Search results

1 – 10 of over 8000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Isaac Cheah and Ian Phau

This paper aims to identify the key antecedents and moderators that influence consumers' willingness to purchase environmentally friendly products.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the key antecedents and moderators that influence consumers' willingness to purchase environmentally friendly products.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sampling method was employed. A total of 600 self‐administered questionnaires were distributed during lectures in a large Australian university. In total, 256 useable Australian consumer responses were collected and used for analysis.

Findings

The results show that the three antecedents of ecoliteracy, interpersonal influence and value orientation have strong correlations with attitudes towards environmentally friendly products. Consumers with favourable attitudes towards environmentally friendly products are more likely to purchase environmentally friendly products. Perceived product necessity moderates the relationship between attitudes toward environmentally friendly products and the willingness to purchase environmentally friendly products.

Research limitations/implications

Longitudinal studies can be conducted in the future. Other possible moderating factors such as product involvement or pricing can also be explored. A wider range of behavioural indicators can be used to capture a more accurate measurement of environmentally oriented behaviours.

Practical implications

Consumer education about the environment is crucial for consumers to form a more favourable mindset towards environmentally friendly products. Communication initiatives that highlight various environmental support campaigns and environmentally conscious product strategies are some of the ways to encourage purchasing behaviour.

Originality/value

The study empirically examines the antecedents and consequences of attitudes towards purchasing green products in an Australian context. Furthermore, the study uses day‐to‐day necessity products as the product category.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Kamyar Kianpour, Ahmad Jusoh and Maryam Asghari

The purpose of this paper is to extend the existing dimensions of product quality to cover ecological phenomena. It proposes adding a new dimension – environmentally

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the existing dimensions of product quality to cover ecological phenomena. It proposes adding a new dimension – environmentally friendly – to the existing dimensions of product quality in order to help solve environmental issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The main focus of the literature review is on product quality dimensions. The authors discuss each dimension separately to clarify whether there is any consideration given to producing environmentally friendly products which can directly contribute to product quality dimensions. The population of this study was chosen from consumers, since their demands and expectations play a significant role in producing green products. A stratified sampling method was used and the sample size was selected according to the Morgan table of sampling. Factor analysis was conducted on the collected data to determine the underlying factors of product quality.

Findings

The results indicate that consumers are more concerned about environmental issues in recent decades, and they responded that environmentally friendly is an important part of a product along with other dimensions of product quality which should be considered by manufacturers and producers.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first studies which explores consumers’ opinions on the demand side to examine environmentally friendly capability as a new dimension of product quality.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Lu Xu, Victor Prybutok and Charles Blankson

This paper posits, develops and tests the effects of general environmental awareness factors on consumers’ intentions in the Environmental Awareness Purchasing Intention…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper posits, develops and tests the effects of general environmental awareness factors on consumers’ intentions in the Environmental Awareness Purchasing Intention Model. Environmental awareness is tested within the context of purchasing vehicles and, thus, vehicle relevant factors (perceived quality and self-image) are also included. Further, the purpose of this paper is to explain the relative contribution of general environmental awareness factors on purchasing intentions compared to quality and self-image.

Design/methodology/approach

The main thrust of the research involved a survey of 248 young automobile buyers from a large public university in Texas, USA. The data were analyzed using both multiple regression and partial least square-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

Environmental attitude has a positive impact on purchasing intention, while perceived control toward environmentally responsible behavior has a negative impact. Results also show a positive impact of quality and self-image on intention to purchase environmentally friendly cars. Furthermore, the results reveal that environmental awareness factors explain less variance than perceived quality. At the same time, the results show that environmental factors, relatively, explain more variance in the decision-making process than self-image.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the relationship between general environmental awareness and the intention to purchase an environmentally friendly car. This study contributes to sustainable consumption literature in operations management. The paper also provides insights for developing managerial guidelines for car manufacturers based on the understanding of factors influencing environmentally friendly car purchasing intentions.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 119 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

D.H.P. Verbeek, A. Bargeman and J.T. Mommaas

The European Alpine region is an important tourism destination that at the same time faces environmental challenges. In aiming for a sustainable development of Alpine…

Abstract

Purpose

The European Alpine region is an important tourism destination that at the same time faces environmental challenges. In aiming for a sustainable development of Alpine tourism, tourism boards and municipalities of 22 villages cooperate in the Alpine Pearls (AP) association. The main goal of the AP association is to develop an integrated, continuous passage for sustainable tourism mobility, which improves the possibilities for environmentally friendly travel to, between, and in the Alpine Pearls villages. This paper aims to focus on whether and how this “passage” enables tourists to travel smoothly, problem‐free and environmentally friendly to and in the Alpine region.

Design/methodology/approach

To analyse the Alpine Pearls holiday, the authors use a theoretical framework based on the social practices approach (SPA), which offers a contextual approach to consumption behaviour. The dynamics between travellers and providers of sustainable tourism and travel services along the passage of the Alpine Pearls holiday are the main interest. Data have been gathered through participant observation and interviews with informants.

Findings

The research points, among other things, to the fact that the creation of a passage for environmental‐friendly Alpine holidays is complicated by the nationally organised railway infrastructures and the sectorially organised tourism industry.

Originality/value

Evaluating sustainable tourism mobility passages on the level of holiday practices is a new contextual approach that can be of value to both tourism scholars and the tourism industry.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 66 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Ya-Ling Chen

This research examines the lodging experience in the context of environmentally friendly hotels by discovering the underlying guest segments. A mixed-method approach is…

Abstract

This research examines the lodging experience in the context of environmentally friendly hotels by discovering the underlying guest segments. A mixed-method approach is deployed, which first reveals three lodging experience dimensions entailing, functionality, hedonism and social responsibility via in-depth interviews. Subsequently, a questionnaire survey is conducted which gathers responses from 326 guests staying at seven certified green hotels. A cluster analysis based on green lodging experiences is performed that evokes three distinct guest segments labeled as (1) spontaneous guests, (2) active guests, and (3) devoted guests. The study notes that social responsibility is the most important lodging experience across the three resultant segments. The study also finds about 31% of respondents tend not to pay much attention to green lodging operations. It leads to a suggestion that the implementation of green operations may be accomplished in a way not notably compromising certain service expectations by those not profusely aspiring of the notion of green operations. Even though meeting the needs of core customers is a vital task.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-488-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Lorena Carrete, Raquel Castaño, Reto Felix, Edgar Centeno and Eva González

The purpose of this research is to contribute to a better understanding of deeper motivations and inhibitors of green consumer behavior in the context of emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to contribute to a better understanding of deeper motivations and inhibitors of green consumer behavior in the context of emerging economies. Based on the findings, it aims to provide implications for marketers and policy making.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an ethnographic approach, in‐depth interviews and observational data were used to study 15 Mexican families from four urban regions of Mexico with different incomes. Thematic analysis was used to develop and validate themes and codes.

Findings

The findings highlight three dominant themes related to uncertainty in the adoption of environmentallyfriendly behaviors: consumer confusion, trust and credibility, and compatibility. Overall, green behaviors seem to be ingrained in the traditional heritage of savings and frugality rather than based on strong environmental values. It is suggested that the factors that drive consumers from positive attitudes and intentions to the actual adoption of green behaviors are a combination of perceived personal benefits, decreased perceived risk and uncertainty, a sense of control over costs, and a decomposition and reconstruction of deeply embedded cultural values and practices.

Practical implications

Policy makers and marketers are advised to build on collaborative efforts in order to facilitate comprehension and adoption of environmentallyfriendly behaviors and green products. In order to construct modernity alongside environmental responsibility, it seems indispensable to provide affordable lower‐priced alternatives for the low‐income segments of the market which constitute the vast majority of the population in emerging economies.

Originality/value

Being one of very few available qualitative studies on green consumer behavior, this study delves into the tension between modernity and traditional heritage in the context of emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Chi-Hung Chung, Dickson K.W. Chiu, Kevin K.W. Ho and Cheuk Hang Au

This study aims to explore how social media help promote environmental education and pro-environmental behaviours by analysing how young adults access social media and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how social media help promote environmental education and pro-environmental behaviours by analysing how young adults access social media and traditional media to obtain environmental information differently, how environmental ideas are disseminated through social media and how people perceive and realise environmentalism.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative study based on a semi-structured interview with student participants. The questions used in the interview were developed by on the integrated waste reduction model by Nishio and Takeuchi (2005) and the enhanced model proposed by Ho et al. (2019).

Findings

The results indicate that young adults agree and accept that living environmentally friendly lifestyles is an important goal. Although they acquire environmental information from social media, they seldom share or interact with those social media posts. This behaviour implies that they are information receivers when dealing with such contents.

Originality/value

The finding of this study provides insight for stakeholders on how to promote related knowledge and encourage people to be “greener” more often and construct a friendlier atmosphere for fostering more in-depth environmental discussions on social media.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ester M.V. Pereira, Reidar J. Mykletun and Camilla Hippolyte

This paper aims to explore relationships between consumers' sustainable purchasing practices and their related cognitions, evaluations, and beliefs when considering…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore relationships between consumers' sustainable purchasing practices and their related cognitions, evaluations, and beliefs when considering purchases of tourist products or general goods.

Design/methodology/approach

“Cognitions” refers to consumers' familiarity with the concept of “environmentallyfriendly”, their “evaluations” are considerations of the importance of responsible practices, and “beliefs” are convictions of the effects of buying environmentallyfriendly products. Data were collected by questionnaires distributed to convenience samples of 142 passers by on streets close to museums, parks, and other recreational facilities.

Findings

The cognitive, evaluative, and belief dimensions were interrelated and supposedly reflect positive attitudes and/or motivations towards sustainability. These “inclinations‐to‐act variables” were positively related to the appreciation of sustainability in daily purchases, vacation purchases, and tourism provider profiles. The importance of history and culture in relation to tourism purchases was also examined. Sustainability orientation in daily purchases also correlated to vacation purchases and appreciation of tourism providers with sustainability‐oriented profiles.

Research limitations/implications

The study used a small convenience sample and did not measure actual purchasing behavior. Future research should explore the relation between the variables examined in this paper and actual purchasing behavior in a larger random sample of the general population.

Originality/value

Previous related research involved respondents on vacation travel or as non‐representative samples. This study demonstrates relationships between consumers' sustainable purchasing practices of tourist products or general goods and their related cognitions, evaluations, and beliefs when sampling from populations in general.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Selcuk Ekici

This study aims to ascertain the greenest helicopters by modeling joint parameters to make sense of induced emissions effects of helicopters allocated to various categories.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to ascertain the greenest helicopters by modeling joint parameters to make sense of induced emissions effects of helicopters allocated to various categories.

Design/methodology/approach

Emission indexes of helicopters construct the pillars of the methodology under use. Three different parameters are derived from emission indices: the index showing grams of pollutants that an engine produces per kWh; the index comparing of pollutant mass depending on the energy content of the fuel; and the index expressing the presence of the unreacted hydrocarbon (unburned) released into the atmosphere as a result of the combustion reaction.

Findings

Various helicopters have been designated as sensitive and insensitive to the environment under various conditions and in different categories. Details are in the conclusions section.

Practical implications

This study includes methods that can be used to select environmentally sensitive helicopters of various categories according to specific pollutants and their combustion efficiency.

Originality/value

The originality of the work lies in the determination of the most sensitive and insensitive to the environment by using true flight data of helicopters operating in various categories during different flight phases. In addition, this paper with an approach to identifying green helicopters has the capability to support studies on regulations for helicopters in some countries by policymakers.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Kerstin Bergström, Cecilia Solér and Helena Shanahan

Food consumption impacts heavily on the environment. It is therefore highly relevant to study food‐purchasing processes and needs for environmental information in the food…

Abstract

Purpose

Food consumption impacts heavily on the environment. It is therefore highly relevant to study food‐purchasing processes and needs for environmental information in the food supply chain. The objective of this article is to report findings from a study identifying practices in using environmental information when making decisions on what food to procure and purchase.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a phenomenographic approach, professional purchasing managers at food production companies and wholesalers in public and commercial food services as well as retailing were interviewed with the aim of identifying practices when using environmental information in decisions on what food to procure for purchasing.

Findings

The findings show that purchasers are dependent on corporate policy when it comes to environmental considerations related to food. Purchasers are mainly guided by business parameters with respect to price, quality and service. These factors are given priority over co‐operation along the food supply chain. Such co‐operation has been shown to have the potential to encourage environmentally friendly purchasing decisions.

Originality/value

The study places the issue of the use of and need for environmental information in the food supply chain on the national agenda in Sweden. Thus, the study contributes to increasing the awareness of the importance of professional food purchasers as actors for change towards more environmentally friendly food consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 8000