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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Remi Charpin

This paper examines nationalism as a driver of political risk and how it can lead to supply chain disruptions for foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines nationalism as a driver of political risk and how it can lead to supply chain disruptions for foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs).

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual research based on a review of the literature on nationalism and supply chain risk management.

Findings

This research unveils how economic nationalism could engender supply chain disruptions via discriminatory practices toward all foreign MNEs and how national animosity may generate additional risks for the MNEs of nations in conflict with one another. These discriminatory practices include an array of host government and grassroots actions targeting foreign MNEs. While economic nationalism and national animosity emanate from within a host country, they may stimulate geopolitical crises outside the host country and thereby affect the international supply chains of foreign MNEs.

Research limitations/implications

This research lays the foundation for analytical and empirical researchers to integrate key elements of nationalism into their studies and recommends propositions and datasets to study these notions.

Practical implications

This study shows the implications that nationalist drivers of supply chain disruptions have for foreign MNEs and thus can help managers to proactively mitigate such disruptions.

Originality/value

This study reveals the importance of integrating notions of national identity and national history in supply chain research, since they play a key role in the emergence of policies and events responsible for supply chain disruptions.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2016

Veena Mani and Mathangi Krishnamurthy

This chapter is a collation and review of literature that can be considered to form the terrain of sports studies in India. It attempts two broad tasks: firstly, to…

Abstract

This chapter is a collation and review of literature that can be considered to form the terrain of sports studies in India. It attempts two broad tasks: firstly, to aggregate these studies, and secondly, to predict the very possibility of a sociology of sport in India. To this end, this chapter is classified into three separate yet intertwined themes: modernity and nationalism; sub-nationalisms or regional nationalisms; and gender, masculinities, and culture. The first section looks at questions of modernity and nationalism within the Indian context through a close reading of studies on sports like field hockey and cricket. The second section is a critical look at the role of sub-nationalisms in complicating the notion of a singular nationalism, as played out in the domain of football in India. Lastly, the chapter examines questions of gender, especially masculinities, as a consistent yet plural presence in all of these literatures. These themes are neither exclusive nor all encompassing, and the chapter produces them in continuity as well as in rupture with one another. It concludes by speculating upon the possibilities and challenges for a sociology of sport in India, with suggestions for possible methodological interventions.

Details

Sociology of Sport: A Global Subdiscipline in Review
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-050-3

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Jeff Hai-chi Loo

The persistent growth of ‘nativists’ in Hong Kong not only highlighted people's consideration over mainlandization, it also stimulates Beijing's nerve on national…

Abstract

Purpose

The persistent growth of ‘nativists’ in Hong Kong not only highlighted people's consideration over mainlandization, it also stimulates Beijing's nerve on national security. This paper adopts a critical perspective to explore the development of ‘Hong Kong Nationalism’ that emerged in 2015. It will show the development of ‘Hong Kong nationalism’ is a phenomenon compounded by the creation of critical academics, government exaggeration, and pro-Beijing media labeling. In fact, this phenomenon leads to the suppression of political space for critical opposition.

Design/methodology/approach

The interaction between Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) government, central government, critical academics, and pro-Beijing media will be used to adopt a conceptual framework to show how their interrelationship would derive tremendous impacts to the development of ‘Hong Kong Nationalism.’ It will further investigate some implications for the further political development in Hong Kong.

Findings

The development of ‘Hong Kong Nationalism’ illustrates the triangular relations between critical academic, HKSAR and the Beijing government, and pro-Beijing media. The critical academics create and imagine such ‘Hong Kong Nationalism’ with Hong Kong's political destiny that stimulates the nerve of Beijing and HKSAR on territorial integrity. The ‘imagined nationalism’ advocated by critical and opposition academics and advanced by the activists not only opened the Pandora's box that derives a Trojan horse scenario for the development of pan-democratic camp which affects the democracy movement tremendously.

Originality

This paper is the first academic paper to explore ‘Hong Kong Nationalism’ through analyzing the discourse advocated by critical academics. This paper can also fill in the gap from existing literature about social movement in Hong Kong as most of them ignored the influence of radical nativist movement.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Jay Wang

Drawing on an interdisciplinary scholarship, this study seeks to explore and explain the nature and characteristics of the emerging phenomenon of “consumer nationalism”…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on an interdisciplinary scholarship, this study seeks to explore and explain the nature and characteristics of the emerging phenomenon of “consumer nationalism” and its critical impact on corporate reputation in the global marketplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper sets out to define the concept of consumer nationalism and then formulate an analytical framework of consumer nationalism dynamics that provides a deeper, more precise understanding of the various elements at play in a consumer nationalism crisis and the process by which multinational businesses and their corporate reputation might be affected by such nationalistic advocacy. Based on the proposed model, the paper identifies and discusses management options to protect and maintain corporate reputation in the event of consumer nationalistic outbursts. In conclusion, the paper outlines general recommendations for pursuing public/corporate diplomacy and for proactively managing consumers' perception of brands' national association as part of pre‐crisis communication strategy.

Findings

As nationalism goes hand‐in‐hand with globalization, consumer nationalism cannot be ignored.

Originality/value

The study provides a deeper understanding of what consumer nationalism is and how it may affect multinational businesses. It offers a comprehensive account of this emerging phenomenon by integrating existing perspectives on the nationalistic consumer base and “focusing events”, and introduces the concept of corporate susceptibility and its components. The study also highlights the centrality of corporate reputation during consumer nationalistic outbursts, and offers suggestions as to how multinational businesses may take steps to fend off the damage consumer nationalism events may do to their reputation.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

A. Graeme Hyslop

In his explication of nationalist activity in Scotland since 1707, Tony Dickson, although falling into the realms of economic expressivism, must be commended for raising a…

Abstract

In his explication of nationalist activity in Scotland since 1707, Tony Dickson, although falling into the realms of economic expressivism, must be commended for raising a number of important issues which have until recently been elusive, or, at least, never considered together. It is the inter‐relation of these issues which, for the first time, allows us to begin to develop a specific theory of Scottish Nationalism. These issues may be compartmentalised into three broad pre‐requisites:

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2007

Jian Wang and Zhiying Wang

This paper aims to illustrate the concept of “consumer nationalism” and its implications for corporate reputation management in China.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate the concept of “consumer nationalism” and its implications for corporate reputation management in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses three incidents involving companies from different countries of origin as cases in point to explore Chinese consumers' infusion of national identity into the public discourse concerning multinational businesses in the Chinese market.

Findings

It is demonstrated that the emotional power of nationalism is a critical component of the political marketplace in contemporary China and at times becomes central to Chinese consumers' relationship with global brands. Consumer nationalism controversies put the involved companies and brands in the spotlight of confrontation with local citizenry. The salience of consumer national advocacy underscores the tensions and contradictions in China's encounter with globalization.

Research limitations/implications

Conceptually, this paper presents evidence for the necessity to take into account nationalism in understanding contemporary Chinese consumer behavior.

Practical implications

The paper discusses lessons learned through the cases and make three general recommendations on communication strategies for managing consumer nationalism in the Chinese market.

Originality/value of paper

The paper locates the conceptual home for the social phenomenon of national advocacy in the process of consumption and its implications for corporate reputation management.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

Syed H. Akhter

The goals of the paper are to propose, measure, and empirically test the expectations model of economic nationalism. The model posits that economic nationalism is…

Abstract

Purpose

The goals of the paper are to propose, measure, and empirically test the expectations model of economic nationalism. The model posits that economic nationalism is reflected in people's expectations of their government, domestic firms, and the general public, in terms of restricting the activities of foreign firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A confirmatory factor analysis is conducted to test the model, using the LISREL procedure.

Findings

Results show acceptable fit for the proposed model. Reliability of each of the three dimensions of economic nationalism is in the acceptable range. A nomological validity test showed that economic nationalism is related to other constructs not included in the model.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the model is that it is based on a single sample. Future studies can test the generalizability of model with samples from different countries.

Practical implications

The implication of the study is that increasing globalization might lead to an increase in economic nationalism. Business executives, therefore, need to focus not only on the benefits that they will derive from entering a country, but also the benefits they will deliver to the domestic economy by entering the country.

Originality/value

The paper presents an expectations model of economic nationalism. The model is based on the premise that people's expectations of their government, domestic businesses, and the general public in terms of their role in restricting the activities of foreign firms are reflective of economic nationalism. The more people expect of these three players the more economically nationalistic they will be. The value of the paper is to researchers in international business and global marketing and to business executives involved in managing global operations.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Nailah Ayub and Karen A. Jehn

To develop a theory to explain how national diversity within a workgroup can lead to intra‐group conflict, and how this effect may be exacerbated in the presence of…

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a theory to explain how national diversity within a workgroup can lead to intra‐group conflict, and how this effect may be exacerbated in the presence of nationalistic attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

Defines and discusses what national diversity is and why it is relevant to multinational organizations. Then constructs a multi‐level, theoretical framework to propose the conditions under which national diversity may lead to high levels of conflict. Describes and explains the role of nationalism (i.e. individuals' attitude towards their and others' nationalities) in diverse workgroups and explore the moderating effect of nationalism on the relationship between national diversity and intra‐group conflict.

Findings

Proposes that in nationally diverse workgroups the presence of workgroup members with strong nationalistic attitudes (e.g. ingroup favoritism and outgroup rejection) will exacerbate the likelihood that national diversity may lead to relationship conflict and process conflict, and that it will weaken the likelihood that national diversity leads to task conflict.

Originality/value

The model demonstrates the necessity of examining national diversity and the factors and conditions, such as the presence of nationalistic attitudes that may hinder the potential of a nationally diverse workgroup.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2017

Siu Keung Cheung and Wing Sang Law

The majority of Hong Kong filmmakers have pursued co-production with China filmmakers for having the Mainland market at the expense of local styles and sensitivities. To…

Abstract

Purpose

The majority of Hong Kong filmmakers have pursued co-production with China filmmakers for having the Mainland market at the expense of local styles and sensitivities. To many critics, the two-part series of Ip Man and Ip Man II provide a paradigmatic case of film co-production that sell the tricks of Chinese kung fu, regurgitating the overblown Chinese nationalism against Japanese and kwai-lo. The purpose of this study is to rectify such observation of the Ip Man series.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors read the series deconstructively as a postcolonial text in which Hong Kong identity is inscribed in the negotiated space in between different versions of Chinese nationalism.

Findings

The analysis points to the varying subversive features in the series from which Hong Kong’s colonial experiences are tacitly displayed, endorsed and rewritten into the Chinese nationalistic discourse whose dominance is questioned, if not debased.

Originality/value

This paper advances new research insights into the postcolonial reinvention of kung fu film and, by implication, the Hong Kong cinema in general.

Details

Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1871-2673

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Leanne White

The purpose of this paper is to examine two significant political advertising campaigns which used the “It’s Time” slogan and to reflect on how these related to official…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine two significant political advertising campaigns which used the “It’s Time” slogan and to reflect on how these related to official, popular and commercial nationalism in Australia. The paper is primarily concerned with two main issues: identifying and examining the variety of images of Australia in two key television advertisements, and exploring the methods by which advertising agencies created positive images of Australia and Australians in the two campaigns. It specifically highlights the significance of the “It’s Time” campaign, which is relevant for scholars and advertisers seeking to understand effective political communication.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines television advertisements by using semiotics as the principal methodology. The research methodology devised for the advertisements consists of two main components: a shot combination analysis, also known as a shot-by-shot analysis, and a semiological reading of the visual and acoustic channels of the advertisement.

Findings

This paper examines the use of commercial nationalism in television advertising. As one of many social and cultural influences, advertisements assist the individual in understanding their notion of themselves and their relationship with the wider community – be it local, national, regional or global. The primary focus of this research is the phenomenon of commercial nationalism – the adoption of national signifiers in the marketplace. However, by examining the more general discourse on nationalism, particularly the voice of official nationalism – the promotion of nationalism by the nation-state (or those aspiring to power), the symbiotic relationship between these two complementary brands of nationalism is explored.

Originality/value

The methodology adopted for analysing the two political advertising campaigns offers conceptual and practical value. It provides a consistent set of terms and concepts for further research to build upon. The paper provides insights for the marketing or examination of advertising campaigns. The paper demonstrates the power of market research to inform a framing strategy for a political campaign. The paper contributes to the body of knowledge in this area and thus society’s understanding of these important periods in the nation’s history. In particular, the paper provides an exploration into the “It’s Time” campaign and how it mobilised a broader cultural awakening to engineer success at the ballot box in 1972. The two case studies examined in this paper are relevant to political scientists and media and communication scholars.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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