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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2022

Satoshi Tanaka

Although individual exploration activities have been shown to promote organizational change and innovation, few studies have clarified the factors that quantitatively…

Abstract

Purpose

Although individual exploration activities have been shown to promote organizational change and innovation, few studies have clarified the factors that quantitatively promote such aspects. This study aims to examine how individual exploration activities are facilitated by goal orientation and individual unlearning.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are analyzed from 1,474 employees in various jobs in a variety of organizations in Japan. This study uses structural equation modeling to test the research model.

Findings

The results of this study indicate three findings. First, unlearning is effective in promoting individual exploration activities. Second, goal orientation has not only a direct effect on individual exploration activities but also a significant indirect effect on such activities through unlearning. Third, performance goal orientation has an inhibitory effect on individual exploration activities.

Practical implications

Managers should encourage team members’ exploration activities by setting learning goals for members and providing opportunities for members to unlearn the outdated knowledge or skills they are familiar with and learn new ones.

Originality/value

These findings contribute to the existing literature by demonstrating that learning goal orientation and unlearning play important roles in promoting individual exploration activities.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2022

Sergio Santoro

This study aims to innovate by investigating the effects of goal orientations on informal learning strategies and whether intrinsic motivation mediates the relation…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to innovate by investigating the effects of goal orientations on informal learning strategies and whether intrinsic motivation mediates the relation between those two constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

To address these aims, the author relied on a quantitative study and on structural equation modeling to evaluate the relationships prescribed by the research model. The hypotheses were tested on a sample of 244 bank managers from Brazilian banks.

Findings

Results show that mastery goal orientation positively relate with both informal cognitive and behavioral learning strategies in the workplace.

Originality/value

This paper has contributed to the discussion concerning the effects of goal orientations on managers’ informal learning strategies, complementing previous research on the antecedents of informal learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Emil Lucian Crisan

This study aims to address a paucity of research into career success by exploring the impact of organizational context (“in-group” culture and the competitiveness…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address a paucity of research into career success by exploring the impact of organizational context (“in-group” culture and the competitiveness strategy) and individual variables (self-efficacy and goal orientation), on objective career success (academic position) and subjective career success (career satisfaction).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were obtained from 447 faculty members employed by Babeș-Bolyai University (BBU), the best-ranked Romanian higher education institution. For analysis, hierarchical multiple regressions analyzes were used.

Findings

The novel results of this quantitative analysis are that organizational context variables influence both subjective career success and objective career success. Academics who do not attain promotion have lower subjective career success and objective career success, as a result of the publish or perish university strategy. Self-efficacy has a positive impact on both success types, while goal orientation is for subjective career success a weak predictor.

Practical implications

Organizational efforts should be focused on improving academics career development especially for those teachers who are in the current position already for many years. The development of performance-driven career paths should be also considered for diminishing the impact of organizational variables.

Originality/value

This paper extends the knowledge concerning objective and subjective career success by revealing the important impact of contextual determinants, as it confirms the impact of individual self-efficacy in a university context and partially the one of goal orientation.

Details

Rajagiri Management Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-9968

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Annie Chen, Norman Peng and Kuang-peng Hung

The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance of salespeople when selling new products (namely, electronic goods) in a business-to-business context by…

1460

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance of salespeople when selling new products (namely, electronic goods) in a business-to-business context by incorporating the organizations’ perceived psychological climate into goal orientation theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study uses the goal orientation theory to examine the performance of 158 salespeople based on new electronic product sales. Organizational psychological climate perceptions (i.e. customer orientation, sales supportiveness and sales innovativeness) are included as variables that can moderate salespeople’s performance. This study used partial least squares to examine its proposed model.

Findings

This study found that the learning goal orientation and the performance-prove goal orientation positively affect salespeople’s self-efficacy to sell new products, whereas a performance-avoid goal orientation negatively affects efficacy. In addition, new product selling self-efficacy itself has a positive influence on new product sales performance. As for the moderator, sales supportiveness and customer orientation have the ability to moderate the relationship between self-efficacy and performance.

Practical implications

This study has implications for sales managers or product managers who are responsible for promoting new products. First, this study’s findings suggest that managers should consider employing performance-prove goal-oriented staff and learning goal oriented staff to sell new products. Second, management can attempt to develop a more supportive climate for the sales team, such as assisting the team in obtaining needed resources from other departments. Finally, management needs to let salespeople know that they are doing their best to understand what new products existing and potential customers will need in the near future.

Originality/value

This current research is one of the first to examine how the perceived psychological climates of organizations (i.e. sales supportiveness, sales innovativeness and customer orientation) may moderate salespeople’s performance when selling new products. Second, this research examines how different types of goal orientation affect salespeople’s self-efficacy when selling new products. Previous results have not always been consistent regarding the influence of a performance-prove goal orientation. Last but not least, this study tests how new product selling self-efficacy mediates the relationships between goal orientations and new product sales performance as scholars have suggested that more research into the mediating role of self-efficacy is needed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Charles M. Carson, Don C. Mosley and Scott L. Boyar

This paper explores the role of individual goal orientation on the self‐management work process and how individual goal orientation may impact self‐managed work team…

3836

Abstract

This paper explores the role of individual goal orientation on the self‐management work process and how individual goal orientation may impact self‐managed work team (SMWT) effectiveness. Supervisory encouragement, team member goal orientation, and work team behaviors are included in a conceptual model of work team effectiveness. Propositions addressing the relationships between goal orientation, encouraging supervisory behaviors, and self‐managed work team effectiveness are offered and practical implications addressing the usage of goal orientation as a selection tool for self‐managed work teams and the need for external supervisors to encourage certain work team behaviors to promote work team effectiveness are discussed.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Shu‐chi Lin and Jung‐nung Chang

To provide a further examination into the explanatory factors of employees' mobility for organizations wishing to improve performance by keeping right employees judging…

5474

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a further examination into the explanatory factors of employees' mobility for organizations wishing to improve performance by keeping right employees judging from their goal orientation and organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

The multivariate statistical methods (MANOVA) together with a longitudinal design are used to test the hypotheses generated from the theory with data gathered from two Taiwan‐based financial institutions.

Findings

Suggests that those who quit for what they perceive as upwardly mobile career moves and those who enjoy in‐house promotions both demonstrate a greater degree of positive learning goal orientation than their colleagues who remain stationary in long‐term positions with the same firm. Makes note of the inability of performance goal orientation and organizational commitment to explain employee mobility behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizability is limited due to the concentration of this longitudinal‐design study on two institutions of a single industry in Taiwan.

Practical implications

Provides a positive advice for organizations to create mechanisms and environment that can engage learning‐oriented employees as meaningful contributors in principal challenges and to use learning experiences to revitalize them and deepen their commitment.

Originality/value

This paper clarifies the influence of goal orientation and organizational commitment upon employees' mobility and identifies their relationship with findings suggesting a direct link between positive learning goal orientation and positive job performance.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Marcello Russo

The purpose of this paper is to test a model in which diversity in goal orientation is associated with decreased team performance by virtue of reduced group information…

5557

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test a model in which diversity in goal orientation is associated with decreased team performance by virtue of reduced group information elaboration. In addition, the model considers the moderating role of internal team environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of an empirical research in which the hypothesized relationships are investigated using hierarchical multiple‐regression analyses.

Findings

The findings show that teams high in diversity in goal orientation report lower levels of performance because of the lower group information elaboration. However, in the presence of a supportive team environment the negative relationship of diversity in goal orientation on group information elaboration are reduced.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on a cross‐sectional design.

Practical implications

The paper suggests management should consider goal orientation in team building, and provide interventions to improve team environment.

Social implications

Diversity has relevant consequences on interpersonal relations, decision‐making processes, and team performance. The results of the present study suggest ways in which teams might leverage the benefits of diversity and reduce coordination problems associated with it.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the diversity team literature by expanding Nederveen‐Pieterse and colleagues' research on diversity in goal orientation by emphasizing the role of internal team environment as moderator in the relationship between diversity in goal orientation and group information elaboration.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Jia‐Chi Huang

This study seeks to explore team goal orientation as a team characteristic that affects team members' self‐regulation, and conflict management approach as a…

14029

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to explore team goal orientation as a team characteristic that affects team members' self‐regulation, and conflict management approach as a self‐regulation tactic. Its purpose is to investigate the moderating effect of team goal orientation and conflict management approach on the linkage between task conflict and relationship conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were received from 529 team members in 120 R&D teams in Taiwan. The hypothesis is tested using hierarchical regressions.

Findings

The results indicate that team goal orientation and a conflict management approach moderated the relationship between task conflict and relationship conflict. The positive relationship between task conflict and relationship conflict was weaker under conditions of higher team learning orientation and lower team performance orientation. The positive association between task conflict and relationship conflict was also weaker among teams that engaged in cooperative conflict management and did not engage in the avoiding conflict management approach.

Research limitations/implications

The study is cross‐sectional in design, limiting the ability to make causal assertions about links between task conflict and relationship conflict.

Practical implications

To prevent detrimental relationship conflict triggered by task conflict, supervisors may need to use goal orientation disposition as a criterion in selecting team members. Supervisors also could frame the tasks and discussions of team members towards learning rather than performance goals, enabling team members to openly share divergent opinions and take advantage of task conflict.

Originality/value

The study facilitates understanding of how to unbundle the linkage between task conflict and relationship conflict in teams, along with making contributions to conflict theory.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Yi-chun Lin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between protean career attitude and perceived internal and external employability, along with the mediating…

2938

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between protean career attitude and perceived internal and external employability, along with the mediating effect of learning-goal orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by distributing paper-based questionnaires to 527 workers in private banking sectors in Taiwan. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to examine the results of the relationships.

Findings

The results supported the idea that protean career attitude is a significant antecedent of perceived internal and external employability. Protean talents with a higher degree of protean attitude toward value-driven career orientation and self-directed career management have an external employability that is greater than their internal employability. Learning-goal orientation fully mediated the effect of protean career attitude on perceived internal employability, but only partially mediated external employability.

Practical implications

The findings can help human resource managers gain a better understanding of the use of an appropriate strategy to influence an employee’s perceived internal and external employability, which can increase the motivation and improve employer-employee relationships that contribute to organizational success and performance. Employees should recognize the increased importance of continuous learning with goal-setting in order to deal with changes at work.

Originality/value

This paper empirically establishes the association between protean career attitude and perceived internal and external employability. The protean career concept may provide organizations with a valuable perspective in the evolution of careers. Valuable and protean talents place an emphasis on individuals’ core values, and while learning goals are meant to suit employer organizations, they may also establish opportunities that could cross-organizational boundaries.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

Michele Swift, David B. Balkin and Sharon F. Matusik

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model that takes into account both personal and contextual factors in explaining individuals' motivation to share their knowledge.

5520

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model that takes into account both personal and contextual factors in explaining individuals' motivation to share their knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from research on achievement motivation and social exchange, it is posited that goal orientations provide a framework for individuals' knowledge sharing by shaping how they cognitively value the costs and benefits associated with sharing their knowledge. It is argued each of the goal orientations is associated with preferences for sharing specific types of knowledge and is that a focus on different aspects of the knowledge provider‐recipient relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The model provides a possible explanation for some of the inconsistencies in existing knowledge‐sharing research on the factors that motivate knowledge sharing as well as expanding understanding of the conditions that facilitate knowledge sharing.

Practical implications

For organizations to encourage the desired knowledge sharing, they may need to maintain human resource management (HRM) practices that recognize the different motivations associated with each of the goal orientations.

Originality/value

The model developed integrates research on goal orientations and knowledge transfer to expand understanding of how individuals cognitively value the costs and benefits of sharing their knowledge.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 59000