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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2023

Paige Sable, Fengyan Tang, Jenifer A. Swab, Sheila Roth and Daniel Rosen

This study focuses on Emergency Medical Service (EMS) personnel and examines the impact of overdose calls for opioids and attitudes of EMS workers towards individuals with…

Abstract

Purpose

This study focuses on Emergency Medical Service (EMS) personnel and examines the impact of overdose calls for opioids and attitudes of EMS workers towards individuals with substance use disorders on EMS workers' mental well-being while accounting for self-reported sleep and social support.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study surveyed EMS workers (N = 608) across Pennsylvania on demographic variables, frequency of overdose calls, attitudes towards opioid use and naloxone administration on measures of mental health. Multiple logistic regression models were estimated to examine the relationship of perception of opioid use and treatment and likelihood that EMS workers might experience depression.

Findings

Authors found two main findings: (1) There was a significant relationship between more negative perceptions about opioid use/naloxone and the likelihood that EMS workers might experience depression. (2) There was a significant relationship between number of overdose calls EMS workers responded to and likelihood of depression, which appeared to be alleviated by improvements in sleep and social support.

Research limitations/implications

There is potential opportunity for EMS employers to minimize the impact of the opioid epidemic on EMS worker mental health. Trainings to highlight effectiveness of treatment should be further explored, along with ways to enhance social support and improve sleep for EMS workers to protect against the stress associated with responding to this public health crisis.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literature on the impact of the opioid epidemic as it relates to mental health outcomes for EMS professionals providing frontline care to those experiencing opioid use disorders.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2022

Corinne A. Beaugard, Valerie Hruschak, Christina S. Lee, Jenifer Swab, Sheila Roth and Daniel Rosen

Emergency medical service (EMS) workers are at risk for burnout related to the opioid overdose crisis because they are frequently present during overdose events. The study’s aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Emergency medical service (EMS) workers are at risk for burnout related to the opioid overdose crisis because they are frequently present during overdose events. The study’s aims were twofold: 1) to determine whether variables related to the opioid crisis were associated with burnout and 2) to explore the relationship between mental health, sleep, substance use, social support, and attitudes about working during the opioid overdose crisis with burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

In a cross-sectional web-based study, surveys were distributed by supervisors to EMS workers in Pennsylvania (winter 2018). Participants (n = 214) completed measures on burnout, social support, mental health, substance use, and sleep quality and reported their frequency of naloxone administration and their attitudes about working during the opioid overdose crisis. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were run to determine correlates of burnout.

Findings

The sample was 65.4% male, 91.5% white, and 43% were between 36–55 years old. In the regression model (n = 177), depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), sleep, attitudes about working during the opioid crisis, cannabis use, social support, age, hours worked each week, and frequency of naloxone administration were significantly correlated with burnout.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the emergent literature on burnout and EMS professionals during the opioid overdose crisis by finding that attitudes about working during the opioid overdose crisis are correlated with burnout. While the relationship should be explored in future research, the authors believe that interventions to prevent EMS burnout could incorporate training to improve attitudes about supporting individuals during overdose events.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 November 2023

Paresh Wankhade

153

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 May 2023

Paresh Wankhade

110

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2013

Christine M. Proulx, Teresa M. Cooney, Jacqueline J. Benson and Linley A. Snyder-Rivas

Family members provide the bulk of care to persons in later life, representing the vast majority of caregivers. However, studies confirm that men with a history of divorce are…

Abstract

Family members provide the bulk of care to persons in later life, representing the vast majority of caregivers. However, studies confirm that men with a history of divorce are less likely than married men to view family members as potential caregivers. This chapter presents findings from a qualitative study on the experiences of 21 ex-wives who chose to provide mostly end-of-life care to their ex-husbands in mid- and late-life. We examine questions about the situational and motivating factors behind ex-wife caregivers’ decisions, and provide, as background, findings about their pre- and post-divorce relationships. Relational outcomes of the caregiving situation also are considered. Several themes emerge, including patterns of proximity and continued contact post-divorce, despite often chaotic former marital relationships; a desire to spare children from the burdens of care; and an opportunity to renew communication or connections with family through the process of caregiving. Implications of our findings include the need to acknowledge ex-spouses as potential caregivers and better understand the enduring bonds between ex-spouses.

Details

Visions of the 21st Century Family: Transforming Structures and Identities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-028-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Ronald K. Klimberg, Kenneth D. Lawrence and Sheila M. Lawrence

This chapter concerns itself with the development of a regression model for determining the executive compensation of the AT&T CEO. The data observations for this model consist of…

Abstract

This chapter concerns itself with the development of a regression model for determining the executive compensation of the AT&T CEO. The data observations for this model consist of a list of 21 comparable companies selected by the compensation committee of AT&T, its institutional investors, and AT&T advisors. A set of 24 financial variables for each of the companies is compiled as the data source for the regression model.

Details

Advances in Business and Management Forecasting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-290-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2021

Kenneth D. Lawrence and Sheila M. Lawrence

This chapter concerns itself with the development of a regression model for an executive compensation forecasting of the top-level executives of MetLife. The data observations…

Abstract

This chapter concerns itself with the development of a regression model for an executive compensation forecasting of the top-level executives of MetLife. The data observations consist of a list of 12 comparable corporations selected from comparable financial institutions. A set of 28 financial variables from each of the corporations is compiled as the data source of this regression model.

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Sheila Dolores Arnold

This chapter offers professional advice for educators, particularly those unfamiliar with history-based performance, on how to move their historic character research to the place…

Abstract

This chapter offers professional advice for educators, particularly those unfamiliar with history-based performance, on how to move their historic character research to the place of actual portrayal. Using a questioning method, the author takes the reader step-by-step through essential elements of historical character portrayal such as character perspective, props, and costuming, placing them within the context of educational objectives and performance logistics. The author discusses in detail differences between portraying a well-known historical figure versus someone connected to that person. She explains the importance of choosing a date for a first-person portrayal, as it defines what the character “knows,” and provides techniques for handling questions beyond the character's date range. For newcomers to researching and portraying historical figures, it is important to consider the following points: What is each character teaching? Where will the presentation be held? Is the presentation solely for students, or does it include peers, parents, or administrators? This chapter addresses these critical questions along with research techniques, performance methods, and practical suggestions for obtaining costumes and props. In addition, the author discusses presentation skills required for an effective presentation, such as voice, mood, and movement. She provides examples from her own professional repertoire showing how techniques such as pace level and articulation work effectively in front of an audience and breaks down the structure of a 20- to 45-minute presentation. The author gives examples of how to be prepared for audience questions and unexpected interruptions during a performance. Finally, she explains the importance of the “story” in historic character presentations to enhance its teaching and presentation effectiveness.

Details

Living History in the Classroom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-596-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Lisa L. Heuvel

This chapter presents performance pedagogy as an interdisciplinary construct and potential bridge between history-based performance and classroom teaching. This chapter proposes…

Abstract

This chapter presents performance pedagogy as an interdisciplinary construct and potential bridge between history-based performance and classroom teaching. This chapter proposes Living History in the Classroom: Performance and Pedagogy's central theme: that storytelling and historical interpretation are effective teaching tools. These techniques are integral at many public history settings for on-site and outreach education; Freeman Tilden's foundational 1957 interpretive guidelines for America's national parks paired engagement with education and still influence the public history field. Yet, a review of related literature suggests that limited attention has been paid to translating these techniques for educators' use, whether as performers, as mentors for their students, or in collaborating with historic sites. The pedagogy inherent in storytelling and interpretive performance aligns with their potential instructional value, as has been documented for educator's performance pedagogy in the arts. Similarly, the continuing need to engage current and new audiences impacts how these organizations conduct educational programs and visitor attractions. In the same respect, PK-16 educators and administrators consistently seek best practices for engaging today's Generation Z students (born between 1997 and 2012) and the generation that follows, termed Generation Alpha (McCrindle, 2020). This chapter features a performance pedagogy model that combines historical and instructional objectives that draw from research and observation of first-person interpreters performing in teacher professional development workshops and the author's personal instructional and interpretive experience. This chapter contains a related interview with a noted historian-performer and for educators' use, a worksheet with guiding questions to create or analyze a historical character, educational content, related pedagogy, and key aspects of a performance.

Details

Living History in the Classroom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-596-3

Keywords

1 – 10 of 42