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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Dan Robotham

This paper aims to outline the literature that situates sleep as a public health concern. In particular, it discusses the bi‐directional relationship between insomnia and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline the literature that situates sleep as a public health concern. In particular, it discusses the bi‐directional relationship between insomnia and mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews and presents the findings of other relevant research, relating the discussion to policy and practice.

Findings

Getting good quality sleep is essential, but insomnia is a huge problem and may be the most commonly reported mental health complaint in the UK. Mental health influences insomnia, and insomnia can lead to mental health problems. Sleep medication is a commonly prescribed treatment for insomnia, but evidence from robust research suggests that cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBTI) is the most successful treatment for chronic insomnia.

Practical implications

GPs need evidence‐based information on the importance and benefits of sleep and to be able to recognise sleep problems in primary care. CBTI needs to be represented in NICE guidance for insomnia. CBT‐influenced methods could be implemented as low level interventions as part of a stepped care framework.

Originality/value

Reviewing the academic literature on sleep problems related to mental health reinforces the importance of sleep as a health issue, which can be assessed in primary care as appropriate.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Alex Dregan, Tea Lallukka and David Armstrong

Typologies of sleep problems have usually relied on identifying underlying causes or symptom clusters. The purpose of this paper is to explore the value of using the…

Abstract

Purpose

Typologies of sleep problems have usually relied on identifying underlying causes or symptom clusters. The purpose of this paper is to explore the value of using the patient's own reasons for sleep disturbance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using secondary data analysis of a nationally representative psychiatric survey the patterning of the various reasons respondents provided for self‐reported sleep problems were examined. Over two thirds (69.3 per cent) of respondents could identify a specific reason for their sleep problem with worry (37.9 per cent) and illness (20.1 per cent) representing the most commonly reported reasons. And while women reported more sleep problems for almost every reason compared with men, the patterning of reasons by age showed marked variability. Sleep problem symptoms such as difficulty getting to sleep or waking early also showed variability by different reasons, as did the association with major correlates such as worry, depression, anxiety and poor health.

Findings

While prevalence surveys of “insomnia” or “poor sleep” often assume the identification of an underlying homogeneous construct, there may be grounds for recognising the existence of different sleep problem types, particularly in the context of the patient's perceived reason for the problem.

Originality/value

A typology based on reasons presents a different snapshot of the landscape of insomnia. Using patient's reasons to underpin a sleep nosology is an alternative way of sub‐dividing patients' symptoms which has some face validity given the “subjective” associations between reasons and symptoms.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Sue Holttum

The purpose of this paper is to discuss recent papers on trauma, sleep and psychotic experiences to highlight the lack of attention given to sleep.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss recent papers on trauma, sleep and psychotic experiences to highlight the lack of attention given to sleep.

Design/methodology/approach

A search was carried out to find recent papers on psychosis or schizophrenia, trauma and sleep.

Findings

Papers tended to focus on trauma and psychosis, or on sleep and psychosis, but not on trauma, sleep and psychosis. The two papers discussed in most detail here focussed on sleep difficulties from either a service user or professional perspective. Both concluded that sleep difficulties need more attention. The author also discussed evidence suggesting that stress and trauma cause sleep difficulties and that these, in turn, are an important cause of psychotic experiences. Severe or prolonged stress may also directly cause some psychotic experiences.

Originality/value

The two main papers highlight for the first time in detail service users’ own experiences of sleep difficulties, and how mental health professionals view them, suggesting more help is needed. Other papers suggest that sleep is overlooked in research into the causes of psychosis. There is growing evidence that people have sleep problems before psychotic experiences, and that many have experienced severe or prolonged stress due to life events and circumstances, often in childhood. Given that stress can interfere with sleep, it is time to investigate further the role of stress and sleep in the development and maintenance of psychosis.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2016

Christin Mellner, Göran Kecklund, Michiel Kompier, Amir Sariaslan and Gunnar Aronsson

Employees have gained increased flexibility in organizing their work in time and space, that is boundaryless work. Managing the boundaries between work and personal life…

Abstract

Employees have gained increased flexibility in organizing their work in time and space, that is boundaryless work. Managing the boundaries between work and personal life would seem to be crucial if one is to psychologically detach from work during leisure in order to unwind and get sufficient sleep. Drawing from a sample of Swedish professional workers (N = 3,846), a theoretical model was proposed testing the inter-relationships between boundaryless work in time and space, weekly work hours, psychological detachment, sleeping problems and sleep duration using a structural equation modelling (SEM) analysis. Findings showed that working boundlessly in time, that is spread out during the working day and week, was directly associated with both long weekly work hours and lack of psychological detachment. In contrast, working boundlessly in space, that is at several different places, was inversely associated with weekly work hours and had no association with psychological detachment. Psychological detachment, in turn, was directly associated with sleeping problems and inversely associated with sleep duration. Sleeping problems were inversely associated with sleep duration. Employees with long weekly work hours had a low degree of sleeping problems. There was also no association between long weekly work hours and sleep duration. These findings contradict earlier research, however, we interpret these findings as that if one works a great deal but is able to mentally detach from work-related feelings and thoughts during free time, then sleep will not be hampered because perseverative cognitions associated with prolonged biological activation will have been interrupted. As such, psychological detachment can be regarded as the mechanism that mediates the relationships between working ‘anytime’ and long weekly work hours, and sleep. It was concluded working boundlessly in time increases the likelihood for long weekly work hours and lack of psychological detachment. Hence, employees working ‘anytime – all the time’ run the risk of ‘always being on’ resulting in disturbed sleep.

Details

New Ways of Working Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-303-7

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Elaine S. Barry

Throughout human history and around the world, co-sleeping was the context for human evolutionary development. Currently, most of the world’s peoples continue to practice…

Abstract

Throughout human history and around the world, co-sleeping was the context for human evolutionary development. Currently, most of the world’s peoples continue to practice co-sleeping with infants, but there is increasing pressure on families in the West not to co-sleep. Research from anthropology, family studies, medicine, pediatrics, psychology, and public health is reviewed through the lens of a developmental theory to place co-sleeping within a developmental, theoretical context for understanding it. Viewing co-sleeping as a family choice and a normative, human developmental context changes how experts may provide advice and support to families choosing co-sleeping, especially in families making the transition to parenthood. During this transition, many decisions are made by parents “intuitively” (Ball, Hooker, & Kelly, 1999), making understanding the developmental consequences of some of those choices even more important. In Western culture, families are making “intuitive” decisions that research has shown to be beneficial, but families are not receiving complete messages about benefits and risks of co-sleeping. Co-sleeping can be an important choice for families as they make the life-changing transition to parenthood, if individualized messages about safe infant sleep practices (directed toward their individual family circumstances) are shared with them.

Details

Transitions into Parenthood: Examining the Complexities of Childrearing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-222-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Torbjörn Åkerstedt, Peter M. Nilsson and Göran Kecklund

This chapter summarizes the knowledge on sleep and restitution. Sleep constitutes the recuperative process of the central nervous system. The use of the brain during…

Abstract

This chapter summarizes the knowledge on sleep and restitution. Sleep constitutes the recuperative process of the central nervous system. The use of the brain during wakefulness will lead to depletion of energy in the cortical areas locally responsible for activity. The level of depletion is monitored and sleep is initiated when critical levels are reached. The attempts to initiate sleep are perceived as sleepiness or fatigue. The ensuing sleep then actively restores brain physiology to normal levels. This also results in restored alertness, memory capacity, and mood. Also, peripheral anabolic processes (secretion of growth hormone and testosterone) are strongly enhanced and catabolic process (secretion of cortisol and catecholamines) are strongly suppressed. In the long run, reduced or impaired sleep leads to metabolic diseases, depression, burnout, and mortality. Stress and irregular hours are among the main causes of disturbed sleep.

Details

Current Perspectives on Job-Stress Recovery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-544-0

Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Antoinette Fage-Butler

Sleep apps installed on smartphones are increasingly being used to help people overcome sleep problems. The purpose of this chapter is to identify the discourses that…

Abstract

Sleep apps installed on smartphones are increasingly being used to help people overcome sleep problems. The purpose of this chapter is to identify the discourses that underpin discursive constructions of the potential sleep app user in sleep app marketing communication. According to critical marketing theory, discursive constructions of the potential consumer in marketing communication promote the potential consumer’s identification and alignment, priming the potential consumer to consider positively the product being marketed. In that sense, marketing (of sleep apps, or indeed anything) is culturally significant, as it provides templates for forms of identity, and affects the meanings and objects that circulate within a culture.

A data set consisting of the promotional material that was used to market acclaimed sleep apps was analysed using Foucauldian discourse analysis (FDA). The following discourses were identified in the data: disempowerment, pathologisation, ignorance, behaviourism, responsibilisation, mindfulness, seduction, convenience or common sense, empowerment and individualisation. These discourses indicate how sleep apps are legitimised as technical appendages to be installed into people’s phones and integrated into their lives. They also underpin the discursive identities that summon potential consumers into alignment. This chapter contributes to our understandings of the discursive mechanisms that lie behind the growing uptake of sleep apps. It also demonstrates the value of combining discourse analysis with relevant critical theory to gain insights into the emerging phenomenon of app culture.

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2022

Mavis Agyemang Opoku, Seung-Wan Kang and Najung Kim

Within the theoretical frameworks of conservation of resources and job demands-resources (JD-R), the study aims to examine how sleep deficit could be negatively related to…

Abstract

Purpose

Within the theoretical frameworks of conservation of resources and job demands-resources (JD-R), the study aims to examine how sleep deficit could be negatively related to creativity at work by depleting critical resources of creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were collected from 368 individuals nested in 40 teams at a call center. The authors conducted multilevel analysis to test the proposed hypotheses to account for the hierarchical nature of the data while simultaneously estimating the effect of predictors at different levels on individual-level outcomes and maintaining the predictors' level of analysis.

Findings

Through the data, the study presents how the depletion of resource, that is, emotional exhaustion, functions as a mediating mechanism that connects sleep deficit to creativity at work. Further, the study presents that higher job demands can worsen the negative effects of resource depletion on creativity at work because they further deplete resources needed for creative behaviors. Specifically, when sleep-deprived, those working in a high-task-interdependence climate are likely to experience emotional exhaustion more severely than do those in a low-task-interdependence climate. Also, the relationship between emotional exhaustion and creativity is more negative for managers than for non-managers because of managers' higher job demands.

Practical implications

By presenting sleep deficit-linked inhibitors of creativity at work, the authors highlight the importance of securing sufficient sleep and affective resources when designing jobs and HR practices in organizations.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the call for attention to examining the mechanisms through which sleep deficit affects employee creative behavior.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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