Search results

1 – 10 of over 110000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2019

John N. Moye

In this chapter, each of the completed models of curriculum is presented and evaluated using criteria from the attributes of effective curricula discussed in Chapter 1…

Abstract

Chapter Summary

In this chapter, each of the completed models of curriculum is presented and evaluated using criteria from the attributes of effective curricula discussed in Chapter 1. Explanations of the design strategies that are used to demonstrate each attribute in a differentiated manner are included. The evaluation process provides an evaluation methodology to demonstrate the effectiveness of each model of a curriculum in a credible and trustworthy way.

In the previous chapters, the individual parts of the curricula were configured, aligned, and interconnected to deliver specific outcomes in each learning module. In this chapter, the components of each curriculum are assembled into one table to exhibit the order contained within each learning module within the overall curriculum. The standards for curricular attributes adopted at the beginning of the design process are the criteria for the evaluation of the completed curriculum. The strategies used to configure the components of each curriculum provide evidence of the curriculum’s characteristics, which demonstrate compliance with each criterion.

The evaluation of these attributes within a curriculum serves several purposes. First, they provide a checklist to guide the design process toward curricula that reflect these standards as developed by the profession of curriculum design in higher education. Second, they provide a measurement of the attributes of the curriculum to demonstrate the compliance of each curricular design with conventional standards. Third, these measurements can be compared with other institutional data to uncover correlations between the design assumptions and learner performance. These correlations often reveal unanticipated results, which inform the effectiveness of the instructional system.

These criteria are applied to the evaluation of the curriculum for each module to demonstrate the diverse manner in which each can be achieved in a discipline-specific manner. The compliance with these criteria is explained to be a matter of demonstration, as used in the discipline of qualitative research. These qualitative evaluations can then be compared with other operational data to understand the effectiveness of the design assumptions for each curriculum.

Details

Learning Differentiated Curriculum Design in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-117-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Erastus Karanja and Laurell C. Malone

This study aims to investigate how to improve the project management (PM) curriculum by evaluating the nature and alignment of learning outcomes in the PM course syllabi…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how to improve the project management (PM) curriculum by evaluating the nature and alignment of learning outcomes in the PM course syllabi with Bloom’s Taxonomy framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology for this study is an integrative approach that uses document analysis and content analysis. The data set was selected based on a purposeful sampling method and came from PM course syllabi for classes that were taught during the 2016–2018 academic years.

Findings

Results revealed that most of the reviewed PM course syllabi contained learning outcomes although they were written and assessed at the lower levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy and knowledge dimensions. The study calls for the academy and industry to partner in improving the PM curriculum to lower the PM talent deficit and increase project success rates.

Research limitations/implications

The absence of PM learning outcomes or the presence of poorly written PM learning outcomes in a course implies that the academy should provide professional development programs to help professors learn how to formulate and write specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and timely learning outcomes. The professors should also ensure that the learning outcomes use a type of cognitive taxonomy that is aligned with the appropriate assessments to measure, monitor and guarantee assurance of learning.

Practical implications

Academy and industry partners can work collaboratively to provide students with opportunities that expose them to real-world experiential projects, internships and job opportunities while concurrently giving them hands-on practical applications of learned PM knowledge and skills. The society will be well served when the academy is able to produce well-qualified PM personnel capable of successfully carrying out PM activities and lowering the project’s failure rates.

Social implications

The society will be well served when the academy is able to produce well-qualified PM personnel capable of successfully carrying out PM activities and lowering the project’s failure rates.

Originality/value

To the researchers’ knowledge, this is the first study to specifically investigate the presence and nature of PM learning outcomes in course syllabi. By evaluating the alignment between PM learning outcomes and Bloom’s Taxonomy action verbs and cognitive processes, the study provides some exemplars of well-written and measurable learning outcomes that professors can use to inform their PM curriculum through course design or redesign.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Henrik Kock and Per‐Erik Ellström

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding of the relationships among the workplace as a learning environment, strategies for competence development used by…

Downloads
4478

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding of the relationships among the workplace as a learning environment, strategies for competence development used by SMEs and learning outcomes. Specifically, there is a focus on a distinction between formal and integrated strategies for competence development, the conditions under which these strategies are likely to be used, and their effects in terms of individual learning outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was based mainly on questionnaire data collected through a survey of 14 SMEs that had received support from the European Social Fund's Objective 3 programme. In addition, data collected through interviews and analyses of documents were used.

Findings

The results indicate interactions between the strategy of competence development used by the firms (formal vs integrated) and the type of learning environment in the workplace (constraining vs enabling). The use of an integrated strategy in an enabling learning environment was the most successful combination in terms of learning outcomes, while the use of an integrated strategy in a constraining learning environment was the least successful combination.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to elaborate the theoretical and empirical basis of the distinction between formal and integrated strategies for competence development, and to study the effects of the two types of strategy, not only for individual learning outcomes, but also for effects at an organisational level.

Practical implications

HRD practitioners need to question a traditional reliance on formal training, as the presented results indicate the importance of using competence development strategies that are based on an integration of formal and informal learning.

Originality/value

The study indicates that the effects of competence development efforts are likely to be a function not only, nor primarily, of the training methods and strategies that are used, but also of the characteristics of the learning environment of the workplace.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Volker Gehmlich

The purpose of this paper is to answer a set of questions related to “Kompetenz”, “Beruf” and the German Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning. What is a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer a set of questions related to “Kompetenz”, “Beruf” and the German Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning. What is a competence, can it be measured? Is the “Beruf” really endangered by the focus on learning outcomes? What are the implications as regards the learning process? Are permeability and mobility between occupations fostered?

Design/methodology/approach

Literature was analysed to identify elements which are linked to the introduction of qualifications frameworks in Germany and which have an impact on the German system of education and training. Additionally some primary research was done by interviewing about 50 experts in the field. The results were published prior to this paper in the form of a study on behalf of the German government. Here they are used to highlight potentially controversial issues: “Beruf”, “Qualifikation”, “Kompetenz”, “learning outcomes” and their relationship to qualifications frameworks.

Findings

It is assumed that “Beruf” will also be used in future but in different contexts. It will describe any type of occupation or profession without the need to specify the way to get there (“Berufsbild”). Instead, there will be flexible pathways, allowing for non‐formal and informal learning. Its former role of structuring training will be taken over by “Kompetenz” within the qualifications frameworks. It is recommended to clearly differentiate between learning outcomes and “Kompetenz”.

Research limitations/implications

As a one‐year pilot phase to test the proposed qualifications framework is about to start, the final outcomes may be different from what is expected on the basis of this research.

Originality/value

The paper answers a set of questions related to “Kompetenz”, “Beruf” and the German Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 33 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Godson Ayertei Tetteh

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between the student’s class attendance and learning strategies that will influence Bloom et al. (1956) learning outcome or…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between the student’s class attendance and learning strategies that will influence Bloom et al. (1956) learning outcome or performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from undergraduate students in their final year. Student identification number was subsequently matched to observe initial, final assessments and responses from questionnaire using parts of MSLQ (Pintrich et al., 1991). Hypotheses were tested, and data were analyzed using multiple regression analysis and multinomial logistic regression analysis.

Findings

Students’ learning strategies and class attendance are in fact related. Thus, class attendance, students’ study time and the mid-semester exams could explain more than 34.0 per cent of the variance. The results show that class attendance, mid-semester exams and study time had a significant positive influence on the learning outcome.

Research limitations/implications

This study used undergraduate students in a university in Ghana, and may not necessarily be applicable universally. Also, teachers’ expectancies were not controlled. Another potential limitation was that TQM was the only subject area used for this study.

Practical implications

This study will recommend teachers to work individually with students in setting appropriate goals for each exam and frequently offer feedback. The results may influence on-line teaching and the student’s role in teaching and learning in the class.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to literature by examining how the student’s learning strategies, class attendances, study time, gender, status (part time student or full time student) influence the learning outcome or performance. This paper findings will provide educators new ways to understand student behavior and to assist them in achieving learning success.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Allen Z. Reich, Galen R. Collins, Agnes L. DeFranco and Suzanne L. Pieper

Because of the increasingly higher expectations of accrediting organizations, calls for greater accountability from state governments and students’ demand for an education…

Abstract

Purpose

Because of the increasingly higher expectations of accrediting organizations, calls for greater accountability from state governments and students’ demand for an education that prepares them for a career, most hospitality programs are now required to have an effective assessment of learning outcomes process. The increasing popularity of the assessment of learning outcomes process is viewed as highly positive because it can be considered as best-practices in higher education. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This is Part 2 of a two-part article that provides an overview of the justifications for implementing an assessment of learning outcomes process, the steps that were developed by two hospitality programs, and the experiences of the two programs during implementation.

Findings

The steps in a closed-loop assessment of learning outcomes process are relatively detailed; however, because of changes in expectations of stakeholders and the requirements of accreditors, they are now mandatory for most hospitality programs. Therefore, the choice is not whether to implement them, but when. From a competitive standpoint, it is to the program’s advantage to begin as soon as possible. Another factor to consider is that the implementation of a closed-loop assessment of learning outcomes process will take several years to complete.

Originality/value

This paper is presenting a critical view of one of, if not the most important concepts in higher education, the closed-loop assessment of learning outcomes process. Hopefully, the information on the process that is provided and the experiences of the two programs can shorten the learning curve for other hospitality programs.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Eva Kyndt, Eva Vermeire and Shana Cabus

This paper aims to examine which organisational learning conditions and individual characteristics predict the learning outcomes nurses achieve through informal learning

Downloads
3154

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine which organisational learning conditions and individual characteristics predict the learning outcomes nurses achieve through informal learning activities. There is specific relevance for the nursing profession because of the rapidly changing healthcare systems.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 203 nurses completed a survey assessing their perception of the available learning conditions, the learning outcomes they acquired by executing their job and their self-efficacy, proactive personality and learning motivation. After checking the structure and reliability of the instruments by means of confirmatory factor analysis and the calculation of the internal consistency of the scales, a multivariate multiple regression analyses was performed because the different learning outcomes (dependent variables) were correlated with each other.

Findings

Results show that learning outcomes as a whole are significantly predicted by opportunities for cooperation and feedback. Regarding generic and job-specific learning outcomes, analyses showed the same predictors for both levels of learning outcomes: opportunities for feedback and self-efficacy. Higher proactivity and opportunities for cooperation are related to higher organisational level learning outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study is that its findings rely on cross-sectional survey data; hence, further research is needed to confirm these initial exploratory results.

Originality/value

The current study is one of the few studies that empirically relates organisational learning conditions to learning outcomes acquired by employees while considering the personal characteristics of the employee. It offers insight into which learning conditions are able to foster the acquirement of different learning outcomes.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

A Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence Approach to Institutional Effectiveness in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-900-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Carl J. Dunst and Deborah W. Hamby

The effectiveness of different types of adult learning practices for promoting practitioner and parent use of different kinds of assistive technology and adaptations with…

Abstract

The effectiveness of different types of adult learning practices for promoting practitioner and parent use of different kinds of assistive technology and adaptations with young children of 18–105 months of age was the focus of a research synthesis described in this chapter. Six operationally defined adult learning methods and between two and five practices for each method were used to code and analyze the results for both adult (practitioner and parent) and child outcomes. The assistive technology and adaptations that were the focus of training included speech generative devices (e.g., CheapTalk), computers (e.g., adapted keyboards), and switch-activated devices and toys. Results showed that a combination of five or six of the most effective adult learning method practices were associated with the largest differences in both adult and child outcomes, but that few studies included the most effective practices. The relationship between the number of practices and the study outcomes was moderated by the type of training (individual vs. group) and whether the training included in vivo use of the devices with children with disabilities. The results point to at least several factors that explain non-use of assistive technology with young children with disabilities and highlight the need for better designed and implemented training.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Howard J. Klein and Aden E. Heuser

This chapter briefly reviews findings from recent socialization research to provide an updated view of the socialization literature. To help advance the literature, this…

Abstract

This chapter briefly reviews findings from recent socialization research to provide an updated view of the socialization literature. To help advance the literature, this chapter then takes an instructional system approach, viewing socialization fundamentally as a process of learning about a new or changed role and the environment surrounding that role. As such, attention will first be given to further understanding exactly what needs to be learned during socialization. In doing so, an expanded socialization content typology is presented. In addition, two other components are added to this typology to reflect the fact that (a) each of those content dimensions needs to be learned relative to different organizational levels (e.g., job, work group, unit, organization) and (b) socialization occurs over several months and there are temporal considerations relating to the different socialization content dimensions. This chapter then examines how to best facilitate the learning of that expanded socialization content. The Gagné-Briggs theory of instruction is used in connecting socialization content with the means of learning that content. The socialization and orienting activities commonly used by organizations to help new employees in the adjustment process are also identified and then mapped onto the learning outcomes they could best help facilitate. Finally, the conceptual, measurement, and research needs suggested by these extensions to the socialization literature are identified.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-004-9

1 – 10 of over 110000