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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Xiaozhong Tang and Naiming Xie

The purpose of this paper is to construct a grey clustering evaluation model based on center-point mixed possibility function and to evaluate the tourism development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to construct a grey clustering evaluation model based on center-point mixed possibility function and to evaluate the tourism development potential of tea intangible cultural heritage. The research results provide a certain reference for the tourism development department and related researchers who are engaged in the tourism development of intangible cultural heritage.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses literature research, questionnaire investigation, expert interviews and factor analysis to determine the evaluation index system of tourism development potential of tea intangible cultural heritage and applies analytic hierarchy process (AHP) to determine the weight of each criteria. Then, according to the grey clustering evaluation theory and two-stage decision model, a grey clustering evaluation model is constructed to assess the tourism development potential of tea intangible cultural heritage. Finally, a new model is employed to evaluate the tourism development potential of tea intangible cultural heritage in Huangshan city.

Findings

The results show that there is a big difference in the tourism development potential of different tea intangible cultural heritages in Huangshan City and it further illustrates the scientificity and rationality of the method proposed in this paper.

Practical implications

The model constructed in the paper can be effectively applied to the evaluation of tourism development potential of tea intangible cultural heritage scientifically and reasonably.

Originality/value

This manuscript not only constructs the evaluation index system of tourism development potential of tea intangible cultural heritage but also creatively applies the grey clustering theory to the evaluation of tourism development potential of tea intangible cultural heritage, which provides a new research idea for the evaluation of tourism development potential of tea intangible cultural heritage.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Minoo H. Esfehani

Cultural heritage carries two sets of tangible and intangible assets. The relationship between tourism and intangible cultural heritage is a young but growing discourse…

Abstract

Cultural heritage carries two sets of tangible and intangible assets. The relationship between tourism and intangible cultural heritage is a young but growing discourse. However, tourism planning and strategy development for intangible cultural heritage have so far remained undervalued. This gap looks much bigger within the Persian context. The aim of this chapter is to explore how the roles of Persian intangible cultural heritage in tourism are perceived, and whether the intended roles can be promoted as practicable tourism strategies. Data analysis suggests intangible cultural heritage as a tool that contributes positively to developing tourism strategies through promoting destination attraction and marketing opportunities and sustainability in tourism.

Details

Experiencing Persian Heritage
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-813-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Nicole Mitsche, Franziska Vogt, Dan Knox, I. Cooper, Patrizia Lombardi and Daniela Ciaffi

The purpose of this paper is to utilise commodification for the conservation and promotion of cultural heritage in cities by developing interpretative strategies…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to utilise commodification for the conservation and promotion of cultural heritage in cities by developing interpretative strategies, specifically enabling access to intangible cultural heritage through its tangible parts.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, three case studies were conducted in the cities of Amsterdam, Genoa and Leipzig, through a workshop cycle with destination and local tourism stakeholders and citizen representatives, to develop interpretative strategies for the cities.

Findings

The paper identifies tangible and intangible cultural heritage of the three cities, and integrates them into stories and outlines the development of an interpretative strategy for destinations independent from, but aligned with, the current marketing and positioning strategy development level.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine the integration process of interpretative strategies and heritage interpretation of cultural heritage in marketing strategies, and in particular focus on the intangible aspects.

Originality/value

The article integrates and highlights the value of intangible cultural heritage and interpretation of cultural heritage in general for marketing purposes through the development of an interpretative strategy improving access to destinations' cultural heritage supporting destination management. The article adds to the research discussion of the commodification of cultural heritage.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

E. Wanda George

This paper seeks to highlight issues surrounding ownership and copyrights relating to intangible cultural heritage and to raise potential concerns for local (rural…

6249

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to highlight issues surrounding ownership and copyrights relating to intangible cultural heritage and to raise potential concerns for local (rural, remote, smaller) communities involved in cultural heritage tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

The objective of the paper is to provoke reflection and further discourse on how local culture in smaller rural communities has been appropriated for tourism and related issues and concerns. Selected literature, other relevant documents and data from personal observations, derived from previous research, were examined to provide insights on the subject and to help achieve this objective.

Findings

Findings suggest that an inequity gap exists in benefits distributed to many rural communities whose cultural heritages are being appropriated and exploited by multiple commercial entities for tourism purposes and personal gain. Little, if any, of the profits realized benefit the local community – the actual creators and owners of the local culture.

Practical implications

With a new awareness and understanding of this phenomenon, developing and implementing a new and alternative approach is possible – an alternative approach that may help narrow this inequity gap while also ensuring significant sustainable benefits to all the stakeholders.

Originality/value

This paper presents new perspectives about the value of intangible cultural heritage when used for tourism. This paper should be of interest and importance to community tourism planners and policy makers, industry operators/suppliers dependent on local cultural tourism products, and consumers of local intangible culture who seek unique cultural experiences.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2020

David Heesom, Paul Boden, Anthony Hatfield, Sagal Rooble, Katie Andrews and Hadar Berwari

The purpose of this paper is to report on the development of a collaborative Heritage Building Information Modelling (HBIM) of a 19th-century multi-building industrial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the development of a collaborative Heritage Building Information Modelling (HBIM) of a 19th-century multi-building industrial site in the UK. The buildings were Grade II listed by Historic England for architectural and structural features. The buildings were also a key element of the industrial heritage and folklore of the surrounding area. As the site was due to undergo major renovation work, this project was initiated to develop a HBIM of the site that encapsulated both tangible and intangible heritage data.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of the research in this study combined multiple research methods. Building on an analysis of secondary data surrounding HBIM, a community of practice was established to shape the development of an HBIM execution plan (HBEP) and underpin the collaborative BIM development. The tangible HBIM geometry was predominantly developed using a scan to BIM methodology, whereas intangible heritage data were undertaken using unstructured interviews and a focus group used to inform the presentation approach of the HBIM data.

Findings

The project produced a collaboratively generated multi-building HBIM. The study identified the need for a dedicated HBEP that varies from prevailing BIM execution plans on construction projects. Tangible geometry of the buildings was modelled to LOD3 of the Historic England guidelines. Notably, the work identified the fluid nature of intangible data and the need to include this in an HBIM to fully support design, construction and operation of the building after renovation. A methodology was implemented to categorise intangible heritage data within a BIM context and an approach to interrogate these data from within existing BIM software tools.

Originality/Value

The paper has presented an approach to the development of HBIM for large sites containing multiple buildings/assets. The framework implemented for an HBEP can be reproduced by future researchers and practitioners wishing to undertake similar projects. The method for identifying and categorising intangible heritage information through the developed level of intangible cultural heritage was presented as new knowledge. The development of HBIM to bring together tangible and intangible data has the potential to provide a model for future work in the field and augment existing BIM data sets used during the asset lifecycle.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Celeste Jiménez de Madariaga

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how safeguarding intangible cultural heritage contributes to environmental conservation and favours sustainable development of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how safeguarding intangible cultural heritage contributes to environmental conservation and favours sustainable development of natural landscapes. To do so, the authors will focus on a study of dry stone constructions, which have been recognised by United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Design/methodology/approach

The research has been carried out through three methodologies: the search and review of archives (historical and administrative documents), ethnographic methodology (field work and interviews) and case studies.

Findings

The abandonment of dry stone constructions is placing rural zones at risk, as they assume a strategic role in environmental conservation efforts. This article seeks to highlight the importance of safeguarding this cultural heritage.

Research limitations/implications

The art of dry stone walling has its origins in ancient times and can be found in numerous regions around the world. The main ideas of this paper may be applied to many of the places where this vernacular architecture can be found.

Practical implications

Some stakeholders may apply the results of this study to identify new uses for heritage resources that allow maintenance of ecosystems while at the same time safeguarding intangible cultural heritage.

Social implications

This paper stresses the importance of raising public awareness of cultural heritage and vernacular architecture, its link with traditional activities such as farming and livestock raising, the rural landscape and reinforcement of cultural identity and historical memory.

Originality/value

This study illustrates the actions taken by UNESCO to safeguard intangible cultural heritage and the effects of those actions. It also considers dry stone constructions from the perspective of environmental sustainability, an area that has been subject to limited study.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Tomas Lopez-Guzman and Francisco Gonzalez Santa-Cruz

The development of heritage tourism has experienced a great development in recent years, mostly centred in the cities that are World Heritage. This paper aims to present…

1835

Abstract

Purpose

The development of heritage tourism has experienced a great development in recent years, mostly centred in the cities that are World Heritage. This paper aims to present an analysis of the relationship between Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) declared by UNESCO and tourism development associated therewith.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used in this research consisted of a fieldwork to determine the socio-demographic profile and perceptions of foreign tourists participating in this intangible cultural event. Additionally, the features of this tourist destination are also analysed.

Findings

The main results of this research shows the high cultural level of tourist respondents, the significant economic level of travellers and the perceptions of heritage tourists in participation in the Festival.

Research limitations/implications

The expansion of this line of research is to include other ICH; this should contribute to the generalisation of the knowledge acquired in this subject.

Practical implications

The main practical implications are centred on better understanding of the key factors involved in the relation between intangible cultural heritage and tourism.

Social implications

This study highlights the features that a heritage tourist destination must have to create a sustainable tourism destination with a combination of culture and tourism.

Originality/value

Heritage, generally tangible cultural heritage, is used as a resource in the destinations. This paper analyses the relationship between intangible cultural heritage and tourism, an aspect little studied by the scientific literature.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 September 2019

Ayman Ahmed Ezzat Othman and Mohamed Hesham Khalil

This paper aims to investigate the role of lean talent management (LTM) as a novel approach for optimising creativity in architectural design firms (ADFs) towards…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the role of lean talent management (LTM) as a novel approach for optimising creativity in architectural design firms (ADFs) towards achieving divergent heritage sustainability (DHS).

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the abovementioned aim, a mixed qualitative and quantitative methodology is designed to accomplish three objectives. First, investigating the relationship between heritage and urban development; types of heritage and the role of LTM in enhancing creativity in ADFs. Second, presenting and analysing six heritage-related case studies to assess the need for creative solutions based on extent of deterioration in three different places in Egypt. Third, outlining the results of a survey questionnaire conducted with a representative sample of ADFs in Egypt to investigate the role of LTM towards optimising creativity in ADFs for achieving DHS.

Findings

The extent of deterioration increased for modern heritage than old heritage. Conventional approaches adopted by ADFs failed to develop built environments that can bridge the gap between the diverse identities. Creativity was not optimised when talent management (TM) was integrated solely and architects failed to develop appropriate solutions. LTM use architects to allow expression of arts towards heritage sustainability through the built environment, in which they feel associated with physical heritage. Consequently, individuals’ intangible heritage is preserved in which they will less deteriorate the physical heritage. Hence, LTM is a paradigm shift that has a great potential for DHS.

Research limitations/implications

The survey questionnaire and case studies focused on the Egyptian context because the region is in critical need for effective creative solutions and for such research that is unprecedented in investigating this gap. However, findings are absolute and could be used at any country sharing the Egyptian context and wishing to achieve a DHS approach.

Originality/value

The research work presented in this paper is novel in approach as it integrates two divergent fields and highlights the concept of DHS with its threefold approach. In addition, the concept of LTM is proposed as a novel paradigm shift in which it has received scant attention especially relating to heritage sustainability. The proposed ideas represent a synthesis that is novel and creative in thought and adds to the existing body of knowledge for future research in LTM and DHS.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Marios Sotiriadis

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to suggest a conceptual framework for linking intangible cultural heritage (ICH) to tourism for managerial actions at destination…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to suggest a conceptual framework for linking intangible cultural heritage (ICH) to tourism for managerial actions at destination level; and to empirically investigate and validate the value of this framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes a conceptual framework for pairing ICH with tourism. The utility of this framework was empirically investigated by means of case study (Cretan Diet Festival, Greece) using the technique of interview.

Findings

Findings suggest that: the proposed framework constitutes a good as a planning tool useful in achieving an integrated approach and as a management tool in assessing the effectiveness of ICH projects; the crucial success factors in this area; and culinary-based festival could be a constructive platform on certain conditions.

Research limitations/implications

Because of its exploratory nature, the study has inherent drawbacks. The suggested framework should be finalised. Future studies could explore the perspective of visitors. More empirical studies are needed to provide further corroboration of the findings.

Practical implications

Practical implications of this is in the field of strategic management. It contributes to consider approach and adopt managerial action plans in the field of developing and implementing a mutually beneficial partnership between ICH and tourism.

Originality/value

It is the first study that suggests and empirically investigates a framework for linking ICH to tourism at destination level, taking a strategic management perspective. It provides an integrated approach incorporating the main issues.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Kerry Bodle, Mark Brimble, Scott Weaven, Lorelle Frazer and Levon Blue

The purpose of this paper is to investigate success factors pertinent to the management of Indigenous businesses through the identification of points of intervention at…

1673

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate success factors pertinent to the management of Indigenous businesses through the identification of points of intervention at the systemic and structural levels. Through this approach, the economic and social values that First Nations communities attach to intangible Indigenous cultural heritage (ICH) and Indigenous cultural intellectual property (ICIP) may be both recognised and realised as assets.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a multidisciplinary approach to address a global issue of economic and social significance to First Nation peoples, their businesses and the Australian Aboriginal communities. The authors adopt a First Nation epistemological standpoint that incorporates theoretical perspectives drawn from a diverse range of fields and theories (Preston, 2013), as well as advocate the use of Indigenist methodology for research with First Nation peoples as it is underpinned by critical race theory.

Findings

The authors argue conceptually that accounting, accountability and auditing consideration are required to fully identify what is impacting the successful management of Indigenous enterprises. Specifically, in relation to accounting, Elders should be included to assist in valuing the intangible ICH and ICIP assets. Furthermore, the authors emphasise the need to improve the financial and commercial literacy levels of Indigenous entrepreneurs.

Practical implications

The authors prescribe the use of tools for the accounting treatment of ICH and ICIP as intangible assets within an Australian regulatory environment and define an auditing process and accountability model incorporating cultural, social and environmental measures. A central tenet of this model relates to improving levels of personal and commercial financial literacy in the First Nation participants. Collectively, these factors promote informed participation and decision-making, and may promulgate more sustainable outcomes.

Social implications

Integrated thinking requires all these factors to be considered in a holistic manner, such that a First Nation enterprise and the wider Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can understand, and make decisions based on, the overall impact it has on all their stakeholders and generally on the society, the environment and the economy.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to Australia’s strategic research priorities of maximising social and economic participation in society and improving the health and well-being of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The authors address the inability of current Western accounting standards, practices and models to suitably account for communally held and protocol-bound intangible Indigenous cultural heritage and Indigenous cultural intellectual property assets.

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