Search results

1 – 10 of over 28000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 October 2021

Michelle Striepe and Christine Cunningham

This paper presents a review of empirical research on educational leadership during times of crises in K–12 schools. This review aimed to map the recent literature and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents a review of empirical research on educational leadership during times of crises in K–12 schools. This review aimed to map the recent literature and identify key characteristics of educational leadership during crises to understand how this type of leadership is different from current understandings.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review of empirical research from 2010 to 2020 on how school leaders have managed and responded to crises in K-12 was completed. The empirical research was analysed and synthesised by using the preview, question, read and summarise (PQRS) system.

Findings

The findings draw attention to the fact that the notion of crisis leadership has been a neglected aspect of educational leadership research. Additionally, the review reveals six emerging characteristics which depict how school leadership has been enacted during different types of crisis across a range of contexts and crisis phases.

Originality/value

The findings add to current practical understandings of educational leadership by illustrating the complexity and multi-layered nature of leading during times of crisis. Furthermore, these findings contribute to the field by identifying how leading during a crisis is different from current understandings. Lastly, they highlight the need to develop theories and models that account for how leadership is used to deal with the unpredictable nature of crises that schools across the globe face today and into the future.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Ariful Islam, Nur Fadiah Mohd Zawawi and Sazali Abd Wahab

For Bangladeshi small and medium enterprises (SMEs), the COVID-19 economic shock is remarkable in both its complexity and intensity. SMEs need systemic inspiration to…

Abstract

Purpose

For Bangladeshi small and medium enterprises (SMEs), the COVID-19 economic shock is remarkable in both its complexity and intensity. SMEs need systemic inspiration to solve the crisis, aligned with a moral and authentic approach that serves both the leader and the follower’s interests. This study aims to conceptualize the innovation-focused success method of SMEs before and after the pandemic to manage the crisis by establishing spiritual leadership based on Islamic perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

To discuss the impact of spiritual leadership on innovation-focused SME performance configuration through the lens of a crisis, a comprehensive literature study has been carried out in which over 360 articles are read and reviewed by the authors. It has also established the reliability and validity of literature analysis. Also, a qualitative investigation has been used to support the direction of the study.

Findings

For a subsequent process of scientific deployment and evaluation of its execution, a new applied strategic innovation-focused SME success configuration through spiritual leadership development is made available. The primary value of this paradigm is the potential to calculate and treat the aspects of spiritual leadership obtained from Islamic ideas.

Research limitations/implications

Prior analytical or empirical attempts from multiple viewpoints are subsequently needed to inquire about the proposed conceptualization.

Practical implications

Among the realistic consequences of this analysis is that while a number of leadership paradigms have been embraced by a broad body of leadership studies, the findings indicate that this paper should pay heed to the influential spiritual style of leadership, taking into account Islamic perspectives on the context of crisis. Therefore, Bangladeshi SMEs need to develop and run leadership training programs focused on the Islamic viewpoint of spirituality to encourage the actions of leaders during and after crises.

Social implications

The legal and moral values of the society would ultimately be upgraded from this conceptualization. Moreover, less corruption in corporate activities would improve the economic prosperity of a nation. It would also contribute to the cross-cultural portrayal of the positive picture of Islam.

Originality/value

This holistic conceptualization describes the mediating role of strategic innovation practices based on theoretical foundations, which have seldom been done in previous research, between the Islamic model of spiritual leadership and SME success during and after a crisis.

Details

PSU Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2020

Maria Fors Brandebo

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to increased knowledge of destructive leadership in crisis management. The specific research questions are: (1) What types of…

Downloads
2570

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to increased knowledge of destructive leadership in crisis management. The specific research questions are: (1) What types of destructive leadership behaviours can be identified in leaders in crisis management? and (2) Why are these behaviours considered destructive in this context?

Design/methodology/approach

About 21 informants involved in crisis management at regional, local and operational levels in Sweden were interviewed. They were selected since they had recently been involved in severe accidents and/or crises (e.g. terror attacks, forest fires). A grounded theory analysis of interview data yielded two core variables: destructive leadership behaviours, and appraisal: interpretation of leader behaviour.

Findings

The study identified seven different destructive leadership behaviours: four task-related and three relationship-related. Task-related behaviours primarily led to negative consequences for the task/crisis. Relationship-related behaviours have negative consequences for subordinates' job satisfaction, well-being and/or sense of meaningfulness. The paper relates the identified behaviours to existing leadership ideals within crisis management and discusses behaviours that appear to be unique for the crisis management context.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the fact that great crisis managers are not always good at managing relationships, which may have negative implications for crisis management in the long term.

Originality/value

Destructive leadership is a research field that is rapidly expanding. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the nature of destructive leadership behaviours and what makes an individual appraise a leader as destructive in crisis management.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2019

Malarvizhi Hirudayaraj and Torrence E. Sparkman

Disruption due to a crisis or disaster is a constant threat for the tourism industry, unfortunately the frameworks designed to prepare leaders for these events are…

Downloads
1526

Abstract

Purpose

Disruption due to a crisis or disaster is a constant threat for the tourism industry, unfortunately the frameworks designed to prepare leaders for these events are inadequate. Most frameworks are designed to assess and enhance resilience and recovery and minimally prepare leaders for the complexities that emerge before, during and after these events. The purpose of this paper is to offer a leadership development framework that integrates context, competence and a complexity mindset.

Design/methodology/approach

This general review examines the literature focused on crises and disasters in the tourism industry for the purpose of understanding the circumstances surrounding several kinds of disruptive events, the competencies needed to address them. It also explores the usefulness of three forms of leadership development inputs. The result is a framework that builds capacity while ensuring organizational alignment.

Findings

The preparation of tourism industry leaders who address implications of crises and disaster should involve an understanding of the crisis processes and factors that can be known, and the development of a mindset that allows the leader to address those factors which cannot be known beforehand.

Originality/value

This paper offers a framework for tourism leaders and developers that moves beyond static and linear approaches to crisis and disaster training. It encourages the acquisition of contextual knowledge and adaptive processes through leadership-focused education, exposure to leaders and experiences.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Arlene Haddon, Catherine Loughlin and Corinne McNally

– The purpose of this paper is to gain a nuanced understanding of what employees want from leaders in an organizational crisis context.

Downloads
3700

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a nuanced understanding of what employees want from leaders in an organizational crisis context.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a mixed methods approach to explore employee leadership preferences during organizational crisis and non-crisis times using the Multi Factor Leadership Questionnaire (Avolio and Bass, 2004), and qualitative interviews. The authors also investigate sex roles using the Bem Sex Role Inventory (Bem, 1981).

Findings

The mixed method approach reveals some potential limitations in how leadership is typically measured. The qualitative findings highlight employees’ expectations of leaders to take action quickly while simultaneously engaging in continuous communication with employees during crisis. None of the components of transformational leadership encapsulate this notion.

Originality/value

The mixed methods approach is novel in the crisis leadership literature. Had the authors relied solely on the quantitative measures, the importance of continuous communication during crisis would not have been apparent. As a result of this approach, the findings suggest that widely used and accepted measures of leadership may not adequately capture leadership in a crisis context. This is timely as it aligns with current literature which questions the way this construct is operationalized (Van Knippenberg and Sitkin, 2013).

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 March 2021

Jaimee Felice Caringal-Go, Mendiola Teng-Calleja, Edna P. Franco, Jason O. Manaois and Rae Mark S. Zantua

The purpose of the paper is to identify traits and behaviors of organization leaders that were deemed helpful by employees during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Downloads
1076

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to identify traits and behaviors of organization leaders that were deemed helpful by employees during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an exploratory qualitative study that utilized online surveys. Data from 155 participants were subjected to content analysis.

Findings

Several interrelated traits and behaviors of effective crisis leadership were identified. These were clustered into three superordinate themes – attending to the person, taking charge and showing the way forward and sustaining the spirit.

Research limitations/implications

Findings from this paper can be furthered by conducting quantitative studies to validate themes and/or test a conceptual model of effective crisis leadership. Gathering data from other populations at different points in time during the COVID-19 pandemic may also be useful.

Practical implications

A review of leadership development programs and organization norms and values is recommended in order to ensure that they are consistent with crisis leadership competencies.

Originality/value

This paper helps address the gap on follower-centered perspectives about organizational leadership responses to crises and highlights the importance of care and compassion in leading employees during difficult times.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Paul Pounder

The purpose of this paper is to explore responsible leadership and crisis management. Many sectors and economies have faced the stark effect of coronavirus; however, the…

Downloads
1497

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore responsible leadership and crisis management. Many sectors and economies have faced the stark effect of coronavirus; however, the damage done was felt more in some areas than others. Cruise tourism is one such sector dramatically affected, as it ground to a screeching halt in March 2020. This has led to crisis management, as passengers, cruise-line crew, large cruise companies and governments were now faced with a new reality as countries around the world closed their borders. This article aims at discussing in detail how responsible leadership, in the small island of Barbados, championed a response to support the cruise tourism sector and assist in managing the crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The author conducted a literature review on the current knowledge relating leadership and crisis management. Thus building a better understanding in the field and identifying gaps for making new arguments for best practices of leadership development in crisis management established in the cruise tourism sector. The author gave viewpoints based on the leadership style of the Prime Minister of Barbados.

Findings

Responsible leadership is a style that has been best observed as one that emphasizes a commitment to the common good and provides a constructive societal impact. With this approach, the leaders navigated the uncertainty surrounding the crisis and provided fresh hope to future plans. Thus, the coronavirus was perceived in a positive way, producing opportunities for progress and change.

Research limitations/implications

By developing an understanding of traditional leadership theories, it provides a framework for the adaptation of responsible leadership approach in crisis management. Moreover, the practice of responsible leadership in this COVID-19 era is shown to be crucial to crisis management and enhancing performance. Limitations on viewpoint are based on the author's philosophies.

Practical implications

This paper provides a better understanding of the principles surrounding leadership and fashions a framework for discussing responsible leadership from a crisis management standpoint. The viewpoint provides an optimistic difference in managing a crisis.

Social implications

The paper provides a better understanding of responsible leadership as an integrated approach to governance, ethics and social responsibility. The paper provides a basis to assess the intersection of the literature on leadership and crisis management.

Originality/value

This article contributes to the literature on responsible leadership within the context of crisis management.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Zachary Sheaffer, Ronit Bogler and Samuel Sarfaty

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which leadership attributes, masculinity, risk taking and decision making affect perceived crisis proneness.

Downloads
3751

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which leadership attributes, masculinity, risk taking and decision making affect perceived crisis proneness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws mainly on the literature about gender, leadership and organizational crisis to explore whether masculinity predicts crisis proneness, and the extent to which leadership attributes as well as risk‐taking and decision‐making style are efficient predictors of perceived crisis preparedness (CP). Utilizing pertinent literature and concepts, the paper evaluates a database of 231 female and male managers.

Findings

As hypothesized, masculinity is positively associated, whereas transformational leadership is inversely associated with perceived crisis proneness. Both participative decision making and passive management predict higher degree of perceived crisis proneness and so does risk taking.

Research limitations/implications

More in‐depth research as well as larger and more diverse sample is required to explore more definitively why and how masculinity is positively associated with crisis proneness.

Practical implications

The paper provides preliminary evidence regarding the merits of feminine leadership traits as facilitators of CP This finding does not, however, preclude the usefulness of masculine attributes in managing actual organizational crises. The findings appear particularly relevant given the current turbulent business environments and the increasing frequency and magnitude of corporate crises.

Originality/value

The paper synthesizes evidence on CP proneness and gender, and the evidence of feminine attributes as an important antidote to perceived crisis proneness. The paper outlines reasons for this phenomenon and implications for placement of managers in current business arenas.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Raka M. Bhaduri

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship of organizational culture, leadership and crisis management through exploration of these three constructs with…

Downloads
5065

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship of organizational culture, leadership and crisis management through exploration of these three constructs with respect to crisis management.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a conceptual framework has been proposed that is based on the literature findings of organizational culture, leadership and crisis management. Two types of cultural elements are used; internal versus external focus and low versus high flexibility. Organizational crisis management process is explained through the five-stage life cycle, including signal detection, prevention, damage containment, recovery and learning. Four types of leadership are included; directive, transactional, cognitive and transformational that are critical during crisis management. Five research propositions have been proposed for each stage of crisis management.

Findings

Five research propositions have been proposed based on the stages of crisis management.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual framework needs to be tested for validity. More research is needed on how changing demographics and technology affect these constructs. Organizations need to develop through reflective practices that focus on leadership competencies and crisis-prone culture to tackle any crisis event.

Practical implications

Organizations need to develop leadership competencies and crisis-prone culture. Organizations needs to be reflective on their practices.

Originality/value

The proposed conceptual framework is an expanded version of the crisis response leadership matrix (CRLM) model of Bowers et al. (2017). In this paper, an unique concept is presented by aligning leadership, culture and crisis management with respect to each stage of crisis management and types of crisis.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 43 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Ethlyn Williams, Juanita M. Woods, Attila Hertelendy and Kathryn Kloepfer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of leader potential in an extreme context – it develops and tests a model that describes how subordinate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of leader potential in an extreme context – it develops and tests a model that describes how subordinate perceptions of individual-focused transformational leadership, subordinate trust in the leader and subordinate identification with the team influence supervisory evaluations of subordinate crisis leader potential.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were administered to emergency services personnel and their supervisors working in a large fire rescue organization in the Southeastern USA. Survey responses were analyzed using hierarchical regression.

Findings

Results support the theoretical model – subordinates reporting high levels of trust in their transformational leader were evaluated by their supervisors as having stronger potential to become crisis leaders. Lower levels of subordinate identification with the team strengthened the transformational leadership to trust association and the indirect effect of perceived transformational leadership on supervisory evaluations of subordinate crisis leader potential (through subordinate trust in the leader).

Practical implications

Supervisors who are viewed as transformational and fostering trusting relationships by subordinates are more likely to evaluate subordinates as having the potential to lead in crisis situations. In an extreme context within an organization facing change, subordinates who identify less with their team might build a more trusting relationship with a leader who is perceived as demonstrating transformational behaviors.

Social implications

Subordinate focus on the leader appears to enhance supervisory evaluations of subordinate potential (for leader development) in the study. Individual-level rewards for employees that involve competition might counter efforts toward shared mental models and remain the greatest challenge in the public emergency services setting.

Originality/value

Evaluating leader development, in terms of crisis leader potential, in an extreme context using a process model – to understand the interplay of individual-focused transformational leadership and trust given the moderating effect of team identification – is a key strength of the current study.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 28000