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1 – 10 of 101
Article
Publication date: 30 July 2021

Anthony Beresford and Stephen Pettit

This paper provides a contextualised review of research in the area of humanitarian and emergency relief logistics, providing insights with particular emphasis on lessons learned…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides a contextualised review of research in the area of humanitarian and emergency relief logistics, providing insights with particular emphasis on lessons learned. The paper tracks the evolution of research against the development of partner networks and key global events; information was collated and assimilated from cross-cutting themes such as disaster preparedness, emergency response structures and the transferability of commercial-world concepts and principles (such as sustainability) into volatile and fragile environments. It concludes by suggesting possible future challenges which could steer humanitarian response on the ground and will influence the path of academic research going forward.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a general review of work undertaken in the area of Humanitarian Logistics. Use is made of vignettes of case studies in order to provide focus to the discussion and to highlight key issues that emerged from the research reviewed.

Findings

The findings show that there are several new areas of research which will need to be addressed in the humanitarian logistics arena. The discussion demonstrates that research into crisis response is arguably even more important today than it has been previously. Research therefore likely needs to be expanded considerably over the next decade and beyond.

Originality/value

This paper contextualises and synthesises past research into humanitarian logistics responses, highlights key themes and suggests areas for further research.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Dong-Wook Kwak, Vasco Sanchez Rodrigues, Robert Mason, Stephen Pettit and Anthony Beresford

International supply chains can be severely disrupted by failures in international logistics processes. Therefore, an understanding of international logistics risks, or causes of…

3123

Abstract

Purpose

International supply chains can be severely disrupted by failures in international logistics processes. Therefore, an understanding of international logistics risks, or causes of failure, how these may interact with each other and how they can be mitigated are imperatives for the smooth operation of international supply chains. The purpose of this paper is to specifically investigate the interactions between international logistics risks within the prevailing structures of international supply chains and highlights how these risks may be inter-connected and amplified. A new dynamic supply chain logistics risk analysis model is proposed which is novel as it provides a holistic understanding of the risk event interactivity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies interpretive structural modelling to data collected from a survey of leading supply chain practitioners, in order to analyse their perspectives of risk elements and interactions. The risk elements and their contextual relationship were derived empirically through the use of focus groups and subsequent Delphi study. The two stages of the research rely on experts’ views on risk events and clusters and the level of interactions among those clusters.

Findings

A key finding of this research is that supply chain practitioner’s perception of risk consists of inter-connected four levels: value streams risks; information and relationship risks; risks in international supply chain activities; and external environment. In particular, since level 2 risk creates feedback loops of risks, risk management at level 2 can dampen the amplification effect and the strength of the interactions.

Practical implications

Several managerial implications are drawn. First, the research guides managers in the identification and evaluation of risk events which can impact the performance of their international logistics supply chain operations. Second, evidence is presented that supports the proposition that the relationships with trading partners and LSPs, and the degree of logistics information exchange, are critical to prevent, or at least mitigate, logistics risks which can substantially affect the responsiveness of the international supply chain.

Originality/value

The main contribution to knowledge that this study offers to the literature on supply chain risk management is the development of a supply chain logistics risk analysis model which includes both risk elements and interactions. The research demonstrates the importance of taking into account risk interactions in the process of identification and evaluation of risk events.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Bahana Wiradanti, Stephen Pettit, Andrew Potter and Wessam Abouarghoub

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on peripheral ports, hub ports and concentration – deconcentration factors. This is an issue, as investments in port…

1337

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on peripheral ports, hub ports and concentration – deconcentration factors. This is an issue, as investments in port development in more peripheral locations are challenging due to the difficult financial situation currently faced by the maritime industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a narrative literature review focusing on peripherality in the context of seaports and transport. Moreover, it gathers the reasons why ports concentrate–deconcentrate, and how these factors evolve over time.

Findings

This paper develops a future research agenda for peripheral ports.

Practical implications

The paper provides insights for ports in developing countries in their efforts to upgrade their port facilities and infrastructure.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the research on ports in peripheral locations which have been under studied compared to larger hub ports.

Details

Maritime Business Review, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-3757

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2021

Moses Shang-Min Lin, Andrew Potter and Stephen Pettit

With the diverse, heterogeneous nature of relationships being a key characteristic of service supply chains, their management is an important area for consideration. This is…

Abstract

Purpose

With the diverse, heterogeneous nature of relationships being a key characteristic of service supply chains, their management is an important area for consideration. This is particularly true in the maritime logistics industry, yet the factors that lead to this heterogeneity are less well understood. This paper aims to explore the structure of relationships within the maritime logistics network and determine why they vary.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were carried out with 41 practitioners involved in the Taiwanese maritime logistics network. The data from these interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis and quasi-quantification.

Findings

The interviews identify that structural holes exist within this maritime logistics network, and that these particularly influence the relationships within this sector with ports being significantly affected. However, five factors are particularly identified that can further impact the strength of these relationships. Often, weak links between ports and both cargo owners and freight forwarders emerge as value-added services are provided by the network.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are framed in a Taiwanese context, where cultural and political norms may give different results to other geographical regions. The research also limits consideration to containerized flows.

Practical implications

By providing detailed insights into relationship structures within the maritime logistics network, managers can take steps to develop appropriate links with other members of the network, reflecting upon the factors that lead to heterogeneity.

Originality/value

This paper expands knowledge on logistics service supply chains, identifying the importance of relationships in a derived demand environment. For maritime researchers, specific factors leading to relationship heterogeneity in the network are detailed, to inform future research.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Peter H. Tatham and Stephen J. Pettit

The purpose of this paper is to provide an introduction of the two parts of the Special Edition of the journal devoted to the challenges of humanitarian aid logistics. To achieve…

6017

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an introduction of the two parts of the Special Edition of the journal devoted to the challenges of humanitarian aid logistics. To achieve this, an overview of the humanitarian logistic field is provided focussing on a number of key areas in which the principles and practices supporting commercial supply network management (SNM) have the potential to offer significant improvement in the efficiency and/or effectiveness of the humanitarian logistics preparation and response.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a conceptual discussion of issues of SNM in a humanitarian aid context, linked to the more specific discussions of the contribution of the research presented by the authors of the papers accepted for the special editions.

Findings

The paper discusses the concept of SNM and argues that the fundamental principles that have been the subject of considerable academic scrutiny are equally applicable to the humanitarian logistic field – albeit, in some cases, the specific environment may alter the balance of risk/benefit for particular approaches.

Originality/value

The application of commercial SNM theory and practice has received limited consideration within the humanitarian aid logistics literature to date. This paper is designed to redress this shortfall. As a result, it is hoped that it will act as a catalyst for further research and to widen and deepen the resultant debate with a view to improving the outcome for those affected by current and future disasters.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 40 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Stephen Pettit and Anthony Beresford

Critical success factors (CSFs) have been widely used in the context of commercial supply chains. However, in the context of humanitarian aid (HA) this is a poorly addressed area…

12943

Abstract

Purpose

Critical success factors (CSFs) have been widely used in the context of commercial supply chains. However, in the context of humanitarian aid (HA) this is a poorly addressed area and this paper therefore aims to set out the key areas for research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a conceptual discussion of CSFs as applied to the HA sector. A detailed literature review is undertaken to identify CSFs in a commercial context and to consider their applicability to the HA sector.

Findings

CSFs have not previously been identified for the HA sector, an issue addressed in this paper.

Research limitations/implications

The main constraint on this paper is that CSFs have not been previously considered in the literature as applied to HA. The relevance of CSFs will therefore need to be tested in the HA environment and qualitative research is needed to inform further work.

Practical implications

This paper informs the HA community of key areas of activity which have not been fully addressed and offers.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the understanding of supply chain management in an HA context.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Ruth Banomyong and Apichat Sopadang

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for the development of emergency logistics response models. The proposition of a conceptual framework is in itself not…

3260

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for the development of emergency logistics response models. The proposition of a conceptual framework is in itself not sufficient and simulation models are further needed in order to help emergency logistics decision makers in refining their preparedness planning process.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a framework proposition with illustrative case study.

Findings

The use of simulation modelling can help enhance the reliability and validity of developed emergency response model.

Research limitations/implications

The emergency response model outcomes are still based on simulated outputs and would still need to be validated in a real‐life environment. Proposing a new or revised emergency logistics response model is not sufficient. Developed logistics response models need to be further validated and simulation modelling can help enhance validity.

Practical implications

Emergency logistics decision makers can make better informed decisions based on simulation model output and can further refine their decision‐making capability.

Originality/value

The paper posits the contribution of simulation modelling as part of the framework for developing and refining emergency logistics response.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 40 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Kirstin Scholten, Pamela Sharkey Scott and Brian Fynes

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of agility in the context of supply chains of humanitarian aid (HA) organizations, particularly non‐government organizations…

4819

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of agility in the context of supply chains of humanitarian aid (HA) organizations, particularly non‐government organizations (NGOs). This responds to the increasing pressure on NGOs to use their resources more strategically if they are to gain donor trust and long‐term commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature‐based approach that extends the commercial supply chain concept of agility to NGOs is combined with the first exploratory semi‐structured interviews of these concepts with five NGO supply chain directors.

Findings

The commercial concept of agility when responding to disaster relief holds strong potential for increasing efficiency and effectiveness, but this application is restrained by the absence of supporting information technology (IT) and the relegation of supply chain management (SCM) to the “back office” by NGOs. This has potential implications for NGOs and other HA agencies.

Research limitations/implications

This paper represents an exploratory study, and an extended pool of interviewees would reinforce the qualitative findings. Planned future research will address this issue.

Practical implications

Practical guidance on how NGOs can proactively manage their organization's ability to respond with agility in a highly pressured environment is provided.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to offer practical guidance to managers of NGOs on strategies available to improve their organization's flexibility and agility, based on theoretical concepts and initial exploratory data. In addition, evidence of how commercial tools apply in a different arena may prompt commercial managers to be more innovative in utilizing and customizing supply chain principles to their particular context of operation.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 40 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2013

Su‐Han Woo, Stephen J. Pettit and Anthony K.C. Beresford

The changing role of seaports in supply chains has been the subject of extensive research in the recent literature. The strategic development of seaport terminals, responding to…

2878

Abstract

Purpose

The changing role of seaports in supply chains has been the subject of extensive research in the recent literature. The strategic development of seaport terminals, responding to the need for closer integration into supply chains, invites a more detailed examination of the influence of the supply chain structures on seaport performance. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the effects of supply chain structures, especially the degree of integration of seaports into supply chains, on seaport performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The parameters for a structural equation model were identified in the first instance from the supply chain and seaport operations and management literature. The structural equation model itself was then devised, and subsequently refined, using data from Korean seaport terminal operators, shipping companies and freight forwarding companies. The structural equation model was used to assess the level of supply chain integration of seaports and the relationship to port performance.

Findings

The results indicate that the integration of seaports into supply chains has a positive impact on both the effectiveness and the efficiency of seaport performance. In addition, antecedents to seaport supply chain integration are identified; these suggest that a strong orientation to supply chain integration within a port operating company enables the company to adopt and implement a strategy that integrates functions within the port and with other upstream and downstream organisations.

Research limitations/implications

As the field data were geographically limited to one country, extending the findings of this study to other geographical areas may not be possible, although the approach taken, using the structural equation modelling technique, should be transferrable elsewhere. Cross‐validation of the model would widen its applicability to other areas. The paper provides a framework that allows other researchers to examine the level of integration of ports into supply chains.

Practical implications

The potential benefits of closer integration of seaports into supply chains are shown with supply chain integration having a positive effect on port performance. Seaports which do not integrate with their supply chains have a lower level of performance. Thus, enhanced port performance accruing from closer integration would have positive implications both for port and terminal managers and for other supply chain participants.

Originality/value

This study, for the first time, empirically examines the impact of the integration into supply chains of seaports on their performance. This is achieved by the development of a structural equation model which is then tested in the field, thus extending the existing literature which is largely conceptual or descriptive.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

631

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

1 – 10 of 101