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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2021

Zhiqiang Huang, Zhongquan Yin and Wei Wu

The purpose of this study is to solve the oil drill pipe joints and casing excessive wear problems and to improve the drill pipe joint-casing wear resistance and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to solve the oil drill pipe joints and casing excessive wear problems and to improve the drill pipe joint-casing wear resistance and anti-friction properties.

Design/methodology/approach

On the surface of the drill pipe joints using oxyacetylene flame bead weld (BW) wear-resistant welding wire ARNCO-100XTTM prepares welding layer, high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) Cr3C275-NiCr25 prepares coating and subsonic flame spray and remelt (SFSR) Ni60 prepares coating, then comparing and analyzing the friction and wear of the three types of wear-resistant layers and the casing under the condition of 1.8 g/cm3 mud drilling fluid lubrication. The wear resistance and anti-friction performance of the drill pipe joints were evaluated based on the wear situation, finally revealing its friction and wear mechanisms.

Findings

Three types of wear-resistant layers can improve the surface wear resistance of drill pipe joints, the wear-resistant layer and the substrate are well combined and the welding layers and coating are both dense and uniform. The wear resistance of the HVOF-Cr3C275-NiCr25 coating is 10.9 times that of the BW-ARNCO-100XTTM weld layer, and the wear resistance of the SFSR-Ni60 weld layer is 2.45 times that of the BW-ARNCO-100XTTM weld layer. The anti-friction properties of SFSR-Ni60 welding layer is the best, followed by HVOF-Cr3C275-NiCr25 coating, and the anti-friction properties of BW-ARNCO-100XTTM welding layer is the worst among the three.

Originality/value

The research results of this paper have great practical value in the process and material of improving the wear resistance and anti-friction performance of the drill pipe joint casing.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 73 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

U.R. LENEL

WEAR resistance is never the sole requirement of an engineering material. All engineering components have a function to perform and any particular function will impose a…

Abstract

WEAR resistance is never the sole requirement of an engineering material. All engineering components have a function to perform and any particular function will impose a series of requirements on the material of manufacture. In the search for improved wear resistance, these other requirements must never be forgotten: no industrially useful material will survive on wear resistance alone.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1971

P.L. HURRICKS

WEAR is one of the major ways by which a material part ceases to be useful, others are corrosion, obsolescence and breakage. It is the consequence of relative motion and…

Abstract

WEAR is one of the major ways by which a material part ceases to be useful, others are corrosion, obsolescence and breakage. It is the consequence of relative motion and in industrial plant and equipment it has always been accepted as inevitable that it should lead to heavy expenditure for maintenance and replacement. Historically, wear is a well established fact, yet our knowledge of the technology is extremely limited. It has become a way of life that we compensate for wear when it no longer can be tolerated, yet need this be so? This article examines the problem, and primarily from the unlubricated point of view, describes the various types of wear and the way material selection or modification can be used to limit wear.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 23 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Bilal Kurşuncu

The effect of cryogenic heat treatment on the mechanical properties of different materials has been frequently investigated by researchers in recent years. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The effect of cryogenic heat treatment on the mechanical properties of different materials has been frequently investigated by researchers in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to investigate wear behaviour of monolayer, multilayer and nanocomposite coatings after cryogenic heat treatment. It is a first in its field in terms of both the heat treatment used and the coatings examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The aCN/TiAlN, TiAlN and ncTiAlSiN hard coatings deposited on the AISI D2 steel substrate were subjected to cryogenic heat treatment at −145oC and −196oC for 24 h and then tempered at 200oC for 2 h. Then, the samples were subjected to wear tests of 5, 10 and 15 N three different load values. The wear mechanisms occurring on the wear surfaces were determined by scanning electron microscope supported by EDS.

Findings

Oxidation, fatigue and delamination wear mechanisms were realized on the surfaces of the samples subjected to dry sliding wear test. The wear resistance of S1 increased with cryogenic heat treatment. According to the wear test results of the untreated samples, it was found that the samples with lower hardness than the others had higher wear resistance. The wear resistance of S1 and S2 samples was increased by cryogenic heat treatment. The best wear resistance in all parameters was obtained by S1. Oxidation in the S1 was found to have a positive effect on wear resistance. According to EDS results after wear of S2, chromium-rich layer was found on the surface of the material. It is understood that cryogenic heat treatment causes carbide precipitation in the inner structure of the substrate material.

Originality/value

The effect of cryogenic heat treatment on the mechanical properties of different materials has been frequently investigated by researchers in recent years. In this study, wear behaviour of monolayer, multilayer and nanocomposite coatings after cryogenic heat treatment was investigated. It is a first in its field in terms of both the heat treatment used and the coatings examined.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/ILT-03-2020-0111/

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 73 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

De‐Xing Peng, Yuan Kang, Zheng‐Xian Li and Shih‐Yen Chang

The purpose of this paper is to test the wear behavior of a carbon steel surface after cladding by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) method to enhance wear resistance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the wear behavior of a carbon steel surface after cladding by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) method to enhance wear resistance.

Design/methodology/approach

The microstructures, chemical compositions, and wear characteristics of cladded surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X‐ray spectroscopy (EDX). A rotating‐type tribometer was used to evaluate the wear characteristics of cladded specimens under dry sliding conditions at room temperature. The dry sliding wear resistance of the coatings was tested as a function of applied load and sliding time, and wear mechanisms were elucidated by analyzing wear surfaces.

Findings

The experimental results revealed an excellent metallurgical bond between the composite coating and substrate. The coating was uniform, continuous, and almost defect‐free, and particles were evenly distributed throughout the cladding layer. Hardness was increased from 200 HV in the substrate to 650‐800 HV in the modified layer due to the presence of the hard TiC phase. The excellent wear resistance and very low load sensitivity observed in the dry sliding wear test of the intermetallic matrix composite coating were due to the high hardness of TiC and the strong atomic bonds of the intermetallic matrix.

Originality/value

The experiments in this study confirm that, by reducing friction and anti‐wear, the cladding layer prepared using the proposed methods can prolong machinery operating life.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 65 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

De‐Xing Peng

The purpose of this paper is to test whether TiC clad layer deposited on carbon steel by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) improves carbon steel substrate wear resistance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test whether TiC clad layer deposited on carbon steel by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) improves carbon steel substrate wear resistance.

Design/methodology/approach

Cladding microstructure and cladded surface hardness were tested in samples prepared under varying welding parameters. The chemical composition, microstructure and surface morphology of the cladded layer were analyzed by optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X‐ray spectroscopy. The wear behavior of the cladded layer was studied with a block‐on‐ring tribometer. Wear mechanisms in the specimens are discussed based on microscopic study of wear surface characteristics.

Findings

The experimental results revealed an excellent metallurgical bond between the composite coating and substrate. Hardness was increased from HRb 6.6 in the substrate to HRb 65 in the modified layer due to the presence of the hard TiC phase. Experimental comparison of varying welding parameters revealed that welding speed and current had the largest effect on the hardness and wear resistance of the cladded layer.

Originality/value

The paper shows that by using cladding techniques to improve surface properties such as resistances to wear, corrosion, and oxidation, service life can be increased, and machinery costs can be reduced.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 64 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

De-Xing Peng

This paper aims to compare the wear performance of carbon steel specimens clad with TiC, WC and TiN powders by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) method under optimum…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare the wear performance of carbon steel specimens clad with TiC, WC and TiN powders by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) method under optimum processing conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

Various ceramic powders (TiC, WC and TiN) with equal percentages by weight were prepared for use as cladding materials to compare their effects on wear resistance. The wear behaviors of different cladding specimens were evaluated with a rotating-type tribometer under dry sliding conditions. The cladding microstructures were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry.

Findings

The experimental results confirmed that the hardness was also much higher in the carbon steel with cladding than in carbon steel without cladding. The pin-on-disc wear test showed that the wear-resistance of ceramics clad with TiC is better than that in ceramics clad with WC or TiN. The wear scar area of the specimen with TiC cladding was only one-tenth that of carbon steel without cladding.

Originality/value

The experiments confirm that the cladding surfaces of ceramic particles reduce wear rate and friction.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 66 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Gustavo Tressia, Luis H.D. Alves, Amilton Sinatora, Helio Goldenstein and Mohammad Masoumi

The purpose of this study is to develop a lower bainite structure consists of a dispersion of fine carbide inside plates of bainitic ferrite from chemical composition…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a lower bainite structure consists of a dispersion of fine carbide inside plates of bainitic ferrite from chemical composition unmodified conventional pearlitic steel under bainitic transformation and to investigate its effect on tensile properties and wear resistance.

Design/methodology/approach

A commercial hypereutectoid pearlitic rail steel was subjected to three different bainitic transformation treatments followed by tempering to develop a desirable microstructure with a DIL805 BÄHR dilatometer. A comprehensive microstructural study was performed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Finally, the mechanical properties and wear resistance were evaluated by tensile, microhardness, and pin-on-disc tests.

Findings

The results showed that the best combination of mechanical properties and sliding wear resistance was obtained in the sample subjected to bainitic transformation at 300°C for 600 s followed by tempering at 400°C for 300 s. This sample, which contained a bainitic ferrite structure, exhibited approximately 20% higher hardness and approximately 53% less mass loss than the as-received pearlitic sample due to the mechanically induced transformation in the contact surface.

Originality/value

Although pearlitic steel is widely used in the construction of railways, recent studies have revealed that bainitic transformation at the same rail steels exhibited higher wear resistance and fatigue strengths than conventional pearlitic rail at the same hardness values. Such a bainitic microstructure can improve the mechanical properties and wear resistance, which is a great interest in the railway industry.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/ILT-07-2019-0282/

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 72 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Roman Kaczyński and Leongard I. Pogodaev

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the phenomenon of wear resistance of some metals and alloys with allowance for the stiffness of their stressed‐strained state of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the phenomenon of wear resistance of some metals and alloys with allowance for the stiffness of their stressed‐strained state of the surface.

Design/methodology/approach

An original criterion (in the form of limiting deformation power density) of wear resistance on the basis of structure‐energy theory of friction is proposed. Experimental data on the wear resistance are generalized using the criterion for the conditions of hydroabrasive, impact‐abrasive and cavitational erosion.

Findings

The dependence of the criterion on stiffness coefficient of the stressed‐strained state of the surface of materials is demonstrated. It has been found that an increase of the stiffness results in the reduction in the energy capacity and wear resistance of both metals and alloys investigated.

Practical implications

The structure‐energy criterion can be used for choosing suitable frictional materials and to compare and estimate the theoretical considerations with experimental data.

Originality/value

The proposed structure‐energy approach allows systemizing the results of our analyses and the experimental data.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 58 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Nurullah Kıratlı

The aim of the research is to investigate the influence of gas metal arc welding on the wear performance of worn concussor jaws.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the research is to investigate the influence of gas metal arc welding on the wear performance of worn concussor jaws.

Design/methodology/approach

Worn parts were welded using the gas metal arc welding process. Various wires were used for this purpose. These welded parts were subjected to wear tests under different loads, and changes in the hardness and microstructures were examined. A pin‐on‐disc wear test apparatus was used.

Findings

As a result of this study, the following findings are reported: wear rates were significantly increased with the increasing of load and wear distance; the hardness of the weld metal of the welded specimens changed depending upon the chemical composition of the weld wire; with the increasing carbon, manganese and chromium in the weld wire, wear resistance increased; in the present study, specimens B and C showed better wear resistance; therefore these specimens are suitable for using in concussor jaws.

Research limitations/implications

Electrodes were limited with four wires, for welding gas arc welding methods were applied, loads were limited with 10, 25, 40 N, welded parts were subjected to wear test, hardness test, microstructures were examined.

Practical implications

For future work, instead of buying worn concussor jaws, they are repaired with the gas metal arc welding process using various weld wires. By this process, working life of the jaws can be extended and vast economical benefit may also be obtained.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified information need and offers practical help to the industrial firms working with alunit ore and rock crasher and also to the academicians working on wear of materials.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 57 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

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