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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Eline Ree, Louise A. Ellis and Siri Wiig

To discuss how managers contribute in promoting resilience in healthcare, and to suggest a model of managers' role in supporting resilience and elaborate on how future…

Abstract

Purpose

To discuss how managers contribute in promoting resilience in healthcare, and to suggest a model of managers' role in supporting resilience and elaborate on how future research and implementation studies can use this to further operationalize the concept and promote healthcare resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first provide an overview of and discuss the main approaches to healthcare resilience and research on management and resilience. Second, the authors provide examples on how managers work to promote healthcare resilience during a one-year Norwegian longitudinal intervention study following managers in nursing homes and homecare services in their daily quality and safety work. They use this material to propose a model of management and resilience.

Findings

The authors consider managerial strategies to support healthcare resilience as the strategies managers use to engage people in collaborative and coordinated processes that adapt, enhance or reorganize system functioning, promoting possibilities of learning, growth, development and recovery of the healthcare system to maintain high quality care. The authors’ model illustrates how managers influence the healthcare systems ability to adapt, enhance and reorganize, with high quality care as the key outcome.

Originality/value

In this study, the authors argue that managerial strategies should be considered and operationalized as part of a healthcare system's overall resilience. They propose a new model of managers' role in supporting resilience to be used in practice, interventions and future research projects.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2021

Ingunn Aase, Eline Ree, Terese Johannessen, Elisabeth Holen-Rabbersvik, Line Hurup Thomsen, Torunn Strømme, Berit Ullebust, Lene Schibevaag, Hilda Bø Lyng, Jane O'Hara and Siri Wiig

The purpose is to share strategies, rationales and lessons learnt from user involvement in a quality and safety improvement research project from the practice field in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to share strategies, rationales and lessons learnt from user involvement in a quality and safety improvement research project from the practice field in nursing homes and homecare services.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a viewpoint paper summarizing how researchers and co-researchers from the practice field of nursing homes and homecare services (nurse counsellors from different municipalities, patient ombudsman and next-of-kin representatives/and elderly care organization representant) experienced user involvement through all phases of the research project. The project included implementation of a leadership intervention.

Findings

Multiple strategies of user involvement were applied during the project including partnership in the consortium, employment of user representatives (co-researchers) and user-led research activities. The rationale was to ensure sound context adaptation of the intervention and development of tailor-made activities and tools based on equality and mutual trust in the collaboration. Both university-based researchers and Co-researchers experienced it as useful and necessary to involve or being involved in all phases of the research project, including the designing, planning, intervention implementation, evaluation and dissemination of results.

Originality/value

User involvement in research is a growing field. There is limited focus on this aspect in quality and safety interventions in nursing homes and homecare settings and in projects focussing on the leadership' role in improving quality and safety.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2021

Olena Koval, Ole Andreas Engen, Jacob Kringen and Siri Wiig

The purpose of this rapid scoping review was to map existing literature on risk communication strategies implemented by authorities and aimed at vulnerable immigrants in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this rapid scoping review was to map existing literature on risk communication strategies implemented by authorities and aimed at vulnerable immigrants in the context of pandemics.

Design/methodology/approach

Existing literature on the topic was charted in terms of its nature and volume by summarizing evidence regarding the communication strategies. Literature searches were conducted in Academic Search Premier and CINAHL, databases were searched from 2011 to present on March 31, 2021.

Findings

Five articles met the criteria and were included in this review, pointing at limited research in this area. The findings indicated that a close interaction between communication authorities and immigrants is important. Community education, building trust in communication sources, clear risk communication and inclusive decision-making among all were found to be important when communicating health risks to immigrants.

Research limitations/implications

The primary limitation of this rapid scoping review is that the literature searches were conducted in only two databases, namely, Academic Search Premier and CINAHL. A wider search across several other databases could have given more profound results. Furthermore, some studies where immigrants were conceptualized as, for instance, “disadvantaged groups” might be overseen due to a choice of the search strategy used in this study. There are also certain limitations related to the studies included in this review.

Practical implications

Identifying efficient ways of conveying recommendations may further assist authorities and scientists in developing more effective health-related risk communication.

Originality/value

This study covered health-related risk communication in the context of pandemics, addressing the need to investigate different groups of immigrants and the challenges related to communicating risks to these groups.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Malin Knutsen Glette and Siri Wiig

The purpose of this paper is to increase knowledge of the role organizational factors have in how health personnel make efficiency-thoroughness trade-offs, and how these…

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1022

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase knowledge of the role organizational factors have in how health personnel make efficiency-thoroughness trade-offs, and how these trade-offs potentially affect clinical quality dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a thematic synthesis of the literature concerning health personnel working in clinical, somatic healthcare services, organizational factors and clinical quality.

Findings

Identified organizational factors imposing trade-offs were high workload, time limits, inappropriate staffing and limited resources. The trade-offs done by health personnel were often trade-offs weighing thoroughness (e.g. providing extra handovers or working additional hours) in an environment weighing efficiency (e.g. ward routines of having one single handover and work-hour regulations limiting physicians' work hours). In this context, the health personnel functioned as regulators, balancing efficiency and thoroughness and ensuring patient safety and patient centeredness. However, sometimes organizational factors limited health personnel's flexibility in weighing these aspects, leading to breached medication rules, skipped opportunities for safety debriefings and patients being excluded from medication reviews.

Originality/value

Balancing resources and healthcare demands while maintaining healthcare quality is a large part of health personnel's daily work, and organizational factors are suspected to affect this balancing act. Yet, there is limited research on this subject. With the expected aging of the population and the subsequent pressure on healthcare services' resources, the balancing between efficiency and thoroughness will become crucial in handling increased healthcare demands, while maintaining high-quality care.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2017

Francisco G. Nunes, Janet E. Anderson, Luis M. Martins and Siri Wiig

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of ownership of community pharmacies on the perception of organizational identity and its relationships with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of ownership of community pharmacies on the perception of organizational identity and its relationships with organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was carried out on a sample of pharmacists working in community pharmacies in Portugal. The sample comprised 1,369 pharmacists, of whom 51 percent were owner-managers. Measures of pharmacies’ normative (community health oriented) and utilitarian (business oriented) identities, identity strength (clear and unifying), substantive (stockholder focused) and symbolic (society focused) performance were included.

Findings

Both owners and employed pharmacists rated the normative identity of pharmacies higher than the utilitarian identity. Compared with employed pharmacists, owners perceive a lower level of utilitarian identity, the same level of normative identity, and higher levels of identity strength. Normative identity and identity strength predicted symbolic performance. Normative and utilitarian identities and identity strength predicted substantive performance. The relationship between utilitarian identity and substantive performance was significant among owner pharmacists but not among employed pharmacists.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations include the use of perceptive measures and the focus on the individual level of analysis.

Practical implications

In order to improve pharmacies’ performance, pharmacists who manage community pharmacies are challenged to reconcile tensions arising from the co-existence of business and community health identities and from their own agency (self-serving) and stewardship (altruistic) motives.

Originality/value

This study draws on institutional, identity and stewardship theories to understand how pharmacists, owners and employees, view the identity of community pharmacies and how identity relates to organizational performance.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Harold D. Harlow

This paper aims to build on current analytics and Big Data definitions and strategies from the literature to develop an overall strategic model connecting knowledge…

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1119

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to build on current analytics and Big Data definitions and strategies from the literature to develop an overall strategic model connecting knowledge management strategy (KMS) for intellectual capital (IC) acquisition and business use. It also extends the IC research stages to a fifth stage of IC research including IC strategic intent.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review highlights the connections among strategic intent, firm strategy, KMS and a data analytics strategy aligned with firm and KMS strategic intent. An extended model of the interrelationships is developed from the prior research.

Findings

A model framework was developed from the literature that connects Big Data to achieve the goals of a firm KMS and demonstrates how Big Data analytics (BDA) needs to shift from being a tactical tool to a strategic knowledge management tool directed by the overall strategy and strategic intent of the firm.

Research limitations/implications

The model presented needs to be empirically tested over a sample of companies and periods to determine if performance improves using this model.

Practical implications

Use of this model proposes that strategic intent will be enhanced and improve the capture of intellectual property derived from advanced analytics and increase sustainable advantages at firm.

Social implications

The social implications of lack of strong privacy laws coupled with the possible elimination of millions of knowledge worker jobs creates a pressing need for more research into and identification of firm’s and government’s Big Data strategic use for both good and perhaps evil.

Originality/value

The research in this paper extends current models of IC development and adds strategic intent and collective intelligence as the fifth stage of IC research and presents an overall KMS/BDA model.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

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