flipped classroom, there is a systematic integrated design process before, during and after class, which can effectively improve teachers’ teaching design ability, help students change their learning methods and truly improve students’ learning efficiency and effectiveness. The research on the implementation of flipped classroom can enrich the theory of flipped classroom, including the research on the orientation of learning theory and the reorientation of the role of teachers and students. This study can provide theoretical support for the strategies and environment for the cultivation of students’ independent learning ability. The results of this study can provide a reference for improving the scientificity and diversity of research methods.

Originality/value

Based on the integrated design of flipped classroom before, during and after class, this research systematically explores the role of flipped classroom in cultivating students’ autonomous learning ability in the teaching of information science and technology, and studies how to maximize the role of flipped classroom in teaching to promote and help students’ learning. In addition, a special iterative method is adopted. In each round of research, according to the opinions of students and peers, the inadequacies and improvements in the last round of research is found, certain links are increased or decreased, and finally the research goals are achieved.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2007

Annika Lantz and Agneta Brav

What is required of job design and production planning, if they are to result in a work group taking a self‐starting approach and going beyond what is formally required of…

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6519

Abstract

Purpose

What is required of job design and production planning, if they are to result in a work group taking a self‐starting approach and going beyond what is formally required of it? This paper aims to contribute to group research by testing a theoretical model of relations between job design on the one hand (captured as completeness, demand on responsibility, demand on cooperation, cognitive demand, and learning opportunities), and reflexivity and learning processes within natural work groups in industry on the other hand.

Design/methodology/approach

The results are based on detailed task analyses and questionnaires from 40 work groups at the shop‐floor level in manufacturing industry in Sweden.

Findings

Job design and work routines show strong effects on reflexivity and learning processes. Four dimensions of job design – completeness, demand on cooperation, cognitive demand and learning opportunities – impact on reflexivity and learning processes. Job design correlates with social routines, and social routines with work routines.

Practical implications

It is crucial to create a job design that puts challenging demands on the group if group processes are to be characterized by reflexivity and learning. Managers have a challenging task to provide both a space and a climate that supports reflexivity and learning. All functions affected by production planning need to be involved in job design to balance conflicts between productivity and innovation.

Originality/value

Detailed task analysis is worthwhile as it captures aspects that are prerequisites for innovative groups not previously accounted for.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Valerie I. Sessa and Manuel London

The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe a model of group learning, examine variables that stimulate a group to learn and determine the group's readiness to learn

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2935

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe a model of group learning, examine variables that stimulate a group to learn and determine the group's readiness to learn, and provide suggested interventions to enhance group readiness to learn.

Design/methodology/approach

This practical paper, based on a model of group learning and recent group, learning, and systems literature, examines what triggers groups to learn and what makes groups ready to learn, and then suggest interventions to enhance group readiness to learn. Learning requires that the group recognizes variables that trigger learning. These may be pressures or opportunities from outside the group or encouragement and direction from group members. In addition, the group needs to be ready to learn when the triggers occur. Readiness to learn is a function of the group's maturity, boundary permeability, and learning orientation.

Findings

Based on a review of the literature and the model, the paper suggests ways to diagnose learning triggers and readiness and propose interventions to increase general readiness to learn as well as the group's readiness to learn as the group is forming, when the group makes progress, and as the group concludes its work. Finally, the paper presents a case to demonstrate learning triggers and the importance of readiness to learn.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an identified need by managers in organizations regarding understanding group learning, what triggers it, and how to enhance group readiness to learn and offers practical help to stimulating a group's readiness to learn.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Kenneth David Strang

Collaborative learning was examined as a pedagogy to determine if students could improve standardized exam scores when the professor led the sessions in class. The purpose…

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1522

Abstract

Purpose

Collaborative learning was examined as a pedagogy to determine if students could improve standardized exam scores when the professor led the sessions in class. The purpose of this paper is to design a quasi-experiment to test the predictive ability of this pedagogy using a randomly allocated treatment vs control group. An externally administered standardized exam was used as the instrument.

Design/methodology/approach

A post-positivist ideology was employed, quantitative data were collected from standardized exit exams scores and from the experiment factors. Descriptive statistics, correlation analysis along with a General Linear Model (GLM) ANCOVA were applied to test the hypothesis at the 95 percent confidence level.

Findings

A statistically significant model was developed using multiple regression in a Generalized Linear Model. The regression model developed in this study was able to capture 51 percent of variance on the exam score, using four predictors were (in order of importance): SAT, pedagogy, GPA, and gender.

Research limitations/implications

The GLM regression model proved that collaborative learning as pedagogy could increase standardized exam scores, since the only variation between the treatment vs control group was the pedagogy. Prior ability was still the most influential factor in the model, but when it was controlled for, pedagogy (collaborative learning) was shown to help students in the test group make a significant increase in exam score.

Practical implications

Business schools and other disciplines could apply the collaborative learning as a pedagogy to help students increase high-stakes exam scores, regardless of their gender, age, or prior ability. Several ideas were mentioned for replacing existing high-stakes exams.

Originality/value

A high degree of experimental control was imposed and the common predictors identified in the literature were tested to control for confounding influences. The researcher reflected on what really worked as techniques within the collaborative learning pedagogy process.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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