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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Miguel Gómez

This paper seeks to provide instructional methods for using blackout poetry and primary sources to learn about marginalized voices from history within a social studies…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide instructional methods for using blackout poetry and primary sources to learn about marginalized voices from history within a social studies classroom. Blackout poetry provides students with authentic opportunities to engage in meaningful learning experiences using primary sources and marginalized voices that are both hands-on in nature and promote the use of critical thinking.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper opted to describe an approach to teach students about marginalized voices in history through the use of primary sources and blackout poetry. Step-by-step instruction was provided via an included table so that readers can recreate the lesson in readers' own classrooms.

Findings

This paper offers insights about how blackout poetry can be used to provide students an authentic experience with primary sources and historically marginalized voices. These experiences include opportunities to critically think about the context and significance or these marginalized voices and impact of marginalized voices on history through individual and cooperative learning opportunities.

Practical implications

This paper is designed for teachers to utilize and replicate in teachers' own social studies classrooms.

Social implications

This paper provides teachers with detailed steps on how teachers can amplify traditionally marginalized voices in social studies instruction of teachers.

Originality/value

This paper recognizes the important role that primary sources have in the social studies classroom along with the historically under representative role that marginalized voices have had in the author's social studies classrooms. Through an original approach, using blackout poetry, the author presents a unique perspective on how to teach about historically marginalized voices using primary sources in a manner that supports historical thinking.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 January 2023

An L. Hoang, Anh T.T. Phan, Dam X. Dong, Trang T.H. Tran and Chinh T. Nguyen

The team voice (TV) concept has been largely understudied, with different definitions and understandings among prior research creating confusion for readers and future…

Abstract

Purpose

The team voice (TV) concept has been largely understudied, with different definitions and understandings among prior research creating confusion for readers and future researchers. This study proposes a unified definition and connotation of TV that captures TV's collective meaning and highlights TV's vital role in Eastern contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applied the constructivist grounded theory (CGT) methodology to collect and analyze qualitative data from Vietnam software companies. A total of 32 software development managers and employees were interviewed regarding TV behavior of the managers and employees.

Findings

The findings emphasize that TV should not be understood as team members' average or aggregate voice. Rather, TV should be understood as the shared voice of team members toward higher management, other teams or individuals in the organization in an attempt to challenge/change the status quo [team collective voice (TCV)]. The findings also reveal the characteristics of TCV (purpose, voicing and consensus mechanisms), TCV's different types and important roles in the context of an Eastern country operating under weak institutions.

Originality/value

This exploratory study was able to clarify different connotations of employee voice at the team level, which helps raise awareness among scholars on the collective nature of TV and guides successive researchers away from inconsistent understandings of the term. The study also reveals certain institutional conditions that foster this type of voice and suggests the employee voice concept should not be examined independently from the concept's institutional context. The proposed typology contributes comprehensively to this conceptual work of TCV as the topology reveals the concept's multidimensionality and aids future research on measurement construction.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 December 2022

Ali Ebrahimi, Mehdi Safari Gerayli and Hasan Valiyan

An important part of the effectiveness of a company is related to the stimuli of the organizational voice, which provides the context for participation and the emergence…

40

Abstract

Purpose

An important part of the effectiveness of a company is related to the stimuli of the organizational voice, which provides the context for participation and the emergence of moral courage in performing organizational tasks. Although individual voice stimulation cannot be easily generalized because of the wide range of criteria affecting it, but in a general category, individual voice stimuli can be separated into internal and external criteria. Therefore, this research first aims to examine internal and external stimuli on individual voice and then examines the effect of individual voice on internal auditors’ moral courage and effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The target population in this study were internal auditors of capital market companies that were examined in the period of 2020. The research tool was a questionnaire and partial least squares analysis was used to fit the model and test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results of testing the hypotheses show that self-efficacy (hope and resilience) as internal drivers and independence of internal audit performance and perceived supervisor support (external drivers) have a positive effect on moral courage and effectiveness of the internal auditor.

Originality/value

These conclusions suggest that if behavioral incentives are considered, auditors’ level of behavioral audacity in more realistically disclosing the financial performance of their companies can be expected to increase. It should also be noted that the results of this study can increase the level of effectiveness of internal auditors’ functions and their behavioral knowledge in the direction of professional functions.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Swati Singh and Sita Vanka

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of the employee voice in the present era. This paper discusses the drawbacks of not attending to employee voice

1686

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of the employee voice in the present era. This paper discusses the drawbacks of not attending to employee voice, benefits of listening to it and strategies, as well as the methods of capturing the voice of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses illustration to explain how Cisco used employee voice to revamp its HR.

Findings

The research on this area indicates that although listening to employee voice is beneficial, most organizations ignore it. The findings suggest that the voice of employee cannot be ignored in the technology-led era, as employees have many platforms to raise their concerns. Additionally, ignoring their voice can be perilous. Attending to employee voice brings many advantages, and thus it should be prioritized, promoted and practiced. The paper carries implications for HR managers, business leaders and researchers in this field.

Originality/value

This paper uniquely discusses the significance of employee voice in the present era. It also presents the strategies and methods to capture employee voice. Furthermore, it demonstrates the benefits of attending to employee voice with the help of an illustration.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 November 2022

Parinda Doshi and Priti Nigam

The paper is built upon the conceptual framework of ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO) to identify the effect of the high performance work system (HPWS) on the voice

Abstract

Purpose

The paper is built upon the conceptual framework of ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO) to identify the effect of the high performance work system (HPWS) on the voice behaviour of the organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The human resource department of the steel plants was approached to facilitate the data collection. A standardised questionnaire was used to collect responses from 169 full-time employees working at different levels and departments in the steel plant in India. Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to validate and examine the model identifying the relationship of AMO enhancing practices with the voice behaviour in the organisation.

Findings

AMO was found to affect voice behaviour in the organisation. The positive and significant effect of ability enhancement practices was examined on the acquiescent voice and the opportunity enhancing practices on the acquiescent and defensive voice in the organisation.

Practical implications

Even though the organisation has tried to improve the employee's ability through proper training and development efforts, the organisation still fails to develop confidence in the employee for giving the suggestion or opinions without hesitation. The research papers try to provide valuable suggestions to the human resource management (HRM) and other managers for improving the voice behaviour of the employees based on the current study that identifies the effect of AMO practices on the voice behaviour of the employees.

Originality/value

Factors affecting voice behaviour are not yet extensively studied in the Indian context. The researcher examined the effect of HPWS, considering the AMO framework on the organisation's acquiescent voice, defensive voice, and prosocial voice behaviour.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2022

Aidan McKearney, Rea Prouska, Monrudee Tungtakanpoung and John Opute

The purpose of this paper is to examine how employee voice in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) is shaped by national culture. Specifically, the paper explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how employee voice in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) is shaped by national culture. Specifically, the paper explores the relationship between national culture and organisational norms and signals. Furthermore, it explores the impact of such norms on employee voice behaviours. The paper chooses to address these issues in the SME context, in three countries with divergent cultural dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use Kwon and Farndale’s (2020) typology as our “a priori” framework to explore the influence of national cultural values and cultural tightness on SME organisation norms, signals and employee voice behaviours. Our study uses qualitative data gathered through in-depth interviews with SME employees in England, Nigeria and Thailand.

Findings

The results from our interviews are presented thematically. The data illustrates how the cultural dimensions identified by Kwon and Farndale (2020) can have an influence on organisational voice norms. The dimensions are power distance, uncertainty avoidance, in-group collectivism, performance orientation, assertiveness and cultural tightness.

Originality/value

Historically, the impact of national culture as a macro factor on voice has been largely ignored by academic research. Studies in non-western contexts are especially rare. This paper derives its originality by offering unique insights into the culture–voice relationship from both western and non-western perspectives. This provides an international, cross-cultural, comparative dimension to our study. This research includes findings from under-researched settings in Nigeria and Thailand.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2022

Yu-Teng Jacky Jang, Anne Yenching Liu and Wen-Yu Ke

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of anthropomorphism and identify factors related to adopting voice shopping on smart speakers.

156

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of anthropomorphism and identify factors related to adopting voice shopping on smart speakers.

Design/methodology/approach

Progress in partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) approach is used to test the proposed research framework regarding anthropomorphism and user perceptions on voice shopping via smart speakers. Individuals' responses to questions about attitude and intention to use voice shopping via smart speakers were collected and analyzed.

Findings

The results showed that anthropomorphism had a positive influence on satisfaction, which, in turn, had a positive impact on intention to adopt voice shopping, and customers had positive opinions regarding smart speakers.

Research limitations/implications

This study only reflects a younger perspective on smart speaker voice shopping. This study identified the characteristics of smart speakers that increase customers' intention to purchase, which can be used to formulate sales strategies and management guidelines.

Practical implications

This research provided a new perspective to enable practitioners to promote smart speakers for voice shopping. Smart speaker manufacturers can utilize the findings of this research to improve the system design of smart speakers to further facilitate voice shopping.

Originality/value

Unlike previous studies, which focused on product attributes of smart speakers or voice shopping experiences, this study provided a clear picture of how the anthropomorphic feature of smart speakers affects customers' intention to adopt voice shopping.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 December 2022

Carolin Ischen, Theo B. Araujo, Hilde A.M. Voorveld, Guda Van Noort and Edith G. Smit

Virtual assistants are increasingly used for persuasive purposes, employing the different modalities of voice and text (or a combination of the two). In this study, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Virtual assistants are increasingly used for persuasive purposes, employing the different modalities of voice and text (or a combination of the two). In this study, the authors compare the persuasiveness of voice-and text-based virtual assistants. The authors argue for perceived human-likeness and cognitive load as underlying mechanisms that can explain why voice- and text-based assistants differ in their persuasive potential by suppressing the activation of consumers' persuasion knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

A pre-registered online-experiment (n = 450) implemented a text-based and two voice-based (with and without interaction history displayed in text) virtual assistants.

Findings

Findings show that, contrary to expectations, a text-based assistant is perceived as more human-like compared to a voice-based assistant (regardless of whether the interaction history is displayed), which in turn positively influences brand attitudes and purchase intention. The authors also find that voice as a communication modality can increase persuasion knowledge by being cognitively more demanding in comparison to text.

Practical implications

Simply using voice as a presumably human cue might not suffice to give virtual assistants a human-like appeal. For the development of virtual assistants, it might be beneficial to actively engage consumers to increase awareness of persuasion.

Originality/value

The current study adds to the emergent research stream considering virtual assistants in explicitly exploring modality differences between voice and text (and a combination of the two) and provides insights into the effects of persuasion coming from virtual assistants.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Patrick Kelly

This chapter examines the integration of Giving Voice to Values (GVV) into an accounting ethics course. GVV has received a great deal of interest by business educators in…

Abstract

This chapter examines the integration of Giving Voice to Values (GVV) into an accounting ethics course. GVV has received a great deal of interest by business educators in the past decade and, more recently, by those accounting faculty who teach accounting ethics in a standalone course or as part of another course. This chapter describes GVV assumptions and principles that are helpful for any faculty considering adopting GVV. After a brief review of different instructional approaches for teaching accounting ethics, GVV literature relating to accounting ethics is examined. The integration of GVV builds on the Kelly (2017) integration of leadership topics in an accounting ethics course and synergistically promotes moral motivation and moral character that contributes to ethical behavior. To facilitate the integration efforts, this chapter presents specific learning objectives, GVV background materials, case recommendations, and application/assessment approaches. This chapter concludes with a discussion of GVV and its possible role in assurance of learning efforts.

Book part
Publication date: 18 April 2022

Jean Clarke and Mark P. Healey

We argue that voice – the sound that people produce when they speak – is an important resource for entrepreneurs, especially when they are pitching to potential investors

Abstract

We argue that voice – the sound that people produce when they speak – is an important resource for entrepreneurs, especially when they are pitching to potential investors. We integrate evidence from entrepreneurship, social psychology and linguistics to show that the voice can be regarded both as a tool for entrepreneurs to utilize and as a vital source of information allowing listeners to make judgements about the speaker and their message. To better understand how the voice may be used and interpreted in investment pitches, we develop a model of the relationship between the entrepreneurial voice and investor judgments. Voice depends on entrepreneurs’ characteristics including gender and communication goals but can be utilized to express emotions (purposefully or not) and signal qualities such as competence and trustworthiness. How potential investors interpret these displays depends on cultural expectations and stereotypes. Our review illustrates that female entrepreneurs may find it more difficult to persuade investors due to their naturally higher voice pitch and bias against speech patterns prevalent among young women. We highlight directions for future research exploring the voice as a unique cultural resource for entrepreneurs.

Details

Advances in Cultural Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-207-2

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 62000