Search results

1 – 10 of over 70000
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2010

Robert W. Maloy and Irene LaRoche

Using student-centered teaching methods presents a great challenge to many new middle and high school history teachers. Having experienced mostly teacher-centered…

Abstract

Using student-centered teaching methods presents a great challenge to many new middle and high school history teachers. Having experienced mostly teacher-centered instructional approaches (such as lectures and teacher-led discussions) in secondary school and college classes, they begin student teaching with few models for how to teach using less traditional forms of instruction. This paper discusses “Ideas, Issues, and Insights,” a strategy for prospective history teachers, as they explore the use of student-centered teaching methods with middle and high school students. It analyzes written reflection papers where history teacher candidates identify their ideas for three student-centered instructional methods — small group work, primary source analysis, and historical role-plays and simulations — as well as issues that arise when these student-centered methods are implemented in the classroom. As history teacher candidates respond to their ideas and issues, they generate insights about how they can best use student-centered teaching methods in their future classrooms. The first-person perspectives of history teacher candidates are highlighted to show how college students in one university-based teacher preparation program think about their student teaching experiences and their choice of instructional methods to use with students.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Yi Tan, Wenyu Xu, Keyu Chen, Chunyan Deng and Peng Wang

At present, teaching methods based on 2D drawings are still commonly used for educating students on the location of steel reinforcement bars in concrete. However…

Abstract

Purpose

At present, teaching methods based on 2D drawings are still commonly used for educating students on the location of steel reinforcement bars in concrete. However, traditional teaching methods have limitations as students can find it difficult to understand 2D drawings. This study aims to develop an interactive and collaborative augmented reality environment (ICARE) using augmented reality (AR) technology to improve students' engagement in learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops an ICARE prototype, which is organized into two stages: (1) The augmented teaching environment comprising of models and interactive components; (2) The AR collaborative application which uses Photon Unity Networking (PUN) plugin and Azure spatial anchors cloud service. The AR-based teaching environment runs with Universal Windows Platform (UWP) to enable development in the HoloLens 2 through Microsoft Visual Studio.

Findings

An experimental study was conducted, where 60 students were divided into three groups employing Drawings-based, building information modeling (BIM)-based and AR-based methods for teaching. After the test, the three groups of students were requested to complete a questionnaire. According to the analysis of the experimental results, the ICARE can improve students' comprehension, memory of learned materials and their ability to read and understand steel reinforcement drawings improving the quality of teaching, especially interactivity and engagement.

Originality/value

As illustrated in the experiments, the developed ICARE has outstanding performance over conventional approaches in civil engineering courses that can improve students' comprehension and memory of knowledge and their ability to read and understand steel bar drawings. This study provides empirical evidence that AR is a promising technology that can be integrated with traditional classroom instruction and can improve students' comprehension and memory of knowledge and their ability to read and understand steel bar drawings.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Conor O'Leary

The purpose of this paper is to consider how ethics is currently taught to trainee auditors and to evaluate whether some ethical instruction techniques can be assessed as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how ethics is currently taught to trainee auditors and to evaluate whether some ethical instruction techniques can be assessed as more effective than others.

Design/methodology/approach

Two separate cohorts of auditing students (262) provided responses to audit/accounting ethical scenarios. Each cohort was then subject to three separate ethics teaching techniques (either active or passive), from the two different teaching methodologies (active v. passive) over a semester. Their ethical attitudes to the scenarios were then re‐assessed and the teaching techniques evaluated.

Findings

Both methodologies were found to impact positively, as both cohorts selected more ethical responses to the scenarios post instruction. Some evidence of active techniques having more effect than passive techniques, on ethical decision making was revealed.

Research limitations/implications

More research is needed into the impact of active and passive teaching methodologies on trainee auditors, in the ethics area.

Practical implications

Teaching ethics to the audit practitioners of tomorrow is critical. If the optimum mix of ethical teaching methodologies can be assessed, it will result in more effective ethical instruction. This study's results imply careful consideration must be taken in designing ethical training programs for trainee auditors.

Social implications

Improvement in the ethical behaviour of auditors will provide more confidence for users of accounting information in the business environment.

Originality/value

This paper is original in that it evaluates the impact of a series of ethical instruction methods, as opposed to a single teaching method (the focus of many previous papers) on ethical training. The tentative finding of active methods proving more effective than passive methods is significant, and paves the way for future research.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Niall Piercy, Alistair Brandon‐Jones, Emma Brandon‐Jones and Colin Campbell

This paper aims to examine the preferences of students towards different teaching methods and the perceived effectiveness of experiential teaching methods in different…

1869

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the preferences of students towards different teaching methods and the perceived effectiveness of experiential teaching methods in different operations management (OM) modules.

Design/methodology/approach

Student perceptions of different teaching methods and various aspects of an experiential teaching method, in the form of a business simulation game, are examined using survey data from 274 respondents in four small post‐experience and two large pre‐experience OM modules.

Findings

The paper's analysis suggests that traditional and experiential teaching methods are both popular with OM students, whilst independent teaching methods are less well liked. Analysis also shows that students on both kinds of OM modules perceive most aspects of the experiential teaching method used in this study (The Operations Game) very positively.

Research limitations/implications

This research study was confined to a particular type of experiential teaching method – a business simulation game. There is a need for further research to investigate the perceived effectiveness of other experiential teaching methods, such as role‐plays and live cases. Furthermore, the paper does not examine the use of experiential teaching methods that do not require the physical presence of students.

Practical implications

For OM educators, the paper clarifies how they might incorporate experiential teaching methods in different class settings. Whilst experiential teaching methods are typically used for small post‐experience modules, these data indicate that the method can also be used on larger pre‐experience modules with great success. The paper also notes a number of challenges involved in using experiential teaching methods on both kinds of module.

Originality/value

This is the first known study to directly examine the perceived effectiveness of an experiential teaching method in both small post‐experience and larger pre‐experience OM modules.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 32 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Rekai Zenda

The purpose of this paper is to explore teaching methods that can allow learners to be creative and proactive. The learners should be able to solve problems, make…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore teaching methods that can allow learners to be creative and proactive. The learners should be able to solve problems, make decisions, think critically, communicate ideas effectively and work efficiently. Teaching and learning are evolving and developing in many countries, with a focus concerning what is actually learned through effective teaching methods.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research was carried out, identifying effective teaching methods and exploring their roles in teaching and learning in physical sciences in selected rural secondary schools. Face-to-face interviews with physical sciences teachers, school principals and curriculum advisers were used to collect data.

Findings

A range of teaching methods that may be integrated into teaching and learning activities is identified. The teaching methods ensure that topics are discussed and explored through interaction and sharing of perspective, views and values through which new learning can emerge. Viewed from this perspective, there is a need to create a stimulating, enriching, challenging and focused environment for physical sciences learners through the use of multiple teaching methodologies.

Research limitations/implications

The improvement of science learner’s academic achievement requires also the teachers to develop new skills and ways of teaching the subject. Improving learner academic achievement in physical sciences requires an approach to improve the skills of teachers as well, which focuses on the effective use of teaching methods such as experiments. This means attempting to change the attitude of teachers to regard the processes of teaching and learning as central to their role. In addition, the achievement of learners in science could possibly solve the problem of shortages of engineers, skilled artisans, technicians, doctors and technologists for sustainable development. It is important to create conducive conditions for learning and teaching in physical sciences, and continue to progressively and within available resources, realise that collaboration, problem-solving and hands-on activities are effective teaching methods to improve learner academic achievement.

Practical implications

The learners should be able to solve problems, make decisions, think critically, communicate ideas effectively and work efficiently. The study is limited to the teaching methods used in physical sciences. Hands-on activities are essential in science teaching and learning.

Social implications

The use of collaborations, peer teachings and hands-on activities allows learners emphasise the creation of a classroom where students are engaged in essentially open-ended, student-centred and hands-on experiments.

Originality/value

The paper is original work, in which face-to-face interviews were carried out. Qualitative research was carried out. The paper could assist educators in the teaching of physical sciences in secondary schools using the identified methods. The results were obtained from physical sciences educators, school principals and curriculum advisors in South Africa. Poor academic achievement in rural areas is a concern, and therefore, the paper provides effective methods which can be used by educators in the teaching of physical sciences in rural areas.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 118 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Inés Küster and Natalia Vila

To compare marketing education methods in Europe and North America, and analyse the opinions about effectiveness underpinning educators' choices among available options.

1435

Abstract

Purpose

To compare marketing education methods in Europe and North America, and analyse the opinions about effectiveness underpinning educators' choices among available options.

Design/methodology/approach

E‐mail questionnaires distributed to a sampling frame extracted from the worldwide directory of the Academy of Marketing Science were completed by 93 marketing academics in North America and 42 in Europe: a 26 per cent overall return rate. Data were analysed by χ2, ANOVA and correspondence analysis.

Findings

Three teaching‐and‐learning methods are most common in both environments: practical exercises, case studies and lectures. Europeans tend to rely on lectures and other traditional methods, while Americans make more use of technology‐based alternatives. The approach to the subject in Europe favours practical exercises, for their connection to the real world. Practice in North America reflects a cultural predisposition to personalised teaching, by emphasising face‐to‐face small‐group tutorials and one‐to‐one distance learning interaction. Teaching methods popular in the business world are little used across the sample, a somewhat paradoxical finding in a business‐school environment.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is comparatively small, and the European sub‐sample is not further broken down into cultural sub‐groups. Because the research instrument was adapted from one previous Spanish‐language survey, terminology may have influenced the responses.

Practical implications

The findings could be a useful input to planning of teaching and learning strategies, particularly in the international and distance‐learning contexts.

Originality/value

A rare comparative study of marketing education, suggesting fruitful directions for future research.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Joy‐Telu Hamilton‐Ekeke and Malcolm Thomas

This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of a teaching method (TLS (Teaching/Learning Sequence)) based on a social constructivist paradigm on students'…

2413

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of a teaching method (TLS (Teaching/Learning Sequence)) based on a social constructivist paradigm on students' conceptualisation of classification of food.

Design/methodology/approach

The study compared the TLS model developed by the researcher based on the social constructivist paradigm with the Regular Teaching Method (RTM) in use in the school. Students exposed to the TLS model constituted the experimental group, while the students exposed to the RTM constituted the control group. The design was a pre‐test/post‐test control design with a retention‐phase.

Findings

Results before intervention revealed gross misconceptions of pupils' classification of food, while after intervention there was significant improvement of the TLS over RTM.

Research limitations/implications

The context of the research is limited to students' conceptualisation of classification of food items into the five classes of food, i.e. carbohydrate, protein, fat, vitamin, and mineral. Although food group allocation was validated from previous literature, it is still a potential limitation as a single food item may contain more than one nutrient, which makes its classification in a single food class difficult.

Practical implications

Understanding whether students' conceptualisation of classes of food is changed by the information they received by established methods would be valuable when devising methods of delivering nutrition education.

Social implications

Food provision in schools must support the messages that pupils receive through the formal curriculum.

Originality/value

Education can be immensely helpful in the pursuit of better understanding by children regarding healthy eating.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 February 2022

Ana Paula Lista, Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Marina Bouzon, Matthias Thürer and Daniel Jurburg

This study aims to investigate the impact of traditional teaching and active learning methods in lean management (LM) on the development of both soft and hard skills.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of traditional teaching and active learning methods in lean management (LM) on the development of both soft and hard skills.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a longitudinal study, team members from two different organisations (the administrative sector of a public higher education institution and a public teaching hospital), each adopting different teaching methods to support their LM trainings, were systematically examined at four moments during an 18-month period. How teaching methods impacted team members’ development and knowledge was then assessed using multivariate data analysis techniques.

Findings

Results indicated that LM trainings can provide significant impacts when a combination of traditional teaching methods and active learning is adopted. Traditional teaching methods can be a good choice for learning hard skills depending on resources’ availability. However, it is recommended to include active learning methods to assist in the comprehension of more complex and abstract LM concepts (soft skills).

Originality/value

Although there exists a large number of publications on the relationship between LM implementation and teaching methods, the number of studies that consider the development of both hard and soft skills is rather limited. This study complements the existing literature on LM by identifying which teaching methods can support the development of hard skills and which the development of soft skills. Such identification facilitates the work of both scholars wishing either to begin or to dig deeper into this sphere and practitioners pursuing the best outcomes from LM.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2022

Qixing Yang, Quan Chen, Jingan Wang and Ruiqiu Ou

This study has two objectives: to explore the factors that influence student self-efficacy regarding engagement and learning outcomes in a business simulation game course…

Abstract

Purpose

This study has two objectives: to explore the factors that influence student self-efficacy regarding engagement and learning outcomes in a business simulation game course and to compare the difference between hierarchical and general teaching methods.

Design/methodology/approach

From September 2021 to May 2022, a questionnaire was administered to 126 students in a business simulation game course at the Zhongshan Institute, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China. Data were analyzed using nonparametric paired samples tests and linear regression.

Findings

The results showed that student self-efficacy, engagement and learning outcomes were significantly higher with the hierarchical teaching method than with the general teaching method. There were also differences in the factors that influenced self-efficacy regarding learning outcomes between the two teaching methods. With the general teaching method, student self-efficacy did not directly affect learning outcomes, but did so indirectly by mediating the effect of engagement. However, with the hierarchical teaching method, self-efficacy directly and significantly affected learning outcomes, in addition to indirectly affecting learning outcomes through student engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Compared with the control group experimental research method, the quasi-experimental research method can eliminate the influence of sample heterogeneity itself, but the state of the same sample may change at different times, which is not necessarily caused by the hierarchical teaching design.

Practical implications

Based on the results of this study, teachers can apply hierarchical teaching according to student ability levels when integrating business simulation games. The results of this study can inspire teachers to protect student self-confidence and make teaching objectives and specific requirements clear in the beginning of the course, and also provide an important practical suggestion for students on how to improve their course performance.

Social implications

The research results can be extended to other courses. Teachers can improve students' self-efficacy through hierarchical teaching design, thus improving students' learning performance and also provide reference value for students to improve their learning performance.

Originality/value

This study built a model based on self-system model of motivational development (SSMMD) theory, comparing factors that affect student self-efficacy regarding learning outcomes under different teaching methods. The model enriches the literature on SSMMD theory as applied to business simulation game courses and adds to our understanding of hierarchical teaching methods in this field. The results provide a valuable reference for teachers that can improve teaching methods and learning outcomes.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Sveinn Vidar Gudmundsson and Jan Nijhuis

The article reports on the development of a collaborative learning method in two master’s level courses given as part of a logistics track within an international business…

Abstract

The article reports on the development of a collaborative learning method in two master’s level courses given as part of a logistics track within an international business degree programme. The method, termed the three‐way interaction method (3WIM), combines traditional case teaching and problem‐based learning through high intensity three‐way interaction between student groups. The method involves one group taking the role of problem‐solvers (presenters/consultants), another group taking the role of decision‐makers (company executives/board of directors), while the third group evaluates the performance of the other two groups (skill development/quality improvement). As usual in collaborative learning, the 3WIM is student‐driven, so the tutor takes on the role of a facilitator rather than the main disseminator of knowledge. Comparing the course evaluations of the previous approach to learning and the 3WIM, a statistically significant improvement was detected in satisfaction among students. What is more, the method solved other problems, such as increasing the intensity of the learning experience, reducing passenger tendencies and absences.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 70000