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Intellectual Disability Nursing: An Oral History Project
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-152-3

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2011

Eunice Rodriguez, Diana Austria and Melinda Landau

There is a need for rigorous research documenting the important role of school nurses in facilitating positive health outcomes among students. Poorly managed care can…

Abstract

There is a need for rigorous research documenting the important role of school nurses in facilitating positive health outcomes among students. Poorly managed care can affect student absenteeism rates, which are associated with academic performance and school funding, and students in underresourced schools are at particularly higher risk of suffering chronic conditions (e.g., asthma, diabetes) that necessitate proper care and management. The San Jose Unified School District (SJUSD) Nurse Demonstration Project was developed as a five-year endeavor to expand school nursing and formally link school nurses to a school-based health clinic. The initiative provides for full-time school nurses at four elementary and middle schools in SJUSD, and a nurse practitioner at School Health Clinics of Santa Clara County. The objectives are to: (1) improve access to primary care and prevention services, specifically asthma and chronic condition management and (2) facilitate the establishment of a medical home for students. Evaluation of the project employs a mixed methods research design, including a logic model, an intervention and control study design (comparing outcome measures in the four demonstration schools with five “control” schools), parent, teacher, and school administrator feedback, systematic nurse reports, and quantitative analysis of school health and administrative data, including health conditions and absenteeism information. Key findings in Phase I of the project are discussed, including improvement in screening and referrals, follow-up care among students with asthma, and mean days absent due to illness. With increasing budget cuts to public schools, documenting the impact of full-time school nurses will remain crucial in leveraging support and resources for school health services. Findings of this project indicate that school nurses provide valuable services and could be a major player in providing and coordinating effective management and prevention of chronic disease among children.

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Democracies: Challenges to Societal Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-238-8

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Nora Montalvo-Liendo, Robin Page, Jenifer Chilton and Angeles Nava

The purpose of this article is to describe the development of a Nurse-led Long-term Support Group (NLLTSG) as an intervention for Latina women survivors of intimate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to describe the development of a Nurse-led Long-term Support Group (NLLTSG) as an intervention for Latina women survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) as well as to discuss a process for facilitation.

Design/methodology/approach

Yalom’s (2005) group therapy principles guided the creation of the NLLTSGs. According to Yolam, interaction with others and sharing stories reinforces connections within group members and leads to interpersonal learning (Yalom, 2005).

Findings

Latina women survivors of IPV do not have adequate support post IPV relationships. In this case study, the authors describe the process for developing and facilitating a NLLTSG for Latina women survivors.

Research limitations/implications

The case study intervention only included Latina women living in the US Texas–Mexico border. Questions remain regarding the effectiveness of LTNLSGs with women from other cultures and geographic regions.

Practical implications

Nurses, nurse practitioners and other professionals can partner with community service agencies to offer this vital intervention to support and empower Latina women survivors and their families. Implications for future research include theory development and quantitative studies to measure empowerment and healing in Latina women survivors of IPV. The intervention and process should expand to include women of other cultures and geographic region.

Social implications

The case study established a NLLTSG as an effective intervention for initiating and maintaining a NLLTSG with Latina women survivors of IPV as well. NLLTSGs seem to be an essential intervention for recovery in this vulnerable population.

Originality/value

The content of this paper describes an innovative, culturally sensitive, practitioner-engaged response to intimate partner violence in Latina women survivors.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Christian Gadolin, Maria Skyvell Nilsson, Axel Ros and Marianne Törner

The purpose of this paper is to inductively explore the context-specific preconditions for nurses' perceived organizational support (POS) in healthcare organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to inductively explore the context-specific preconditions for nurses' perceived organizational support (POS) in healthcare organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative interview study was performed, based on the critical incident technique (CIT), with 24 registered nurses in different specialities of hospital care.

Findings

The nurses perceived three actors as essential for their POS: the first-line manager, the overarching organization and their college. The preconditions affecting the nurses’ perceptions of organizational support were supportive structuring and structures at work, as well as individual recognition and professional acknowledgement.

Originality/value

Previous studies of POS have mostly had a quantitative outset. In this paper, context-specific preconditions for nurses' POS are described in depth, enabled by the qualitative approach of the study. The findings may be used to guide healthcare organizations and managers aiming to foster nurses' POS, and thereby, benefit nurses' well-being and retention, as well as healthcare quality and efficiency.

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Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2021

Jennifer Oates, Rasiha Hassan and Sam Coster

This paper aims to present a thematic analysis of student nurses’ experiences of an innovative collaboration between a mental health Recovery College and a nursing

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a thematic analysis of student nurses’ experiences of an innovative collaboration between a mental health Recovery College and a nursing faculty, where Recovery College trainers’ expertise in co-production and peer facilitation were foregrounded. The aim of this study is to understand how nursing students experienced being peer facilitators of well-being workshops for fellow students following training with Recovery College trainers.

Design/methodology/approach

Thematic analysis of qualitative data from eight semi-structured interviews and a focus group with 15 participants.

Findings

The overarching theme that emerged was “The process of being a student Peer Facilitator”. Six themes emerged from the data: “What we brought”; “Conceptualisation”; “Adaptation”; “we’re giving them the tools”; “What we gained”; and “Development”.

Practical implications

Mental health nurse educators could forge collaborative relationships with Recovery College colleagues with a broader remit than service users’ “lived experience” of mental distress. Student nurses should be given opportunities to be peer facilitators and draw on their lived experience as student nurses as means of addressing their and their peers’ mental health.

Originality/value

Original findings were that the student experience of being a peer facilitator was different to their other experiences in education and clinical practice. They drew on their lived experience throughout and found that they learned skills to address their well-being through supporting other students to improve theirs.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Kumari Rashmi and Aakanksha Kataria

The purpose of this study is to empirically investigate the mediating effect of work-life balance (WLB) in the relationship between three significant job resources…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically investigate the mediating effect of work-life balance (WLB) in the relationship between three significant job resources (namely, job autonomy, supervisor support and co-worker support) and job satisfaction experienced by frontline nursing professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic in an Indian setting using the theoretical foundation of job demands-resources theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured questionnaire survey has been used to get the responses from 452 nursing professionals in India during the COVID-19 pandemic. To carry out data analysis structural equation modeling has been used.

Findings

The results reveal the relationship between the framed hypotheses. Surprisingly, the relationship between all three job resources and WLB was found to be positive, and also WLB was positively associated with nursing professionals’ job satisfaction during pandemic situations. However, WLB partially mediated the relationship only between two job resources (namely, job autonomy and supervisor support) and job satisfaction.

Originality/value

The research paper addresses Indian nursing professionals’ perceptions of job resources, WLB and job satisfaction during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper seeks to examine such a relationship when nursing professionals’ worked round the clock with intuitive expertise and cautiousness to provide quality care and responded more efficiently to scarce resource situations.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2021

Annick Hortense Dominique Van Rossem

The present research offers insights into the generational stereotypical beliefs that different generations of nurses hold about the own and the other generations and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The present research offers insights into the generational stereotypical beliefs that different generations of nurses hold about the own and the other generations and the implications on the work floor.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional, exploratory study employs a cognitive mapping approach known as the repertory grid. The sample consisted of 15 Generation Y, 15 Generation X and 15 Baby Boomer nurses.

Findings

Beliefs of nurses about their own and the other generations direct social categorization and generational stereotypes of the in-group and out groups. These stereotypes mold nurses' beliefs and attitudes towards their coworkers and are enacted leading to self-fulfilling prophecies. Especially Generation Y and Baby Boomer nurses are negatively stereotyped and have their ways to deal with these negative stereotypes.

Practical implications

Nurses and their managers who hold generational stereotypes may unknowingly create cliques within an organization and adopt behaviors and expectations based on generational (self-) stereotypes. The author offers noteworthy insights for fostering intergenerational synergies amongst nurses, which are important since the level of interdependent relations amongst nurses required to provide care.

Originality/value

The present study moves away from the research about the typical characteristics of nurses across the generational workforce. Instead, mental models about how different generations of nurses construe their coworkers belonging to different generations including their own generation are drawn. Employing the repertory grid technique (RGT), an established method for uncovering people's personal and collective belief systems, the present study shows how generational stereotyping and self-stereotyping among nurses belonging to varying generational cohorts occurs and debates its implications.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

Ghulam Murtaza Rafique and Khalid Mahmood

The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of knowledge sharing (KS) at work place on the individual work performance (IWP) of nurses.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of knowledge sharing (KS) at work place on the individual work performance (IWP) of nurses.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional quantitative approach based on a survey questionnaire was used to collect data from currently working 256 nurses in 6 general public sector hospitals of Lahore, Pakistan. Equal sized convenient sampling technique was used to select the sample from the intended population. Multiple regression was applied to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicated that the elements of IWP (task and contextual performance) were positively correlated with and influenced by two facets of KS (KS propensity and KS behavior). A cohesive sharing culture among nurses must be established at their respective work places to foster the delivery of quality care services and to improve their performance.

Practical implications

The study findings suggest that health-care institutes must consider the importance of KS to boost up the sharing culture among all levels (s) of employees by establishing an interconnected learning environment for improved work performance.

Originality/value

KS plays a vital role in the learning and development of employees by enhancing their work performance. The extant literature showed that there was a dearth of studies that determined the impact of KS at work place on the IWP of nurses. As KS has unique and challenging factors in Pakistan, therefore, the investigation of its impact on nurses’ work performance would be worthy.

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Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Jayne Krisjanous and Christine Hallett

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how a historical event packaged as an iconic heritage cultural brand can be marketized and modified over time to ensure brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how a historical event packaged as an iconic heritage cultural brand can be marketized and modified over time to ensure brand longevity and continued emotional commitment and loyalty through the leverage of stories and associations more closely aligned with modern-day audiences. The authors do this through examining the marketization of the New Zealand World War 1 (WWI) nurse to today’s audiences. The periods of study are WWI (1914–1918) and then the modern day. The New Zealand Army Nursing Service (NZANS) during WWI has previously had little attention as a key actor in the Australia and New Zealand Army Corp (ANZAC), Today ANZAC is held as pivotal in the birth of New Zealand’s perception of nationhood and as an iconic heritage cultural brand. The history and legend of the ANZAC plays an important role in New Zealand culture and is fundamental to the “Anzac Spirit”, a signifier of what it means to be a New Zealander.

Design/methodology/approach

A historical case study method is used. The primary source of data is 1914–1918, and includes contemporaneous articles, and personal writings: diaries, letters and published memoirs. More contemporary works form the basis for discussion of marketization as it relates to the NZANS. The article first presents conceptual framing, then the development of the Anzac brand and the history of the NZANS and its role in WWI before turning to discussion on the marketization of this nursing service to today’s audiences and as part of the ANZAC/Anzac brand.

Findings

Today the story of the WWI NZANS nurse, previously seldom heard, has been co-opted and is becoming increasingly merged as an integral part of the Anzac story. The history of the NZANS during WWI has a great deal of agency today as part of that story, serving many functions within it and providing a valuable lever for marketization.

Originality/value

To date, there is a scarcity of marketing analysis that examines the marketization of history. By focusing on New Zealand WWI nursing as a contributor to the Anzac story, the authors contribute to the understanding of how marketers package and contemporize history for appeal to audiences through both sustaining and reworking cultural branding.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Lisa E. Baranik, Yue Zhu, Mo Wang and Wei Zhuang

Research has found that the effects of directly experiencing mistreatment at work are consistently negative; however, results from studies examining employees' reactions…

Abstract

Purpose

Research has found that the effects of directly experiencing mistreatment at work are consistently negative; however, results from studies examining employees' reactions to witnessing mistreatment are less consistent. This study focuses on nurses witnessing patient mistreatment in order to examine how third parties respond when witnessing patients mistreating co-workers. We argue that nurses high on other-orientation are less likely to experience emotion exhaustion in the face of witnessing patient mistreatment, whereas nurses high on self-concern are more likely to experience emotional exhaustion. We further argue that the indirect effect of witnessing patient mistreatment on job performance through emotional exhaustion is moderated by other-orientation and self-concern.

Design/methodology/approach

We used data collected at two time points, with six months apart, from 287 nurses working in a hospital. The study tests the hypotheses by using multiple regression analyses.

Findings

Emotional exhaustion mediated the relationships between witnessing patient mistreatment and two forms of job performance: patient care behaviors and counterproductive work behaviors. Furthermore, other-orientation moderated these indirect relationships such that the indirect relationships were weaker when other-orientation was high (vs. low). Self-concern did not moderate these relationships.

Practical implications

Service and care-oriented businesses may protect their employees from the risk of burnout by promoting prosocial orientation among their patient and customer-facing employees.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by demonstrating the detrimental effects of witnessing patient mistreatment on nurses' performance. It also extends the current understanding of why and when witnessing patient mistreatment is related to performance by demonstrating the joint effects of witnessing patient mistreatment and an individual difference construct, other-orientation on employees' performance.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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