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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Hung‐Wen Lee

The purpose of this research is to investigate factors that influence employees' organizational identification. Focusing on the banking industry in Taiwan, this study aims…

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4403

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate factors that influence employees' organizational identification. Focusing on the banking industry in Taiwan, this study aims to examine how locus of control and organizational socialization affect employees' organizational identification.

Design/methodology/approach

The author borrows and modifies scales from the literature on locus of control, organizational socialization, and organizational identification to create a questionnaire that was translated into Chinese and distributed to bankers in Taiwan. The author analyzes reliability of the scales and performs regression analysis on hypothesized model relationships.

Findings

Significant positive relationships are found between locus of control and organizational socialization, locus of control and organizational identification, and organizational socialization and organizational identification. Organizational socialization has mediating influences on locus of control and organizational identification.

Research limitations/implications

This research is a starting point in developing theory related to the relationships among locus of control, organizational socialization, and organizational identification. The research is based on data from Taiwan banking employees only and the sample was small (even though results were significant).

Originality/value

The research empirically demonstrates that locus of control influences organizational socialization and identification.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 51 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Robert J. Taormina

The purpose of this paper is to look into the theories regarding leadership, organizational culture, and organizational socialization and the theory that some aspects of…

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16868

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look into the theories regarding leadership, organizational culture, and organizational socialization and the theory that some aspects of socialization (e.g. employee enthusiasm for, or lack of, cooperation) can influence an organization's culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Via questionnaire, 166 employees from a variety of organizations evaluated their leaders and companies on all variables. Correlation and regression analyses were employed.

Findings

Correlations revealed leader behaviors to be more control‐oriented in bureaucratic culture; and more flexible‐oriented in innovative culture; but, contrary to expectations, more control‐oriented in supportive culture. Regressions confirmed these results and revealed that both leadership and socialization explained significant variance in all cultures. The leadership behaviors were also differentially associated with the socialization content domains, supporting most but refuting some aspects of organization theory.

Research limitations/implications

The unexpected finding of highly control‐oriented leader behaviors in supportive culture suggests the need for more research in this area.

Practical implications

A need for more flexible leader behaviors in certain organizational cultures was found. Leadership behaviors needing development in regard to socialization were likewise revealed. Also found, were aspects of socialization content that need more management attention in all three types of organizational cultures examined.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical analysis of the interrelationships among the organizational socialization content areas, leadership behavior, and organizational culture.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Elena P. Antonacopoulou and Wolfgang H. Güttel

Socialization is one of the fundamental processes that define how collectivities emerge. Socialization underpins the social structures that shape not only how social…

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8461

Abstract

Purpose

Socialization is one of the fundamental processes that define how collectivities emerge. Socialization underpins the social structures that shape not only how social actors interact in community but also the boundaries of action and the rules of engagement. In the context of organizations, socialization is a process that significantly shapes organization in the way core practices shape how things are done and why they are done in particular ways. This emphasis on consistency within and between practices is seen to be greatly facilitated by specific practices like staff induction. The purpose of this paper is to review the current conceptual and empirical research on staff induction as a process of organizational socialization and outlines some of the areas for future research particularly if a social practice perspective is adopted.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a systematic review of the relevant literature on organizational socialization and staff induction and outlines themes to which the debate can usefully be extended.

Findings

This paper focuses on how staff induction practices provide valuable insights about how social agents (especially newcomers) get socialized in organizations.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides a foundation for the various staff induction practices that other papers in this issue will be presenting. By outlining the current debate and insights from previous empirical research on staff induction, the objective is to extend the debate by outlining some new avenues for research that papers in the special issue both respond to and further explicate.

Originality/value

This paper explores staff induction and organizational socialization as a practice that can provide new insights into the dynamics of social interaction within organizations.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Ruth C. King, Weidong Xia, James Campbell Quick and Vikram Sethi

This study examined how six institutionalized socialization tactics affect a particular occupation of knowledge workers – information technology (IT) professionals' role…

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4029

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined how six institutionalized socialization tactics affect a particular occupation of knowledge workers – information technology (IT) professionals' role adjustment (role conflict and role ambiguity) and organizational attachment variables (job satisfaction, affective commitment, continuance commitment and intention to quit).

Design/methodology/approach

The research model and hypotheses were tested using path analysis techniques with survey data collected from 187 recently hired IT professionals.

Findings

The results showed that the six socialization tactics affected IT professionals differently. Socialization tactics that recognize employees' values and skills (investiture tactics) and that emphasize the interpersonal and mentoring aspects (serial tactics) had the most significant effects on employees' role adjustment and organizational attachment. The study also revealed complex mediating relationships among socialization tactics, role adjustment and organizational attachment variables.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights about the differential effects of the various socialization tactics on IT professionals' role adjustment and organizational attachment. It also sheds light on the complex mediating relationships among socialization tactics, role adjustment and organizational attachment variables. Without considering the logical relationships between the various variables, studies examining the direct effects of socialization on isolated organizational outcome variables may overlook important linkages that are critical for explaining the inconsistent results in past empirical studies.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2009

Tará Lopez and Amy McMillan‐Capehart

The purpose of this paper is to present an argument for the importance of organizational culture and organizational socialization as controls for business‐to‐business salespeople.

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2123

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an argument for the importance of organizational culture and organizational socialization as controls for business‐to‐business salespeople.

Design/methodology/approach

Organization theory suggests that social forms of control can be an effective influence on salesperson activities and behaviors. Based on organization theory, the paper presents a typology of social control combinations and offers propositions to guide future research.

Findings

It is suggested that different combinations of organizational culture and socialization moderate the relationship between person‐organization fit and relevant outcomes such that, under various social control environments, creativity is greater, salesperson performance is higher, and salespeople are less likely to leave the firm and will experience greater job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The primary limitation is that it is conceptual in nature. Despite this, arguments presented herein support that socialization activities set the stage for salespeople's attitudes, behaviors, and performance, while organizational culture can reinforce or undermine the firm's socialization efforts. This provides the necessary foundation for future empirical research applying organizational theory to salesperson control.

Practical implications

Salespeople remain the driving force for revenue generation for many business‐to‐business firms. Sales managers are challenged with the task of directing salespeople to meet organizational objectives. However, based on organizational theory, traditional control methods may be less effective because of the unique characteristics of the business‐to‐business sales position. The research suggests that the organizational culture and the socialization tactics used by the sales manager can be tools that sales managers can use to control and direct the activities of salespeople.

Originality/value

Previous research has focused predominantly on outcome‐ and behavior‐based controls for business‐to‐business salespeople and has largely overlooked the potential influence of social controls such as organizational culture and organizational socialization. This research fills that gap.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Sarah B. Lueke and Daniel J. Svyantek

The socialization process of expatriates into their host country organizational culture has been largely ignored in the expatriate literature. This paper reviews the…

Abstract

The socialization process of expatriates into their host country organizational culture has been largely ignored in the expatriate literature. This paper reviews the expatriate literature for the best employee and organizational results. For the most part, socialization tactics of the organization and information seeking of the individual have been overlooked as factors in the success of expatriates. We propose that combining knowledge gained through research in these two areas is essential in gaining a theoretical understanding of expatriate turnover. The Attraction‐Selection‐Attrition (ASA) model of how organizational culture is transmitted across organizational members is discussed. This model is used to demonstrate how the socialization of expatriates can benefit both the organization and the individual.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2019

Gregory A. Cranmer, Zachary W. Goldman and Jeffery D. Houghton

The purpose of this paper is to explore newcomers as active participants within their own socialization, through the influence of self-leadership on proactivity and…

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1038

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore newcomers as active participants within their own socialization, through the influence of self-leadership on proactivity and subsequently organizational socialization and organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 193 organizational newcomers (i.e. individuals within their first year at an organization) working in a variety of industries were examined within three serial mediation models in PROCESS.

Findings

The results of these analyses suggest that self-leadership influences organizational newcomers’ adjustment and subsequent commitment by assisting them in seeking organizational resources.

Research limitations/implications

This study answers calls to explore both the mediating mechanisms through which self-leadership processes influence organizational outcomes and the complex relationships between human workplace interactions and the proximal and distal outcomes of socialization.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that organizational stakeholders should enhance the self-leadership abilities of newcomer, thereby easing the socialization burden on organizations.

Originality/value

This paper offers a novel framework (i.e. self-leadership) for understanding newcomer socialization and provides an encompassing model that recognizes individual capacities, communicative behaviors, adjustment and subsequent organizational attitudes.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Cathrine Filstad

This study examines how newcomers use colleagues as role models in organizational socialization, taking a multiple level approach to organizational socialization as…

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5266

Abstract

This study examines how newcomers use colleagues as role models in organizational socialization, taking a multiple level approach to organizational socialization as individual, social and cultural learning processes. The newcomers' most important personal characteristics are expectations, experience, self‐confidence and competitive instinct. These personal characteristics were affected by early experience during the first four to six weeks in their new job. The study shows not only the correlation between early experience and personal characteristics, but also reveals a strong correlation between early experience and organizational socialization outcome. Newcomers rely on role models, and as a result of interaction and observation they acquire different qualifications from several role models. The term “multiple contingent role models” is introduced to explain how newcomers use role models.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2019

David A.L. Coldwell, Mervywn Williamson and Danielle Talbot

A significant and increasing number of graduate recruits take up employment for specific companies by virtue of their ethical reputation and profiles. As such, ethical fit…

Abstract

Purpose

A significant and increasing number of graduate recruits take up employment for specific companies by virtue of their ethical reputation and profiles. As such, ethical fit has become an important dimension of the attraction and retention of graduates. However, preconceived notions of a company’s ethical orientation obtained through the media and initial recruitment exercises may be challenged during the induction and socialization phases of organizational entry, such that people may find that the reputation is just an external façade leading to disappointment and a reassessment of the employer. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The study’s essential focus is on building a conceptual ethical fit model and to underline the need for further conceptual development in the area. The analysis of extant secondary data and the methodology of serendipity were used.

Findings

The model’s conceptual cogency and practical utility for human resource management are analyzed in the light of specific secondary data and specific propositions described.

Research limitations/implications

A major concern with conceptual models is empirical validity and practical utility which requires empirical testing. However, this limitation has been mitigated by the use of a serendipitous approach from a qualitative empirical study with a generalized person–organization (P–O) focus.

Practical implications

Various practical implications of the model described in the paper for HR management are evident from empirical studies in the area which have dealt with particular aspects of the model. For example, Bauer et al. (1998) found that socialization effects employee turnover. And, Cable and Parsons (2001) indicate that organizational socialization is critical in generating committed employees whose values are congruent with those of the organization. Since committed employees are critical for the success of the organization, they suggest training programs for hiring managers and criteria in performance appraisals that include the development of employee value congruence through specific formal socialization tactics.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the extant literature by building a dynamic conceptual model with attendant testable propositions that explore the implications of employee misalignment in pre-socialization anticipatory organizational ethical fit and post-socialization organizational ethical fit. More specifically, the study contributes to the extant literature by considering the socialization process in relation to ethical fit dynamics. It also considers from the point of view of specific moral development theory and changing perceptions of ethical climate that occur during organizational socialization. Serendipitous material obtained from a qualitative study of P–O fit puts flesh on the bones of the effects of the socialization process on ethical fit described by the paper’s conceptual model while providing circumstantial evidence for the propositions and their practical utility for HR management.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2010

Jianhua Ge, Xuemei Su and Yan Zhou

This paper aims to: provide theoretical analysis and empirical study on the relationship between organizational socialization and organizational citizenship behavior…

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2354

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to: provide theoretical analysis and empirical study on the relationship between organizational socialization and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB); analyze the mediating role of organizational identification in their relationship; and draw from both of these to suggest practical implications to organizations aiming to effectively socialize employees, and for employees themselves.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the paper reviews the literature regarding organizational socialization, OCB and organizational identification. Second, it develops a theoretical model linking organizational socialization, organizational identification and OCB, and then proposes a series of research hypotheses. Third, drawing on samples of seven high‐tech manufacturing enterprises in China, it tests hypotheses based on a series of measurement and statistical analysis.

Findings

Organizational history, language, values and goals socialization are positively related to OCB and organizational identification. Further, organizational identification fully mediates the relationship between language, values and goals socialization and OCB, and partially mediates the relationship between history socialization and OCB.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design prevented the making of causal statements. Data are from employees' self‐report, giving rise to concern about possible common source bias.

Originality/value

The paper explores the relationships between organizational socialization and OCB, and proposes and tests the mediating role of organizational identification.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

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