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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2010

Stuart Tooley, Jill Hooks and Norida Basnan

Purpose – This chapter aims to identify stakeholder perceptions on the service performance accountability of Malaysian local authorities.Design/methodology/approach – A…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter aims to identify stakeholder perceptions on the service performance accountability of Malaysian local authorities.

Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire survey provides the primary source of information, and both descriptive and analytical methods are employed to support the analysis of the empirical findings.

Findings – The chapter shows that despite a strong interest amongst stakeholders for greater accountability of Malaysian local authorities, a standard definition and scope of accountability has not emerged. However, the findings do indicate a new bond of accountability emerging between local authorities and its broader public than previously existed.

Research limitations – The findings and discussion are limited to the propositions put forward in the questionnaire. Alternative research methods would complement the findings.

Originality/value – The findings contribute to our understanding of accountability as interpreted by key stakeholders of local authorities located within the context of a developing country. This could potentially assist Malaysian public sector administrators whereby, and arguably, enhancing the public accountability of local authorities may contribute to an improvement in the performance management of Malaysian local authorities.

Details

Ethics, Equity, and Regulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-729-5

Book part
Publication date: 18 October 2014

Emmanuel Auber, Elodie Chabaud, Automne Chabernaud, Clément Le Bras-Thomas, Etienne Longueville and Elena Suzat

Great Britain is a laboratory for new techniques of public management; it is therefore an interesting place to look at for people willing to get involved in large public…

Abstract

Purpose

Great Britain is a laboratory for new techniques of public management; it is therefore an interesting place to look at for people willing to get involved in large public organisations. The French ‘institute for local studies’, trains future professionals, selected after graduation or after a working experience, in order to take high positions in local authorities nationwide. Three pairs of trainees belonging to the 2012–2013 group spent two weeks in three local authorities in England, with the purpose of analysing the performance management in these organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

British and French scholars dedicated to public organisations provided the six trainees with a global view of local government and reforms in the United Kingdom. After that, each pair exchanged information with the local authority they would visit; during the two weeks they spent there, an officer followed their works. They interviewed numerous professionals, elected members and unionists, attended meetings and events. Back in France, they presented their findings in several documents. The original subject was measuring and managing performance; in fact, the three pairs went farther and looked over many aspects of the organisations’ functioning.

Findings

Local authorities are facing important budget reductions and appear fragile; they put forward the idea of resilience to express the necessity of using all their resources to deal with a difficult situation. Elected members have a role of political initiative, but they also focus a lot on control, which is much more developed in Britain than in France; managers experience a very difficult period, with a lot of threats on their jobs, teams and projects. In this context, professional networks are very important; peer review is an interesting example of the role of professional exchanges in the search for new solutions. At last, unions don’t seek conflicts but try to accompany changes, lessening their negative consequences on people.

Originality/value

This work is not an academic one but an approach of the reality of organisations analysed by professionals or future professionals of the public sector, in a kind of ‘peer review’ between different countries. This international dimension is interesting, seeing that few in-depth comparisons between local authorities are made, especially between France and Britain.

Details

European Public Leadership in Crisis?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-901-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2022

Harley Williamson, Kristina Murphy, Elise Sargeant and Molly McCarthy

The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated the introduction of extra-ordinary restrictions to mitigate its spread. Authorities rely on the public's voluntary willingness to…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated the introduction of extra-ordinary restrictions to mitigate its spread. Authorities rely on the public's voluntary willingness to obey these restrictions, yet the intrusive nature of these measures may lead some people to believe that authorities are overstepping the limits of their rightful power (i.e. bounded-authority). This paper applies the bounded-authority framework to the COVID-19 context to understand the factors associated with the public's duty to obey authorities during COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilizes survey data from 1,582 individuals to examine what factors drive COVID-19-related bounded-authority concerns, and in turn, how bounded-authority concerns may impact one's duty to obey authorities during COVID-19.

Findings

Results show that worry about freedom loss, opposition to surveillance tactics, police heavy-handedness and perceptions of procedural injustice from police during the pandemic all drive bounded-authority concerns. Findings also reveal that bounded-authority concerns are associated with reduced duty to obey and mediate the relationship between procedural justice and the duty to obey authorities' enforcement of COVID-19 restrictions.

Originality/value

Findings reveal new evidence about the bounded-authority framework and the public's duty to obey authorities, with implications for the COVID-19 context and beyond.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Eugene E. Mniwasa

This paper aims to examine the authorities tasked to fight against money laundering in Tanzania and appraise the efficacy of the country’s anti-money institutional…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the authorities tasked to fight against money laundering in Tanzania and appraise the efficacy of the country’s anti-money institutional framework to tackle the problem.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a qualitative research and data generated from the analysis of documentary materials. It surveys the anti-money laundering (AML) law in Tanzania to describe the legal and institutional frameworks for tackling money laundering. It explores law-related and non-law aspects to interrogate and appraise the efficacy of Tanzania’s AML law and authorities. The qualitative data were generated using the thematic content analysis technique.

Findings

The law in Tanzania establishes authorities and vests them with powers to combat money laundering. The authorities, which are part of Tanzania’s AML institutional framework, have been instrumental in combating money laundering. Nevertheless, several law-related and non-law factors emasculate the efficacy of the AML law and authorities in Tanzania. Some political and economic factors wear off the effectiveness of the country’s AML institutional framework. The transnational nature and complexity of money laundering overwhelm the capacity of the AML authorities in Tanzania.

Practical implications

The paper provides useful insights on money laundering and the legal regime to counteract the scourge in Tanzania which sets up the country’s AML institutional framework. It raises some issues for researchers, policymakers and law enforcers who can re-examine the problem and revisit the law and re-evaluate authorities and propose measures that will enable the government to reinforce the country’s AML regime. The paper makes a case for the government to implement the reforms of the country’s AML policy, legal and institutional frameworks.

Originality/value

The paper investigates issues relating to money laundering and its control in Tanzania beyond the legal perspective to uncover limitations and challenges that emasculate the efficacy of the AML authorities in the Tanzanian context. The issues examined in this paper are not unique to Tanzania and, hence, have relevance to other jurisdictions in sub-Saharan Africa.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Fernanda Mata, Pedro S.R. Martins, Julia B. Lopes-Silva, Marcela Mansur-Alves, Alexander Saeri, Emily Grundy, Peter Slattery and Liam Smith

This study aimed to examine (1) whether confidence in political and health authorities predicted intention to adopt recommended health-protective behaviours and (2…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to examine (1) whether confidence in political and health authorities predicted intention to adopt recommended health-protective behaviours and (2) whether age, gender and education level moderated the relationship between confidence in political and health authorities and health protective-behaviours (download the COVIDSafe app, wear a face mask and stay at home).

Design/methodology/approach

This study assessed 1,206 Australians using an online survey. Participants answered questions regarding their confidence in political and health authorities and intention to adopt health-protective measures.

Findings

Confidence in health and political authorities predicted intention to stay home and intention to download the COVIDSafe app, but not to wear a face mask in public spaces. Age moderated the relationship between confidence in authorities and intention to stay home (i.e. among respondents with less than 54 years old, confidence in authorities was associated with higher intention to stay home). Further, age and education level moderated the relationship between confidence in authorities and intention to download the COVIDSafe app (i.e. among older respondents and those with a university degree or higher, confidence in authorities was more strongly associated with higher intention to download the COVIDSafe app). The interaction between confidence and education predicted adoption of mask-wearing (i.e. among participants with a university degree or higher, more confidence in authorities was associated with higher intention to wear a mask in public spaces).

Originality/value

Our findings can inform the development of targeted communications to increase health-protective behaviours at early stages of future pandemics.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 41 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

Andy Asquith

This paper deals with the management of complex environmental turbulence and organizational change in English local government. Research has been conducted to assess the…

Abstract

This paper deals with the management of complex environmental turbulence and organizational change in English local government. Research has been conducted to assess the perceptions of the strategic élites, chief executives and chief officers, to these change processes. However, no work had been undertaken to assess the extent of support and ownership amongst non‐élite actors, the middle managers and street‐level operatives, in English local authorities towards these élite change strategies. This paper identifies that different management styles do impact upon the roles of these non‐élites in a number of distinct ways. It provides evidence that one of the management styles is more appropriate than the others identified in the paper in terms of effecting successful change management.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2018

Thomas Spencer, Jo Hayden, Peter Murphy and Russ Glennon

The purpose of this paper is to examine the form, content and reporting arrangements of “statements of assurance” required from Fire and Rescue Authorities in England…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the form, content and reporting arrangements of “statements of assurance” required from Fire and Rescue Authorities in England since their introduction in 2012 and identify potential improvements for future implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-method approach was adopted which commenced with an analysis of the current official guidance, an exploration of the accessibility and structure of the current statements produced; followed by a review of those statements through a desk based analysis complemented by a series of elite interviews.

Findings

The current guidance was found to be too broad and open to interpretation to be fit for purpose. This has led to some significant variations in reporting, limiting the statements’ usefulness to key users and stakeholders. Most authorities provided some form of report on their website but inconsistencies in respect of length, structure, name and content, limit their value. The research found that 30 per cent of authorities did not have an up to date statement available online. These findings were supported by the series of interviews. The result has led to confusion amongst authorities as to the statement’s role and the risk of it being perceived as a “box ticking” exercise rather than a real contribution to public assurance.

Practical implications

This paper provides potential lessons which could be adopted to inform future guidance in respect of the preparation and publication of the statement of assurance and its role within the wider public assurance regime for fire and rescue authorities. If adopted, these would improve the accountability, transparency and public assurance of Fire and Rescue Authorities which is a key objective of their governance arrangements.

Originality/value

The statement of assurance has only been a requirement of authorities since the current National Framework for Fire and Rescue was published in July 2012 and has not been subject to independent research since its inception. The government have recently issued a consultation on a new national framework, but this proposes changes to the statements of assurance. The findings will therefore be of value to the government, the fire and rescue sector and the recently appointed regulators for the service Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire and Rescue Services.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Annika Schneider and Grant Samkin

The purpose of this paper is to assess the extent and quality of intellectual capital disclosures (ICDs) in the annual reports of the New Zealand local government sector.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the extent and quality of intellectual capital disclosures (ICDs) in the annual reports of the New Zealand local government sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper makes use of an ICD index constructed through a participatory stakeholder consultation process to develop a disclosure index which measures the extent and quality intellectual capital reporting in the 2004/2005 annual reports of 82 local government authorities in New Zealand. The final index comprised 26 items divided into three categories: internal, external and human capital.

Findings

The results indicate that the reporting of intellectual capital by local government authorities is varied. The most reported items were joint ventures/business collaborations and management processes, while the least reported items were intellectual property and licensing agreements. The most reported category of intellectual capital was internal capital, followed by external capital. Human capital was the least reported category.

Research limitations/implications

There are a number of limitations associated with this study. First the research covered only one year (2004/2005) which makes it difficult to draw any trend conclusions. Second, differing legal reporting requirements may make it difficult to compare findings of this research with findings of research conducted in other jurisdictions. The final limitation of this study is its exploratory nature of this research and the use of a disclosure index to measure disclosure levels.

Practical implications

The results in this paper indicate that local authorities are disclosing some aspects of intellectual capital in their annual reports. However, there is no consistent reporting framework and many areas of ICDs do not meet stakeholder expectations.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in that it is the first study to make use of an ICD index to examine intellectual capital reporting by local government authorities.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Annika Schneider, Grant Samkin and Howard Davey

The purpose of this paper is to establish whether local authorities in New Zealand report biodiversity-related information and to examine the vehicles through which it is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish whether local authorities in New Zealand report biodiversity-related information and to examine the vehicles through which it is communicated.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a keyword search to identify biodiversity reporting across a wide range of data sources, including local authority websites, formal accountability documents, environmental reports, environment and biodiversity management strategies, plans and policies.

Findings

Biodiversity-related information was contained in range of documents. Reporting ranged from no mention of the term in existing statutory accountability documents (Annual Plans, Annual Reports, Long-Term Plans [LTPs] and District Plans/Regional Policy Statements), through to a comprehensive stand-alone biodiversity Annual Report and stand-alone biodiversity strategies. Regional and unitary authorities were more likely than territorial authorities to prepare and report biodiversity-related information to stakeholders. There is currently no consistent framework or method to guide local authorities in the presentation of biodiversity-related information. The lack of consistent, comparable information hinders the ability of stakeholders to assess local authority performance in the sustainable management of biodiversity in their district or region.

Research limitations/implications

While this study does not consider quality of reporting, or reporting trends over time, it provides a picture of the “current state of play”. This provides a starting point from which further research into the preparation and reporting of biodiversity information by local authorities can be conducted.

Originality/value

This paper represents the first of its kind within a New Zealand context. It provides an initial insight into whether local authorities prepare and report biodiversity-related information and where this information is presented.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Caroline De Almeida

Says that, in recent years, public libraries have undergone budget cuts which have affected the services they provide. Shows these cuts have caused the public library…

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Abstract

Says that, in recent years, public libraries have undergone budget cuts which have affected the services they provide. Shows these cuts have caused the public library service to be thrown into a financial crisis. Contributing to this crisis are local government restructuring with no additional money allocated for the transitionary period and also public libraries ineligibility to compete for national lottery funding. Discusses the standards a public library should have as well as government legislation affecting libraries, especially with regard to lack of funding. Includes two case studies of public libraries in different areas to show the differences in how different types of authority are affected.

Details

New Library World, vol. 98 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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