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Article
Publication date: 29 September 2021

Serena Rose Louisa Tomlinson

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “A logic model for the implementation of a regional workforce strategy in Positive Behavioural Support”.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “A logic model for the implementation of a regional workforce strategy in Positive Behavioural Support”.

Design/methodology/approach

This commentary provides a discussion of the importance of evaluating positive behaviour support (PBS) training and key issues relating to this. This provides a springboard from which researchers/practitioners may consider these issues when designing and evaluating PBS training courses.

Findings

Three main issues are explored: the necessary diversity and breadth of PBS training approaches, the outcome domains to be evaluated and wider systemic issues that may influence PBS training and evaluation of its effectiveness.

Originality/value

Effective PBS implementation requires robust training. To achieve this, it will be important for the field to overcome issues relating to the evaluation of training approaches.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

AiHua Zhu, AiHua Zhu, Chaochao Ma, Jianwei Yang, Xin Hou, Hongxiao Li and Peiwen Sun

Considering that a meet between high-speed trains can generate aerodynamic loads, this study aims to investigate the effect of high-speed train meet on wheel wear at…

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Abstract

Purpose

Considering that a meet between high-speed trains can generate aerodynamic loads, this study aims to investigate the effect of high-speed train meet on wheel wear at different speeds to provide a more accurate wheel wear model and a new idea for reducing wheel wear.

Design/methodology/approach

The train speed was set at 250, 300, 350 and 400 km/h separately, and a vehicle system dynamics model was constructed using the parameters of an actual high-speed train on a line. The aerodynamic forces arising from constant-speed train meet were then applied as additional excitation. Semi-Hertzian theory and Kalker’s simplified theory were used to solve the wheel/rail contact problems. The wheel wear was calculated using Archard wear model. The effect of train meet on wheel wear was analyzed for the whole train, different cars and different axles.

Findings

According to the results, all wheels show a wear increase in the case of one train meet, compared to the case of no train meet. At 250, 300, 350 and 400 km/h, the total wheel wear increases by 4.45%, 4.91%, 7.57% and 5.71%, respectively, over the entire operational period. The change in speed has a greater impact on wheel wear increase in the head and tail cars than in the middle car. Moreover, the average wear increase in front-axle wheels is 1.04–2.09 times that in rear-axle wheels on the same bogie.

Practical implications

The results will help to analyze wheel wear more accurately and provide theoretical guidance for wheel repair and maintenance from the perspective of high-speed train meet.

Originality/value

At present, there is a lot of focus on the impact of high-speed train meet on the dynamic performance of vehicles. However, little research is available on the influence of train meet on wheel wear. In this study, a vehicle dynamics model was constructed and the aerodynamic forces generated during high-speed train meet were applied as additional excitation. The effect of train meet on wheel wear was analyzed for the whole train, different cars and different axles. The proposed method can provide a more accurate basis for wear prediction and wheel repair.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 73 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2012

James Lloyd Bierstaker, James E. Hunton and Jay C. Thibodeau

The current study examines the effect of fraud training on auditors' ability to identify fraud risk factors. This is important because most auditors have little or no…

Abstract

The current study examines the effect of fraud training on auditors' ability to identify fraud risk factors. This is important because most auditors have little or no direct experience with fraud; thus, research that investigates the potential effect of indirect experience through training is vitally important to fraud detection and audit quality. A total of 369 experienced auditors completed a complex audit simulation task that involved 15 seeded fraud risk red flags. A total of 143 auditors participated in a 30-minute training session focused specifically on fraud risk, while the remaining 226 auditors learned about general internal control risk during this time block. The results indicate that auditors with fraud training identified significantly more red flags and obtained greater knowledge about fraud risk than auditors who did not receive the training. Considering that the fraud training consumed only 30 minutes out of a 64-hour training session, the findings suggest that even modest exposure to fraud training is quite effective.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-758-1

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Vito Getuli, Pietro Capone, Alessandro Bruttini and Tommaso Sorbi

Health and safety training via immersive virtual reality (VR) in the construction sector is still limited to few early adopters despite the benefits it could provide in…

Abstract

Purpose

Health and safety training via immersive virtual reality (VR) in the construction sector is still limited to few early adopters despite the benefits it could provide in terms of training effectiveness. To foster its adoption, in this work, the authors address the lack of an organized asset of digital contents dedicated to the production of VR site scenarios that emerged as one of the most limiting factors for the implementation of building information modeling (BIM) and VR for construction workers’ safety training. To improve this critically time-consuming process, a dedicated site object library is proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

The development of the site object library for the production of BIM-based VR safety training experiences followed a four-step process: definition of the object list and categories from the analysis of heterogeneous knowledge sources – construction sectors’ regulations, case studies and site scenarios’ imagery; definition of the object requirements (e.g. information, graphics, sounds, animations and more); design of an object information sheet as a library implementation support tool; and library implementation and validation via collaborative VR sessions.

Findings

This work provides the definition of a structured library of construction site objects dedicated to the production of VR scenarios for safety training comprising 168 items, implemented and validated.

Originality/value

The research contributes to facilitate and standardize the time-consuming contents’ production and modeling process of site scenarios for VR safety training, addressing the lack of a dedicated site object library. Furthermore, the novel library framework could serve as a base for future extensions dedicated to other applications of VR site simulations (e.g. constructability analysis).

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Gordon B. Cooke, James Chowhan, Kelly Mac Donald and Sara Mann

This paper presents a typology exploring employers’ perceptions of the quality of available applicants and employers decisions to buy qualified staff vs. to hire available…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents a typology exploring employers’ perceptions of the quality of available applicants and employers decisions to buy qualified staff vs. to hire available workers and then make i.e. develop them via employer-supported training.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses 2015 survey data from Southwestern Ontario, Canada, based on responses from 834 employers regarding their hiring, separations, training and other HRM policies.

Findings

Among surveyed employers, 10% are “Reliants” who found the quality of available applicants to be low, yet these employers do not provide employee training. Almost half of employers (at 45%) are “Developers” who find the quality of applicants to be low but they do provide employee training. Approximately, 7% of employers are “Poachers” who find that the quality of applicants is high and do not provide employee training, while 38% are Refiners, who find the quality of applicants is high and they provide employee training.

Originality/value

Employers need to make their training decisions in alignment with their assessment of the quality of job applicants to whom they have access. In this paper, decisions on training and applicant quality are considered concurrently. From an academic viewpoint, the findings raise the issue as to whether other stakeholders (such as educational institutions) are sufficiently helping individuals gain the skills, credentials and work experiences that employers are seeking. If job openings are remaining unfilled because employers are unwilling to hire those available, then applicants lose, employers lose and societies lose.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2021

David R. White, Joseph Schafer and Michael Kyle

The purpose of this study is to explore the impacts coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) had on US police academies’ production of police recruits.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the impacts coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) had on US police academies’ production of police recruits.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a national online survey of police academy directors in the USA, followed by purposive, semi-structured interviews of select academy directors. A combination of quantitative and qualitative data is combined in a mixed methods approach.

Findings

The findings suggest that academies experienced a range of impacts related to COVID-19. These impacts lead to more questions concerning how academies and state-level governing boards responded not only to pandemic-related challenges, but also to their willingness to accept more online and alternative curriculum delivery strategies.

Originality/value

Police academies are a required step in the production of new police recruits in the USA, but researchers have paid little attention to how academies operate. While exploratory, this study provides some insights into how this aspect of policing weathered the COVID-19 pandemic, and offers suggestions for future research, as well as policy implications.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Erin Richmond, Robert McColm, Marie McCaig and Vikki Binnie

In support of the national requirement “to ensure that Scotland has a workforce that is fully aware of the impact of trauma, and is equipped to respond appropriately to…

Abstract

Purpose

In support of the national requirement “to ensure that Scotland has a workforce that is fully aware of the impact of trauma, and is equipped to respond appropriately to people who have experienced trauma at any age”, Trauma Awareness Training was delivered to various public sector organisations across Dumfries and Galloway. Research has shown that trauma can significantly impact quality of life (Svanberg, Bonney and McNair, 2011; Bentall et al., 2014). A trauma-informed practice workshop was created and evaluated in response to a need for training within public services for individuals working with clients whom have experienced trauma.

Design/methodology/approach

From May 2018 to December 2019, 10 one-day Trauma-Awareness Training courses were delivered, engaging 224 public service workers from Police Scotland, Scottish Fire Service, Relationship Scotland, Shelter Scotland and DandG Council staff working with trauma-experienced individuals. The training was delivered via PowerPoint, short videos, whiteboard explanations/drawings and case examples. The morning workshop concentrated on defining psychological trauma, understanding the psychological process of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and the subsequent consequences. The afternoon session focussed primarily on complex PTSD, the role of adverse childhood experiences, attachment and emotional regulation/dysregulation and trauma-focused working with the wider multi-disciplinary workforce. The training concluded with participants developing strategies for coping with trauma. Participants were asked to complete three questionnaires: pre-training questionnaire on perceived knowledge of trauma and delivering trauma practice. Post-training questionnaire on perceived knowledge of trauma and delivering trauma practice to assess change and training evaluation. A third questionnaire was issued seven months after training to establish the impact of training on practice.

Findings

Findings evidence a positive impact on person-centred care. In terms of quality improvement, participants felt: The training was relevant across services and raised awareness of the importance of trauma-informed practice. They had a greater awareness of trauma-related issues with individuals. Confident in implementing learned skills to assist those who have experience of trauma. They could build better relationships with their service users, with patients feeling more understood.

Originality/value

Project findings identified a need for multi-organisational working and consultancy from psychological services to improve access to services. Ultimately, brief trauma-awareness training for staff can lead to more positive experiences for patients.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2021

Danielle Romain Dagenhardt, Amanda Heideman, Victoria Knoche and Tina Freiburger

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a conflict management training that used a communication competence perspective. This addresses whether the training had an impact…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a conflict management training that used a communication competence perspective. This addresses whether the training had an impact on role conflict, conflict resolution skills, horizontal violence, burnout, turnover intention and perceptions of consumers. It also assessed staff perceptions of the training.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method analysis was used using survey data from multiple time points along with focus group interviews.

Findings

The program decreased role conflict, horizontal violence and burnout among direct-care workers, whereas feelings of safety and perceptions of workers’ ability to protect themselves and others in aggressive situations increased. Furthermore, staff felt the training was useful and increased feelings of safety and empowerment at the study.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that conflict management training may need additional refresher sessions. Administrative planning is also needed to ensure training of all staff is trained in an adequate timeframe.

Originality/value

These results, although positive, are somewhat time bound. Therefore, the content of training and knowledge dissemination of conflict management training need additional research to ensure best practices.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Naouel Ben Jemaa Cherif

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of training on labor productivity and wages in order to examine how the benefits from training are shared between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of training on labor productivity and wages in order to examine how the benefits from training are shared between employers and employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzes an industry panel covering all sectors of the Tunisian economy for the period 2000–2014. The panel structure of the data allows controlling for the endogeneity of training by using different panel data techniques.

Findings

Results show that both employers and workers benefit from training since it has a positive and significant effect on productivity and wages. However, the effect of training on productivity is substantially higher than on wages, suggesting that employers obtain the largest part of the returns to training. This result is consistent with theories that explain firm-sponsored training by a compressed wage structure in imperfect labor markets.

Originality/value

This study, particularly showcasing the labor market in Tunisia, is one of the first to provide estimates for a developing country to assess the effects of training for both employer and employee. It is also among the few empirical works that analyzed the impact of training on labor productivity and wages simultaneously.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2021

Alex Aruldoss, Kellyann Berube Kowalski, Miranda Lakshmi Travis and Satyanarayana Parayitam

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between work–life balance (WLB) and job stress, job commitment and job satisfaction. Further, the role of work…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between work–life balance (WLB) and job stress, job commitment and job satisfaction. Further, the role of work environment and training and development as moderators in the relationship between WLB and its consequences is investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a structured survey instrument, this paper gathered data from 331 respondents working in a transportation company in southern part of India. After checking the psychometric properties of the structured survey instrument, the authors analyzed data using hierarchical regression and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The hierarchical regression results indicated that WLB is (1) negatively related to job stress, (2) positively related to job satisfaction and (3) positively related to job commitment. The results also indicated that (1) job stress is negatively related to job satisfaction, and (2) job commitment is positively related to job satisfaction. The results also support that work environment is a moderator in the relationship between (1) WLB and job stress, and (2) WLB and job satisfaction. Results also documented that training and development is a moderator in the relationship between (1) job stress and job satisfaction, and (2) job commitment and job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Since the present research is based on self-report measures, the limitations of common method bias and social desirability are inherent. However, the authors have taken sufficient care to minimize these limitations. The research has implications for managers in work organizations.

Practical implications

This study contributes to both literature on human resource management and practicing managers. The study suggests that employers need to be aware of the importance of WLB and invest moneys into training and development programs. Results also suggest maintaining congenial work environment to help employees maintain balance between work and life.

Social implications

The study is expected to contribute to the welfare of the society in terms of identifying the consequences of WLB.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights about the consequences of WLB through moderating role of training and development and work environment. To the authors’ knowledge, this is a conceptual model developed and tested and first of its kind in India.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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