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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Min Ji, Shuhai Liu and Huaping Xiao

The purpose of this paper is to study the tribology behavior of steel–steel contact under the lubrication of water-based drilling mud with different oleic acid-filled…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the tribology behavior of steel–steel contact under the lubrication of water-based drilling mud with different oleic acid-filled microcapsules as lubricant additives.

Design/methodology/approach

A ball-on-disc tribometer was used to evaluate the lubrication properties of the steel–steel contact. The wear tracks of the worn surfaces were observed by a scanning electron microscope.

Findings

Results show that the dependence of both friction and wear on the category of additives shares a consistent pattern. In contrast to oleic acid and empty microcapsules, oleic acid-filled microcapsules achieve the best tribological performance which is related to the lubricant effect of oleic acid and the isolation and rolling abilities of microcapsules.

Practical implications

This study provides a helpful method of encapsulated lubricant additives to prolong lubrication performance for steel–steel contact.

Originality/value

This study has applied microcapsules to improve the tribological properties of drilling mud.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/ILT-08-2019-0320/

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 72 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Dezun Sheng, Tao Ni, Ming Zou and Huichen Zhang

This paper aims to investigate the effect of laser surface texturing on the tribological performance of Ti-6Al-4V disks sliding against Si3N4 balls under…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of laser surface texturing on the tribological performance of Ti-6Al-4V disks sliding against Si3N4 balls under hydroxyethyl-cellulose water-based lubrication. The friction coefficients and wear losses of textured and untextured disks were measured and compared. The results indicate that the texture patterns can lead to reduction of friction and wear in the condition of water-based lubrication.

Design/methodology/approach

Solutions of hydroxyethyl cellulose were used as water-based lubricants. To find the optimal laser texturing parameters for the best performance enhancement, three line-like patterns were fabricated onto the disks and three machining parameters were used for each type of pattern. Tribological tests were conducted in rotation sliding with ball-on-disk contact configuration on UMT-2.

Findings

A higher density of texture lines leads to a larger friction and wear reduction. Compared with untextured disks, the friction coefficient is reduced from 0.043 to 0.028 for textured disks. Some unworn parts were detected in the contact region of the balls against textured disks, which were not found on the balls against untextured disks. The worn surfaces indicated that periodic geometry of the contact track was rebuilt during run-in period, which was beneficial for the formation of lubricant films.

Originality/value

In this work, laser surface texturing was used to reduce the friction and wear of Ti-6Al-4V specimens in water-based lubrication, which can be used to improve the tribological performance of Ti-6Al-4V components in mechanical equipment.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 71 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Yong Wan, Yankun Yu, Shuai Gao and Jianguo Gao

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate naturally occurring phytic acid (PA) as a green-water-based lubricant.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate naturally occurring phytic acid (PA) as a green-water-based lubricant.

Design/methodology/approach

Lubrication is studied using a ball-on-disk tribometer with silica glass against silicon nitride contact, and the friction coefficient and wear are measured in the boundary lubrication regimes.

Findings

Excellent lubrication performance was found by using PA aqueous solutions. After the running-in process, the sliding coefficient of friction could drop to as low as 0.01 with a quite low concentration of 7.5 × 10−4 M. The lubricating performance of PA solution could be further improved by increasing PA concentration. The work suggests that the excellent lubricity of PA in aqueous solution can be mostly contributed to its adsorption on the silica surface.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the natural products could be used as water-based lubricant additives.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 69 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Jian Fang, Yubin Sun, Yanqiu Xia and Weimin Liu

The purpose of this paper is to understand the effect of base media on the tribological performance and tribochemistry of bismuth thiophosphate additive.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the effect of base media on the tribological performance and tribochemistry of bismuth thiophosphate additive.

Design/methodology/approach

The oil‐water double soluble additive bismuth dithiophosphate was prepared and identified. The contributions of the two base media on the additive tribological behavior and the tribofilm components were comparatively studied.

Findings

The extreme pressure (EP) and friction‐reducing properties are remarkably improved with water substituted for paraffin as the base medium. The EP performance of the lubricating media containing this additive mainly results from the tribochemical reaction film on the rubbing surface, not from the viscosity of the base media. In water or paraffin medium, the adsorption process of this additive from the lubricant bulk onto the rubbing surface and the components and the properties of the tribochemical reaction films formed are different, which have important effect on the tribological performance.

Research limitations/implications

The paper mainly focuses on how the water medium with polarity and the liquid paraffin base medium with non‐polarity affect on the tribological performance of the bismuth thiophosphate additive.

Practical implications

The research has found a water‐oil double soluble lubrication additive with outstanding EP and friction‐reducing performance.

Originality/value

The designed experiment provides a new approach to further learn the action mechanism of thiophosphate additive.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 62 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Abstract

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 61 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Jianhua Wang, Jinlong Li, Xiaobo Wang and Weimin Liu

The purpose of this paper is to prepare water‐soluble TiO2 nanoparticles and evaluate the tribological properties as additives in water.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to prepare water‐soluble TiO2 nanoparticles and evaluate the tribological properties as additives in water.

Design/methodology/approach

Nanoparticles present excellent friction‐reducing and antiwear properties as additives in base oils. However, there are seldom literatures about the nanoparticles as additives in water as yet. In this work, water‐soluble TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by sol‐gel method and characterized with transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The tribological properties as additives in water were investigated by SRV and the surface analysis by scanning electron microscope and X‐ray photon electron spectroscope.

Findings

TiO2 nanoparticles modified with polyethylene glycol have uniform size about 10 nm and easily dissolve in water. The tribological experiments showed TiO2 nanoparticles exhibit excellent friction‐reducing and antiwear properties.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is restricted to only TiO2 nanoparticles. Some other water‐soluble nanoparticles also should be prepared and their tribological properties investigated.

Practical implications

Water‐soluble TiO2 nanoparticles could be used as water additives and improve the tribological properties.

Originality/value

This paper emphasises that the water‐soluble nanoparticles are prepared and could be used as water additives.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 62 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1961

A paper with the above title was presented by P. E. B. Vaile, A.M.I.Mech.E., for discussion at a meeting of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers at the Social Club of…

Abstract

A paper with the above title was presented by P. E. B. Vaile, A.M.I.Mech.E., for discussion at a meeting of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers at the Social Club of Hoffmann Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Chelmsford, on 14th September. The paper was sponsored by the Lubrication Group in conjunction with the Nuclear Energy Group. We give here extracts from this paper. Copies of the complete paper are available from The Institution of Mechanical Engineers, 1 Birdcage Walk, London, S.W.1., who invite written communications thereon, which should reach them not later than 31st October. The first part of this paper dealt with industrial power reactors of the CO2 cooled, graphite‐moderated types, high‐temperature gas‐cooled types, etc., and gave details of the U.K.A.E.A. requirements for nuclear lubricants.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 13 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

M. Stanford and P.M. Lister

New environmental legislation is forcing companies to realign their use of metalworking fluids in favour of non‐polluting cutting environments that will return acceptable…

Abstract

New environmental legislation is forcing companies to realign their use of metalworking fluids in favour of non‐polluting cutting environments that will return acceptable tool wear rates and reduced costs. Studies have been undertaken to determine the effectiveness of various environments on tool wear, in order to either reduce or even eliminate totally, the dependency on flood coolants. Industrially reproducible cutting tests were devised, where an EN32 case hardening steel material was turned in a range of different cutting environments and tool life measured. Low oxygen gaseous environments were compared with conventional cutting environments and a 55 per cent flank wear reduction has been recorded using uncoated tooling.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 56 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

M. Stanford and P.M. Lister

As more stringent environmental legislation is enforced throughout Europe manufacturing businesses, employing metal cutting processes, can no longer ignore the growing…

Abstract

As more stringent environmental legislation is enforced throughout Europe manufacturing businesses, employing metal cutting processes, can no longer ignore the growing importance of environmental aspects relating to cutting fluids. Businesses, through market forces, are being forced into offering a “clean solution” to the metal cutting processes which they operate. Cutting fluids despite playing an important role in metal cutting, have considerable environmental impact. There is a need therefore to understand the role of cutting fluids within the cutting process in order to evaluate possible environmentally friendly alternatives to the use of cutting fluids. In order to achieve this the operating environment in which the process is being carried out, and the consequences of removing the cutting fluid from the process altogether has to be assessed. This paper therefore, reflects on the role of cutting fluid and the implications of their use. Viable methods of reducing cutting fluid consumption are also reported, together with efficient methods of cutting fluid utilisation (e.g. minimum quantity delivery systems). Finally, the difficulties experienced in removing cutting fluids from the metal cutting process are highlighted through the consideration of dry cutting technologies.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 54 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

M. Stanford and P.M. Lister

Cutting fluids despite playing an important role in metal cutting have considerable environmental impact. Inert gaseous metal cutting environments were investigated with…

Abstract

Purpose

Cutting fluids despite playing an important role in metal cutting have considerable environmental impact. Inert gaseous metal cutting environments were investigated with the aim of removing soluble oil cutting fluids from metal cutting operations.Design/methodology/approach – Industrially reproducible cutting tests were devised, where an austenitic stainless steel and En32 low carbon steel material was milled in a range of different cutting environments. Tool life was measured for tests carried out in a number of gaseous environments and results were then compared with test results from conventional flood cutting environments.Findings – Low oxygen gaseous environments were compared with conventional cutting environments and a considerable flank wear reduction has been recorded using CVD coated tooling. Additionally flood coolant environments have been seen to promote chemical wear after the initial breakdown of coatings leading to rapid flank wear during milling of both En32 and austenitic stainless steel.Research limitations/implications – Only a limited number of work/tool material combinations have been investigated. A more detailed and exhaustive investigation is required to ascertain the scope of the improvements for a range of tool work combinations. This will assist in understanding the underlying reasoning for the tool life enhancement reported.Practical implications – All experimentation carried out is industrially reproducible. This work, therefore, proposes an environmentally clean alternative to the use of emulsified oils in metal cutting operations in order to exploit cost savings and improved operator working environments.Originality/value – Distinct operational performance improvements have been demonstrated in the form of extended tool life for metal cutting operations performed in a non‐polluting cutting environment. These findings could herald widespread advantages within the metal cutting community.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 57 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

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