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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2018

Maxwell Okwudili Ede and Uwakwe Okereke Igbokwe

The purpose of this paper is fivefold: to identify the various results of previous empirical studies on the effect of mastery learning and students achievement in Nigeria…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is fivefold: to identify the various results of previous empirical studies on the effect of mastery learning and students achievement in Nigeria schools; determine the effect size for each of the studies examined; determine the mean effect size of the overall studies examined; find out the mean effect size of studies that examined the effect of gender on academic achievement in mastery learning strategy; and determine the mean effect size of studies that examined the effect of school locations on academic achievements using mastery learning strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted survey research design using the ex post facto procedure. This study being meta-analytical used already existing data (research results). The sample of research reports included both published and unpublished research reports on the effects of mastery learning on students’ academic achievements in Nigeria between 1980 and 2016. The study adopted a purposive sampling technique in selecting the sample. This was to ensure that studies: were centered on mastery learning and students’ academic achievements; were carried out in Nigeria; appeared in published and unpublished literature between 1980 and 2016; have the statistical values of the research results of each independent variable to be considered (e.g. t-test values, χ2 values and correlation values).

Findings

The study revealed that the mean effect size for all the studies was 0.536, indicating a positive mean effect size. The strategy, thus, has a significant effect on students’ achievements. School location, also, did not mediate in the use of the strategy.

Practical implications

Based on the findings of this study, the following recommendations were made: teachers should use this teaching strategy to enhance students’ achievements in difficult concepts in different subject areas. Since the result of this study has shown that the strategy has positive and large effect size, government and school proprietors should, with the collaboration of higher institutions concerned with teacher education, endeavor to organize seminars and workshops to serving teachers to enable them embrace effectively the principles and processes of implementing the strategy in the classroom. Since the result of this study has established the size of the effect of mastery learning strategy on the academic achievements, subsequent researchers should no longer direct their efforts in determining its effects on academic achievements but on the ways of improving the use of the strategy in teaching at all levels of education.

Originality/value

Available literature has shown that though most previous research findings revealed that mastery learning approach has an effect on academic achievements of students, no efforts have been made toward resolving the inconsistencies of those results by integrating them and establishing the extent of the effect of the strategy on academic achievements. This study, therefore, was designed to fill these gaps created by the non-existence of integrated studies on effects of mastery learning and academic achievements of students in Nigerian schools.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Anna Lövström, Johan Malmqvist and Constanta Olteanu

The aim of this study is to investigate achievement profiles in mathematics when integers are taught in a learning study in grade three (to children 8–9 years old) and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate achievement profiles in mathematics when integers are taught in a learning study in grade three (to children 8–9 years old) and to explore to what extent students with such profiles participate in inclusive teaching and learning practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a previous learning study are re-analysed, supported by a framework that enables the investigation of inclusive practices. In the present study, inclusion and achievement are viewed as interrelated, meaning that student achievement must be incorporated in the definition of inclusion. The analysis is based on documentation of a video-recorded lesson and on identical tests conducted before and after the lesson.

Findings

The general framing of the learning study indicates an inclusive practice, while pre- and post-test achievement together with data from the lesson reveal a mixed picture concerning student achievement and inclusion. The analysis of the pre- and post-test results for the 16 students in the class indicates considerable diversity in student achievement, resulting in four achievement profiles. The main conclusion is that some students gained from participating in the learning study lesson while others did not. The extensive analysis of four students' participation, one for each profile, shows that differences in student achievement are related to the extent to which students participate in inclusive teaching and learning practices.

Originality/value

While previous research on learning studies has mainly considered average student achievement, this study focuses on individual variation in achievement and the reasons for it, a matter largely neglected in previous learning study research.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2013

Dennis M. McInerney and Ronnel B. King

The aims of this study were (1) to examine the relationships among achievement goals, self-concept, learning strategies and self-regulation for post-secondary Indigenous…

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this study were (1) to examine the relationships among achievement goals, self-concept, learning strategies and self-regulation for post-secondary Indigenous Australian and Native American students and (2) to investigate whether the relationships among these key variables were similar or different for the two groups.

Methodology

Students from the two Indigenous groups answered questionnaires assessing the relevant variables. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to analyse the data. Structure-oriented analysis was used to compare the two groups in terms of the strengths of the pathways, while level-oriented analysis was used to compare mean level differences.

Findings

Self-concept was found to positively predict deep learning and self-regulated learning, and these effects were mediated by achievement goals. Students who pursued mastery and social goals had more positive educational outcomes. Both structure and level-oriented differences were found.

Research implications

Drawing on two distinct research traditions – self-concept and achievement goals – this study explored the synergies between these two perspectives and showed how the key constructs drawn from each framework were associated with successful learning.

Practical implications

To improve learning outcomes, interventions may need to target students’ self-concept, mastery-oriented and socially oriented motivations.

Social implications

Supporting Indigenous students in their post-secondary education is an imperative. Psychologists have important insights to offer that can help achieve this noble aim.

Originality/value of the chapter

Research on Indigenous students has mostly adopted a deficiency model. In contrast, this study takes an explicitly positive perspective on Indigenous student success by focusing on the active psychological ingredients that facilitate successful learning.

Details

Seeding Success in Indigenous Australian Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-686-6

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Wagdi Rashad Ali Bin-Hady and Abduljalil Nasr Hazaea

Existing research has examined English as a foreign language (EFL) students’ attitudes towards flipped learning. However, no study seems to have correlated students…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing research has examined English as a foreign language (EFL) students’ attitudes towards flipped learning. However, no study seems to have correlated students’ achievement and their attitudes towards flipped learning. Yemeni EFL students also face pronunciation problems and they lack technology-enhanced language learning. The flipped learning approach promotes active learning and increases students’ learning outcomes. This study aims to measure the achievement level and the attitudes of Yemeni EFL students towards flipped pronunciation classrooms. It also correlates between achievement and attitudes towards this new experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a correlational research design, quantitative and qualitative data were collected through a test, questionnaire and structured interview from an intact class of Yemeni EFL students at the College of Education in Socotra.

Findings

The one-sample t-test analysis shows that the respondents scored high in the achievement test. The analysis of both the questionnaire and the structured interview revealed that the students have a positive attitude towards the flipped pronunciation classroom. The correlation analysis indicated a high-level positive relationship between students’ achievement and their attitudes where r = 0.779 with p < 0.001, two-tailed.

Research limitations/implications

The present study has some limitations regarding the sample size. This context-specific study recruited the available EFL class at the College of Education in Socotra, Hadhramout University. It would be more reliable should the study compared large groups of students so that the results can be generalized.

Practical implications

The study recommends using flipped learning to enhance pronunciation among EFL students.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the correlational studies in flipped learning.

Details

PSU Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-1747

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2020

Sohni Siddiqui, Naureen Nazar Soomro and Martin Thomas

In this study, researchers applied blended learning program to investigate the success of a blended learning program on satisfaction of the psychological needs, and…

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Abstract

Purpose

In this study, researchers applied blended learning program to investigate the success of a blended learning program on satisfaction of the psychological needs, and academic achievement of chemistry students of O-Levels, following curriculum prescribed by University of Cambridge.

Design/methodology/approach

Research pattern is quantitative aligned with the quasi-experimental and pre-post experimental design which aimed at examining the efficiency of a motivational strategies adopted with the use of blended learning program on psychological needs satisfaction (competence, autonomy, and relatedness) and achievement in chemistry O-Levels Syllabus, at the end of the research program.

Findings

Hypothesis testing represented that use of blended learning program has significant and positive impact on academic achievements through the mediation of autonomy. Results also revealed the substantial association of blended learning on other psychological needs (i.e., competence and relatedness); however, the competence and relatedness have no effect on academic achievements in this study. Thus, research concludes that providing an autonomous environment in substitution of the controlled environment promotes learning and produces positive outcomes.

Originality/value

Blended learning or use of Learning Management Systems is being commonly used mostly in the tertiary level of studies; however, blended learning with secondary classes especially in the field of chemistry is yet not studied in detail. Similarly, the usefulness of the motivational strategies to learn chemistry is observed with university-level students, but very rare data about encouraging students at the secondary level have been gathered. Therefore, the researcher designed this blended learning program to enhance students’ motivation towards achievements in secondary chemistry.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2021

Mohammad Reza Keramati and Robyn Margaret Gillies

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of embedding cooperative learning (CL) into the Primary and Secondary Education Course (PSEC) on the academic achievement

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of embedding cooperative learning (CL) into the Primary and Secondary Education Course (PSEC) on the academic achievement of undergraduate university students. The study also sought to gauge the perceptions of these students application of CL.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a mixed methods sequential explanatory design involving 136 undergraduate university students who participated in a 16 week semester intervention involving the implementation of CL into their PSEC. Achievement data were collected from all students pre- and post-intervention to determine if there were significant differences between the experimental and control conditions. Forty-four participants from the experimental condition were also interviewed post-intervention on their experiences of CL.

Findings

The results showed that there was a significant difference between the academic achievement of students in the experimental and control groups in favor of students in the experimental group (p < 0.001). The perceptions of participants in the experimental condition indicated that CL not only created an empathetic, safe and pleasant learning environment and strengthened students' individual and communicative skills, but it also helped to develop an understanding of quality learning.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study have the potential to influence university instructors by demonstrating how CL provides opportunities to not only improve student learning but also their attitude to learning.

Originality/value

This study, while demonstrating the positive effect of CL on students' academic achievement also revealed the potential this approach to teaching and learning has for embedding it in other university courses.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Åge Diseth, Ståle Pallesen, Anders Hovland and Svein Larsen

The present study seeks to compare scores on factors from the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) with scores on an abbreviated version of the Approaches and Study…

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3560

Abstract

Purpose

The present study seeks to compare scores on factors from the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) with scores on an abbreviated version of the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST) and examination grade among undergraduate psychology students. The purpose is to investigate the relationship between course experience and approaches to learning, and to examine their relative importance as predictors of academic achievement.

Design/methodology/approach

Confirmatory factor analyses and structural equation modelling were utilised in order to find measurement models for each of the constructs and to test hypothesised structural relations between these constructs.

Findings

The original CEQ and ASSIST factors were reproduced. A model in which course experience factors predicted SAL was supported, but the same model did not provide evidence for any indirect or mediator effect between course experience, approaches to learning and academic achievement. Indirect empirical support for a hypothesised causal link between course experience and approaches to learning was found.

Research limitations/implications

Weak relations between the predictor variables (course experience/approaches to learning) and academic achievement limited the possibility of identifying mediator effects, and future research should address this issue.

Practical implications

Lecturers and course designers should take into account that students' approaches to learning are influenced by course experience, especially with respect to the adoption of a surface approach to learning.

Originality/value

This paper included a comparison between course experience, approaches to learning, and academic achievement, whereas most previous research has not included academic achievement. The utilisation of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling gave a stronger test of construct validity than exploratory analyses, and it facilitated the testing of hypothesised structural models.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 48 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

David Davies

This account aims to introduce contrasting perspectives on teaching and learning methods, and to detail the growth of new forms and vocabularies of access to learning. As…

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2198

Abstract

This account aims to introduce contrasting perspectives on teaching and learning methods, and to detail the growth of new forms and vocabularies of access to learning. As we move towards the new millennium, the development of national, yet diversified, credit frameworks and systems will provide an essential underpinning for the organisational culture that will be needed to sustain the wellbeing and growth of the educational system. These new systems are already being incorporated into the practice of ‘virtual’ education. Lifelong learning has widespread support across the social and political spectrum and its importance can hardly be over‐stated as we seek to maintain competitiveness in a changing world. Increasing knowledge and understanding to serve both the needs of the economy and of individuals to play a major role in democratic life has become an agenda of necessity as well as desire. An open society requires open systems of knowledge. A prognosis for the future is submitted where the significance of part‐time modular and open flexible learning is evaluated in terms of a curriculum rooted in useful knowledge and competences, acquired at different sites of learning, including the workplace. It is argued that modular structures, using the potential offered by credit accumulation and transfer to different institutions with different missions, can transcend and transform the learning opportunities for students in a mass system of higher education which is rapidly becoming part of a global market economy and society. Continuous lifelong learning involving its key features of open access, recognition of learning wherever it takes place and the growth of new learning networks and partnerships, is at the conceptual heart of the development of the virtual university.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Benjamin Kücherer, Markus Dresel and Martin Daumiller

Professional training courses play an important role for higher education instructors and their teaching quality. However, participants strongly differ in how much they…

Abstract

Purpose

Professional training courses play an important role for higher education instructors and their teaching quality. However, participants strongly differ in how much they learn in these courses. The present study seeks to explain these differences by focusing on attention as a central aspect of their behavioral engagement that can stem from participants' achievement motivations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors investigated the attention of participants in full-day higher education professional training courses and how differences therein are associated with their achievement goals. Prior to course participation, 117 university instructors (49.6% male, 79.5% with PhD, average age 31.4 years) reported their achievement goals. Using an adapted observational instrument (Hommel, 2012a), two raters subsequently observed and coded the participants' attention during the course (ICC2 = 0.83).

Findings

The results documented very high attention levels, although with substantial interindividual differences. Multilevel analyses indicated that learning goals positively and work avoidance goals negatively predicted observed attention.

Originality/value

The findings provide insight into the value of an observational approach to measuring a fundamental aspect of learning engagement, and contribute to the understanding of interindividual differences in an important higher education learning environment. The study illuminates the relevance of personal predictors for university instructors' successful learning. Specifically, the findings point to the significance of goals as a relevant, but surprisingly hitherto uninvestigated, premise of learning engagement.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2020

Luisa Helena Pinto, Carlos Cabral-Cardoso and William B. Werther Jr.

Under the framework of the achievement goal and expectancy-value theories, this study aims to examine which motivational goals lead people to self-initiate an…

Abstract

Purpose

Under the framework of the achievement goal and expectancy-value theories, this study aims to examine which motivational goals lead people to self-initiate an international assignment and predict subjective assignment achievements.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from a convenience sample of 141 self-initiated expatriates (SIEs) from multiple locations. The first set of analyses tested the hypothesis that demographics and expectancies of competence in living and working abroad discriminate the individuals who initiate an international assignment for learning goals from the ones who value performance goals. The second set of analyses tested the hypothesis that individual expectancies and goals predict specific subjective assignment achievements and overall success.

Findings

The results show that SIEs who had greater confidence in their ability to live and work abroad were also more likely to move to pursuit performance goals. They also reported greater host adjustment and superior professional accomplishments, but not higher family achievements or success.

Originality/value

In contrast to the dominant descriptive approach to the study of SIEs, this study underpins the adequacy and potential of a motivational approach in predicting SIEs’ behaviors and outcomes. The theoretical and managerial implications for international business and cross-cultural management are further discussed.

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