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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Daniel M. Gordon and Corwin A. Robertson

The purpose of this paper is to describe the role of the vaccine manufacturer in the global vaccine enterprise.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the role of the vaccine manufacturer in the global vaccine enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

Narrative review.

Findings

Pharmaceutical companies involved in the vaccine enterprise play critical and often unrecognized roles in the global health management arena. In addition to the obvious role of vaccine production and distribution, companies are often involved in the identification of infectious agents for which vaccines may be of benefit, basic and applied research, process development, pre-clinical and clinical evaluations of vaccine candidates, as well as continuous post-licensure safety monitoring efforts. Vaccine manufacturers interact with health and regulatory agencies, academia and agencies interested in supporting cost-effective means of vaccine distribution to areas most in need of life-saving vaccines.

Originality/value

This review provides the reader with an understanding of the many roles of the manufacturer in the global vaccine enterprise.

Expert briefing
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Initial data are expected to become available before the end of the year, and subject to evidence of safety and efficacy, to be submitted for approval and fast-tracked so…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB256851

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 30 November 2022

Juma James Masele and Elia Daud

This study aims to assess the sources of COVID-19 information respondents relied for COVID-19 pandemic information access and use, forms of misinformation and their…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the sources of COVID-19 information respondents relied for COVID-19 pandemic information access and use, forms of misinformation and their influence on COVID-19 vaccine uptake hesitancy among frontline workers.

Design/methodology/approach

A Google Form developed questionnaire, distributed conveniently through link shared through WhatsApp groups was used to collect data from frontline workers from Dar es Salaam and Dodoma cities. Analysis was done using a binary regression analysis.

Findings

It was found that it was not the source that mattered for one to be hesitancy or not on COVID-19 vaccination, but the extent to which the information the source channels was manipulated or false.

Research limitations/implications

Relying only Google Form questionnaire sent through a link on WhatsApp may have compromised the quality of information gathered and the quality of conclusion. Another study may have conducted through researcher administered questionnaire to a bigger sample to increase conclusion reliability and validity.

Practical implications

This study urges that to increase the COVID-19 vaccine uptake, it is important to ensure that the quality of information from the revealed dependable sources is checked to avoid possible consequential disquiet resulting from misinformation.

Originality/value

As the world is striving toward combating the COVID-19 or at least lessening its effects, this paper is of its own kind, using the theory of informative fictions to guide the assessment of the sources of information and the extent to which they influence misinformation on COVID-19 vaccine uptake hesitancy.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 17 October 2022

Vineeta Dwivedi, Malay Krishna and Sunny Vijay Arora

This case is intended to help students of business communication and public relations to trace the effects of communication by public figures and understand essential…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

This case is intended to help students of business communication and public relations to trace the effects of communication by public figures and understand essential elements of designing effective communication. After working through the case and assignment questions, the students will be able to:understand the drivers of vaccine hesitancy;analyze the effects of mass communication on public sentiment, in a fast-changing public health situation; anddesign interventions to influence public awareness and action, using a simple model (5W) for mass communication.

Case overview/synopsis

As the vaccines first arrived after the devastating first wave of the Covid-19 pandemic, Indians hesitated to take the shot. Vaccine hesitancy, a worldwide phenomenon, hampered the uptake of the first Covid vaccines despite the dark clouds of the lethal disease. The case looks at the massive problem of vaccine hesitancy and how an integrated communication strategy could overcome and mitigate the challenge. The case protagonist, the leader of a communications agency, looks at the messaging, medium and platforms needed for strategic communication pitch to combat this vaccine hesitancy.

Complexity academic level

The case was designed for use in a graduate-level course in business communication. This case may be positioned toward the middle or end of the course to illustrate mass communication strategy for pressing and sensitive challenges. The case may also be used in a course on public relations, both at graduate and undergraduate levels.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2022

Daniel Joseph Finkenstadt and Robert Handfield

This study examines the lack of confidence in the actions of the government and pharmaceutical companies during vaccine deployment. The authors introduce the concept of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the lack of confidence in the actions of the government and pharmaceutical companies during vaccine deployment. The authors introduce the concept of supply chain immunity. The authors test whether the perception of higher vaccine supply chain immunity leads to higher willingness to be vaccinated within the supply chain community.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilize factor analysis and item response theory methods to develop a scale for measuring supply chain immunity. The original and psychometrically sound scale is tested via a structural equation model (SEM). Factor analysis and SEM use survey responses from two samples of 125 supply chain executives.

Findings

SEM suggests that supply chain immunity perceptions are a strong predictor of overall supply chain confidence for COVID vaccines. Further, these perceptions, through supply chain confidence, indirectly impact individuals' self-reported willingness to personally accept a vaccine themselves.

Originality/value

This paper presents the concept of supply chain immunity perceptions that have not been used in the medical supply chain literature. This paper presents a first-of-a-kind scale for supply chain immunity perceptions utilizing nascent methods and demonstrates the constructs impact on vaccine program confidence and public willingness to participate.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2022

Akhilesh Kumar, Gaurav Kumar, Tanaya Vijay Ramane and Gurjot Singh

This study proposes strategies for vaccine center allocation for coronavirus disease (COVID) vaccine by determining the number of vaccination stations required for the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study proposes strategies for vaccine center allocation for coronavirus disease (COVID) vaccine by determining the number of vaccination stations required for the vaccination drive, location of vaccination station, assignment of demand group to vaccination station, allocation of the scarce medical professional teams to station and number of optimal days a vaccination station to be functional in a week.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose a mixed-integer nonlinear programming model. However, to handle nonlinearity, the authors devise a heuristic and then propose a two-stage mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) formulation to optimize the allocation of vaccination centers or stations to demand groups in the first stage and the allocation of vaccination centers to cold storage links in the second stage. The first stage optimizes the cost and average distance traveled by people to reach the vaccination center, whereas the second stage optimizes the vaccine’s holding and storage and transportation cost by efficiently allocating cold storage links to the centers.

Findings

The model is studied for the real-world case of Chandigarh, India. The results obtained validate that the proposed approach can immensely help government agencies and policymaking body for a successful vaccination drive. The model tries to find a tradeoff between loss due to underutilized medical teams and the distance traveled by a demand group to get the vaccination.

Originality/value

To the best of our knowledge, there are hardly any studies on a vaccination program at such a scale due to sudden outbreaks such as Covid-19.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2017

Jennifer A. Reich

Public health programs facilitate access to resources that not only provide individuals’ options but also often foreclose individual preference through prescriptive…

Abstract

Public health programs facilitate access to resources that not only provide individuals’ options but also often foreclose individual preference through prescriptive requirements. This chapter takes two disparate cases from public health – vaccines and family planning –that reveal patterns of inequality in who has access to individual choice and who requires state support to exercise choice. Looking specifically at dynamics of funding and compulsion, this chapter elucidates how reliance on the rhetoric of individual choice as an expression of freedom rewards those with the greatest access to resources and fails to make sure that all members of the community have the resources to shape their own outcomes or to make sure collective health is protected.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-811-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2017

Dorit Rubinstein Reiss

Much of the discussion surrounding the antivaccine movement focuses on the decision of parents to not vaccinate their children and the resulting danger posed to others…

Abstract

Much of the discussion surrounding the antivaccine movement focuses on the decision of parents to not vaccinate their children and the resulting danger posed to others. However, the primary risk is borne by the child left unvaccinated. Although living in a developed country with high vaccination rates provides a certain amount of protection through population immunity, the unvaccinated child is still exposed to a considerably greater risk of preventable diseases than one who is vaccinated. I explore the tension between parental choice and the child’s right to be free of preventable diseases. The chapter’s goal is twofold: to advocate for moving from a dyadic framework – considering the interests of the parents against those of the state – to a triadic one, in which the interests of the child are given as much weight as those of the parent and the state; and to discuss which protections are available, and how they can be improved. Specific legal tools available to protect that child are examined, including tort liability of the parents to the child, whether and to what degree criminal law has a role, under what circumstances parental choice should be overridden, and the role of school immunization requirements in protecting the individual child.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-811-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2022

Başak Akar

This chapter argues that neoliberal governmentality in immunization relocates the Turkish state's position regarding vaccine and immunization policies. Neoliberalism is…

Abstract

This chapter argues that neoliberal governmentality in immunization relocates the Turkish state's position regarding vaccine and immunization policies. Neoliberalism is often discussed in the context of privatization, performance, and effectiveness separately. However, more attention should be paid to the set of strategies that are employed in public policy processes to manage populations in terms of immunization, while intertwining power with knowledge. Following Foucault's concept of governmentality and taking it further within the context of biopolitics, this chapter focuses on different knowledge practices regarding vaccine and immunization policies in Turkey. In doing so, this case study applies a post-structural analysis to examine vaccine production, vaccine know-how, and immunization policies inscribed in policy documents as a form of knowledge practice. The analysis sheds light on the reflexive transformation of the concept of biopolitics, which is moving from state-oriented knowledge practices toward a neoliberal governmentality of immunization.

Details

Biopolitics at 50 Years
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-108-2

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2022

Patrice De Micco, Maria Pia Maraghini and Tiziana Spadafina

This study provides a systematic literature review and categorization of the costs reported in the literature for the introduction of new vaccines, focusing on sub-Saharan…

Abstract

Purpose

This study provides a systematic literature review and categorization of the costs reported in the literature for the introduction of new vaccines, focusing on sub-Saharan Africa within LMICs, where vaccines are highly needed, financial resources are scarce and data are lacking and scattered.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature search of PubMed and Web of Science databases was conducted according to the PRISMA requirements. Searches also included the relevant grey literature. In total, 39 studies were selected and nine cost categories were investigated to build a comprehensive framework.

Findings

The paper considers nine cost categories that cover the whole life of the vaccine, from its initial study to its full implementation, including for each of them the relevant subcategories. The systematic review, besides providing specific quantitative data and allowing to assess their variability within each category, points out that delivery, program preparation, administration and procurement costs are the most frequently estimated categories, while the cost of the good sold, costs borne by households and costs associated to AEFI are usually overlooked. Data reported on R&D costs and investment in the production plant differ significantly among the selected contributions.

Originality/value

The literature contributions on cost estimation tend to focus on a precise vaccine, a specific geographic area, or to adopt a narrow approach that captures only a subset of the costs. This article presents a rich and inclusive set of the economic quantitative data on immunization costs in limited-resource countries.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

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