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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Swati Alok, Sudatta Banerjee and Swati Singh

This study aims to examine the relationship between work-family conflict (WFC) and personal self-efficacy among career persistent women in India. Further, this…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between work-family conflict (WFC) and personal self-efficacy among career persistent women in India. Further, this relationship was explained with the help of the mediating role of perceived managerial support.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 510 career persistent women working in the Information Technology (IT) sector in India. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling and mediation was tested using Process- Macro.

Findings

Findings depicted a positive relationship between WFC and professional self-efficacy demand and self-efficacy challenges. Perceived managerial support was also found to be positively related professional self-efficacy. Furthermore, perceived managerial support was found to have a significant mediating effect in WFC and professional self-efficacy relationships.

Originality/value

Findings of the study may enhance the understanding of WFC in emerging economies, as most of the research has been done in the western context. Findings of the study are crucial, as it highlights the relationship between WFC and professional self-efficacy in the presence of perceived managerial support. Moreover, the paper uniquely discusses the role of WFC in professional self-efficacy among career persistent women in IT sector.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Swati Singh, Ralf Wagner and Katharina Raab

This study aims to investigate driving factors for wine tourists to revisit Indian vineyards. It explores the motivation for Indians engaged in wine tourism and specific…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate driving factors for wine tourists to revisit Indian vineyards. It explores the motivation for Indians engaged in wine tourism and specific behaviors related thereto. Framed in the theory of planned behavior, this paper proposes a conceptual model of revisit intentions for wine tourism. This model covers environmental concerns, escapism, countryside lifestyle, entertainment and spillovers of international traveling as direct antecedents for the revisit intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach was adopted for this research. Data was gathered through a standardized questionnaire from 141 vineyard tourists in Nashik, India and evaluated by fitting a structural equation model.

Findings

Important drivers for wine tourists revisit intentions are countryside lifestyle and spillovers of international travel. Notably, entertainment does not have a significant direct effect, but a substantial impact moderated by escapism. Environmental concerns have a negative impact. The escapism component is the most influential motivation for revisiting the Indian vineyards.

Research limitations/implications

The attractiveness of vineyards visits in contrast to nearby tourist attractions needs to be clarified, e.g. by calibrating gravitation models.

Practical implications

Escapism is a substantial antecedent for the revisit intention of the vineyards while environmental concerns are its major barrier.

Social implications

Countryside lifestyle contributes to overcoming the disadvantage of the contemporary hectic society of the Indian middle class and preserving Indian roots along with modernizing lifestyles.

Originality/value

The first evidence of Indian wine tourists revisits intentions. The current research fills a research gap by examining India’s wine tourism phenomenon.

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Case study
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Swati Singh, Sudhir Naib and Kartikeya Singh

The case presents an ideal platform for discussing the branding strategy, brand elements and the factors that contributed to success of an entrepreneurial venture in the…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The case presents an ideal platform for discussing the branding strategy, brand elements and the factors that contributed to success of an entrepreneurial venture in the quick-service restaurant (QSR) segment. Further, it enables students to discuss changes that are necessitated as the firm looks for new growth avenues. After working through the case and assignment questions, students will be able to analyze the entrepreneurial journey of a startup in red ocean markets by assessing the factors that contributed to its success; comprehend the importance of branding strategy for small business – choosing/designing of brand elements and selecting the positioning strategy; and assess changes needed in the branding strategy over time and devise strategies for the continued success of the firm.

Case overview/synopsis

Kolkata-based QSR chain Wow! Momo was bootstrapped with a meager INR 30,000 in 2008 by two school friends Sagar Daryani and Binod Kumar. It went on to become India’s Wow! Momo very first QSR specializing in momos. By the year 2019, Wow! Momo was dishing out India’s favourite street food, “momos” from 300 outlets across 15 cities. It also claimed to have captured 90% market share in the organized momo business. The startup grew at a CAGR of over 50% between 2015 and 2019 and reported INR 1.19bn revenue in financial year 2019 with an EBITDA of 9.3%. Wow Momo Foods Pvt. Ltd (WMF), the parent company of Wow! Momo, had tasted stupendous success within a short period and set an ambitious goal of achieving revenue of INR 10bn by 2023–2024. Wow! Momo had achieved top of mind recall among the target customers and was also vying for the same share of wallet as formidable international giants such as McDonald’s, Domino’s, Burger King and KFC. However, compared to these large players, Wow! Momo offered a limited menu and a smaller average ticket size. At the same time, Wow! Momo’s market share was also threatened by a host of branded momo players that offered a similar menu and pricing. Both these factors did not argue well for WMF’s mammoth growth objective. Achieving revenue of INR 1.19bn in a matter of just 10 years was no small feat, but reaching targeted INR 10bn in half that time needed a different game plan altogether. The founders clearly needed to rethink their strategies for the next phase of growth. What would be the next growth driver for the company? Should it look for greener pastures outside India? Was it time to diversify the menu and think beyond momos? If so, then should new items be added to existing menu or a new brand be launched altogether? The case maps the journey of two entrepreneurs as they went on to set up a successful QSR chain. It examines their trials and tribulations as well as successful implementation of marketing strategy. It also looks at the dilemmas faced by a startup as it searches for new avenues for growth.

Complexity academic level

Graduate and postgraduate courses in Management.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Swati Singh and Ralf Wagner

This paper aims to focus on how home-grown Indian companies explored the potential of Indian middle class and realized an opportunity to seize the market gap not catered…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on how home-grown Indian companies explored the potential of Indian middle class and realized an opportunity to seize the market gap not catered by MNCs in India. Across three distinct business contexts, the authors describe the companies’ procedures of developing segment-specific offerings. Doing so, the authors outline novel strategies implemented by these companies to cater to specific needs of the segments.

Design/methodology/approach

Seizing Bandura’s (1986) framework that stresses on the role of cognitive, vicarious, self-reflective and self-regulatory processes, the authors develop a four-layered model of the Indian middle class consumers. Building upon this model, they took multiple case (three caselets) approach for illustrating the strategies of home-grown companies. The authors identify their potential to explore the unknown terrains of various market segments and rework with unique local solutions.

Findings

The study highlights the power of home-grown companies over MNCs in terms of better market understanding and realistic offerings best suited to their needs. Across the divergent business contexts the companies’ strategies have four features in common: customer targeting and developing; localization of business models, particularly services; relating the products to the Indian society; and ethnocentrism and pride.

Research limitations/implications

This study gives priority to a “thick” description of the proceedings without claiming causality. The authors limit this qualitative investigation to pinpointing congruence and contradictions to previous established results.

Practical implications

A key implication of this paper is the relevance of linking firm’s strategy to social-psychological development of customers in emerging economies component. This study provides critical insights for both managers and policymakers on the economic and social upswing as socially responsible and ethical practices are likely to gain public awareness.

Originality/value

The study’s originality springs from understanding the domestic company’s strategies when facing the pressure of (mainly Western) MNCs entering the emerging economies markets. While the latter takes advantage of economies of scale, country of origin effects and the powerful brands, the home-grown businesses are forced to develop divergent advantages and capabilities. Notably, earlier literature focused on changed demand pattern brought by MNCs in emerging economies and not on later part whereby, home-grown companies carve a space for themselves with specially designed improved products and innovative strategies.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Swati Singh and Sita Vanka

The purpose of the article is to highlight the importance of sponsorship in the career advancement of women and how it can also promote diversity in leadership.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the article is to highlight the importance of sponsorship in the career advancement of women and how it can also promote diversity in leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the PwC’s Breakthrough program illustration to demonstrate how the potential of sponsorship can be leveraged to enhance diversity.

Findings

Research in leadership, diversity, and inclusion indicates that the leadership gender gap is a major challenge faced by organizations. Most of the organizations employ mentorship as a strategy for women’s career development. However, it is difficult to assess the measurable impact of this on the careers of women and how it could help in improving diversity in leadership roles. The findings suggest that sponsorship, which is an action-oriented strategy can complement mentoring and bring desired results.

Originality/value

The paper analyses the role of mentoring and sponsorship in the career development of women. The paper also highlights the differences between mentorship and sponsorship. Furthermore, it demonstrates the importance of sponsorship in promoting diversity with the help of PwC’s illustration.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Swati Singh and Sita Vanka

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of the employee voice in the present era. This paper discusses the drawbacks of not attending to employee voice…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of the employee voice in the present era. This paper discusses the drawbacks of not attending to employee voice, benefits of listening to it and strategies, as well as the methods of capturing the voice of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses illustration to explain how Cisco used employee voice to revamp its HR.

Findings

The research on this area indicates that although listening to employee voice is beneficial, most organizations ignore it. The findings suggest that the voice of employee cannot be ignored in the technology-led era, as employees have many platforms to raise their concerns. Additionally, ignoring their voice can be perilous. Attending to employee voice brings many advantages, and thus it should be prioritized, promoted and practiced. The paper carries implications for HR managers, business leaders and researchers in this field.

Originality/value

This paper uniquely discusses the significance of employee voice in the present era. It also presents the strategies and methods to capture employee voice. Furthermore, it demonstrates the benefits of attending to employee voice with the help of an illustration.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Kriti Priya Gupta, Preeti Bhaskar and Swati Singh

Government employees have various challenges of adopting e-government which include administrative problems, technological challenges, infrastructural problems, lack of…

Abstract

Purpose

Government employees have various challenges of adopting e-government which include administrative problems, technological challenges, infrastructural problems, lack of trust on computer applications, security concerns and the digital divide. The purpose of this paper is to identify the most salient factors that influence the employee adoption of e-government in India as perceived by government employees involved in e-government service delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first identifies different factors influencing the employee adoption of e-government on the basis of literature review and then finds their relative importance by prioritizing them using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). The AHP is a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) tool which combines all the factors into a hierarchical model and quantitatively measures their importance through pair-wise comparisons (Saaty, 1980). Eleven influencing factors of employee adoption of e-government have been identified, which are categorized under four main factors, namely, “employee’s personal characteristics”, “technical factors”, “organizational factors” and “trust”. The data pertaining to pair-wise comparisons of various factors and sub-factors related to the study is collected from ten senior government employees working with different departments and bodies of the Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi.

Findings

Based on the results obtained, the findings reveal that “organizational factors” and “technical factors” are the two most important factors which influence the intention of government employees to adopt e-government. Moreover, “training”, “technical infrastructure”, “access speed”, “technical support” and “trust” in infrastructure are the top five sub-factors which are considered to be important for the employee adoption of e-government.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations regarding the methodology used in the study is that the rating scale used in the AHP is conceptual. There are chances of biasing while making pair-wise comparisons of different factors. Therefore, due care should be taken while deciding relative scores to different factors. Also, some factors and sub-factors selected, for the model may have interrelationships such as educational level and training; computer skills and trust; etc., and these interrelationships are not considered by the AHP, which is a limitation of the present study. In that case, the analytic network process (ANP) can be a better option. Therefore, this study can be further extended by considering some other factors responsible for e-government adoption by employees and applying the ANP in the revised model.

Practical implications

The results of the study may help government organizations, to evaluate critical factors of employee adoption of e-government. This may help them in achieving cost-effective implementation of e-government applications by efficiently managing their resources. Briefly, the findings of the study imply that government departments should provide sufficient training and support to their employees for enhancing their technical skills so that they can use the e-government applications comfortably. Moreover, the government departments should also ensure fast access speed of the e-government applications so that the employees can carry out their tasks efficiently.

Originality/value

Most of the existing literature on e-government is focused on citizens’ point of view, and very few studies have focused on employee adoption of e-government (Alshibly and Chiong, 2015). Moreover, these studies have majorly used generic technology adoption models which are generally applicable to situations where technology adoption is voluntary. As employee adoption of e-government is not voluntary, the present study proposes a hierarchy of influencing factors and sub-factors of employee adoption of e-government, which is more relevant to the situations where technology adoption is mandatory. Also, most of the previous studies have used statistical methods such as multiple regression analysis or structural equation modelling for examining the significant factors influencing the e-government adoption. The present study contributes to this area by formulating the problem as an MCDM problem and by using the AHP as the methodology to determine the weights of various factors influencing adoption of e-government by employees.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 19 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Swati Singh, Ankur Kaushal and Ashok Kumar

There is an immense concern in the international community about controlling the outburst of infectious diseases. An essential step towards diminishing it is the…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an immense concern in the international community about controlling the outburst of infectious diseases. An essential step towards diminishing it is the development of an adequate detection system. Among the huge plethora of microorganisms which may infect the human body, Streptococcus pyogenes is important one which infects the upper respiratory tract leading to sore throat, which eventually develops into rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in the absence of timely treatment. A major process in controlling the infection is to detect it at an early stage. Hence, there is a need to develop detection tools which are both rapid and reliable.

Design/methodology/approach

Different types of diagnostic methods are available for identification, but the most commonly used are culturing, staining and rapid antigen detection tests. For better sensitivity and specificity, this review describes the development of biosensor. Compared with the current available methods, which are usually cumbersome, time-consuming and expensive, this approach features sequence specificity, cost efficiency, rapid and ease of use.

Findings

This review outlines various sensors which are available for the detection of Streptococcus pyogenes which causes human RHD. The working scheme of the sensors, their sensitivity and limitation of detection has been described in the review.

Originality/value

The review fulfills an acknowledged the need to study various sensors that are available for the detection of Streptococcus pyogenes, causing human RHD.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Case study
Publication date: 15 November 2019

Sudhir Naib and Swati Singh

The case explores information technology (IT) company Mindtree’s journey of 20 years from the time it was founded in 1999 to be different from others, and how it became a…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The case explores information technology (IT) company Mindtree’s journey of 20 years from the time it was founded in 1999 to be different from others, and how it became a target for acquisition by an Indian diversified conglomerate in 2019. It offers insights into developing organizational culture and values in an organization, threats faced by a company when promoters dilute their shareholding, and the strategies followed by the acquirer and the target firm. It also deals with the challenges in the acquisition of a knowledge service digital firm. After working through the case and assignment questions, students will be able to: identify the circumstances under which a company can become a target for hostile takeover; describe motivations of the acquirer firm in an acquisition; distinguish between acquisition and hostile takeover, and discuss salient features of Securities and Exchange Board of India (substantial acquisition of shares and takeover) regulations, 2011; list the defenses a target firm can adopt to ward off hostile acquirer; explore strategies followed by acquirer and target firms; analyze important ingredients of organization culture, and importance of cultural congruence in an acquisition; and discuss challenges faced by an acquirer in India, namely, legal, retention of clients and key people in the target firm particularly in hostile environment.

Case overview/synopsis

The case explores how ten IT professionals founded mid-tier IT services company Mindtree in 1999 in Bengaluru, India (home to Infosys and Wipro) to be different from others – by inserting themselves at a higher level in the value chain, being philanthropic as a part of broader business strategy to attract a certain kind of employee and customer. It developed a culture of equality, consideration and respect. Its attrition rate of 12 to 13 per cent was significantly lower than the Industries. Mindtree crossed annual revenue of US$1bn for FY 2019 and was growing at twice the industry’s growth rate. The most attractive part was that its proportion of revenue from digital services was about 50 per cent as compared to 25-35 per cent of other services vendors. With time, the share of promoters/founders declined and increased one investor’s shareholding of V. G. Siddhartha and his related entities. In early March 2019, the promoters’ stake was 13.32 per cent while Siddhartha had 20.32 per cent. Larsen and Toubro (L&T) one of India’s conglomerate entered into a share purchase agreement on March 18, 2019 with Siddhartha to acquire his 20.32 per cent stake. Immediately, L&T asked its broker to purchase up to 15 per cent of share capital of Mindtree at a price not exceeding INR 980 per share (each share of face value INR 10). This would trigger an open offer by L&T to purchase additional 31 per cent shares of Mindtree. The action of hostile takeover bid by L&T evoked emotional criticism from Mindtree founders. Mindtree efforts to defend itself could not materialize. L&T’s stake crossed 26 per cent on May 16, 2019. After Indian regulator SEBI’s approval, L&T’s open offer to buy shares from Mindtree shareholders commenced on June 17, 2019. The case examines motivation of the acquirer firm particularly when it is a conglomerate, and how a well-performing company became a target for hostile takeover. It looks at vulnerabilities of a target firm, and defensive steps a firm can take to fence itself against such takeover. The case also explores how organizational culture is built in a people-oriented business, namely, digital services, and what role it plays in a merger of two firms.

Complexity academic level

The case is suited for postgraduate students of management, as well as those undergoing executive courses in management.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 26 May 2021

Amit K. Verma, Narendra Kumar, Mandeep Singh and Ravi P. Agarwal

In this article, the authors consider the following nonlinear singular boundary value problem (SBVP) known as Lane–Emden equations, −u″(t)-(α/t) u′(t) = g(t, u), 0 < t < 1…

Abstract

Purpose

In this article, the authors consider the following nonlinear singular boundary value problem (SBVP) known as Lane–Emden equations, −u″(t)-(α/t) u′(t) = g(t, u), 0 < t < 1 where α ≥ 1 subject to two-point and three-point boundary conditions. The authors propose to develop a novel method to solve the class of Lane–Emden equations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors improve the modified variation iteration method (VIM) proposed in [JAAC, 9(4) 1242–1260 (2019)], which greatly accelerates the convergence and reduces the computational task.

Findings

The findings revealed that either exact or highly accurate approximate solutions of Lane–Emden equations can be computed with the proposed method.

Originality/value

Novel modification is made in the VIM that provides either exact or highly accurate approximate solutions of Lane-Emden equations, which does not exist in the literature.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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