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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Nicholas Vogelpoel and Kara Jarrold

The purpose of this paper is to describe the benefits of a social prescribing service for older people with sensory impairments experiencing social isolation. The paper…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the benefits of a social prescribing service for older people with sensory impairments experiencing social isolation. The paper draws on the findings from a 12-week programme run by Sense, a voluntary sector organisation, and illustrates how integrated services, combining arts-based participation and voluntary sector support, can create positive health and wellbeing outcomes for older people.

Design/methodology/approach

The research took a mixed-methodological approach, conducting and analysing data from interviews and dynamic observation proformas with facilitators and quantitative psychological wellbeing scores with participants throughout the course of the programme. Observations and case study data were also collected to complement and contextualise the data sets.

Findings

The research found that participatory arts programmes can help combat social isolation amongst older people with sensory impairments and can offer an important alliance for social care providers who are required to reach more people under increasing pecuniary pressures. The research also highlights other benefits for health and wellbeing in the group including increased self-confidence, new friendships, increased mental wellbeing and reduced social isolation.

Research limitations/implications

The research was based on a sample size of 12 people with sensory impairments and therefore may lack generalisability. However, similar outcomes for people engaging in participatory arts through social prescription are documented elsewhere in the literature.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for existing health and social care services and argues that delivering more integrated services that combine health and social care pathways with arts provision have the potential to create social and medical health benefits without being care/support resource heavy.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils a need to understand and develop services that are beneficial to older people who become sensory impaired in later life. This cohort is growing and, at present, there are very few services for this community at high risk of social isolation.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Carol Smith

This article reports on a national project being developed by the Royal National Institute of the Blind. It is aimed at improving health and social care for older people…

Abstract

This article reports on a national project being developed by the Royal National Institute of the Blind. It is aimed at improving health and social care for older people with sight problems, by focusing on some of the standards of the National Service Framework for older people and applying them to older people with sight problems. The project will identify, develop and disseminate good practice by establishing two pilot sites and conducting desk research.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Ghasson Shabha

The purpose of this research is to explore the relationship of a few sensory environmental parameters, mainly visual and acoustical stimuli, with childrens' behaviour and…

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2130

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore the relationship of a few sensory environmental parameters, mainly visual and acoustical stimuli, with childrens' behaviour and performance in special needs schools.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of teaching layouts and the sequence of activities in ten selected special needs schools have been conducted using questionnaire directed at carers and teachers. The findings were cross‐validated via open‐ended interviews with teachers and carers to glean more in‐depth understanding about sensory influences.

Findings

Several sensory parameters were observed in the teaching environment: bright colours and light, pattern glare, echoing, higher and low‐pitch sound and background noise level. The study identified numerous factors having a negative effect on children's behaviour.

Practical implications

This paper provides further understanding of the key factors contributing to the quality of teaching environment consistent with user's need and expectations. It provides suggestions regarding the briefing and design to support childrens' performance. This can assist in developing alternative design guidelines based on users‐centered approach to schools design.

Originality/value

This paper will highlight issues for open discussion amongst all those involved in the process of planning, design and management of school environments which further reduce the undesirable consequences of the aforementioned parameters towards improving their operational efficiency in use.

Details

Facilities, vol. 24 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Arvid Nikolai Kildahl, Maria Hagen Engebretsen, Kristin Horndalsveen, Jane Margrete Askeland Hellerud, Jorunn Ytrehorn Wiik, Gro Aasen and Sissel Berge Helverschou

Psychiatric assessment in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID) is complex and challenging. With co-occurring congenital blindness…

Abstract

Purpose

Psychiatric assessment in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID) is complex and challenging. With co-occurring congenital blindness, this complexity is increased. Systematic knowledge about psychiatric assessment in this combination of challenges is virtually non-existing, and there is little guidance available for clinicians faced with this task. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Experiences from comprehensive psychiatric assessments in two adults with congenital blindness, ASD, and ID are explored and discussed.

Findings

Adaptation of assessment procedures usually employed for individuals with ASD and ID involved no major alteration, but co-operation between mental health and visual impairment professionals was important, as was the involvement of the families of the individuals in question. In both cases, the patient met criteria for an anxiety disorder, underlining the vulnerability and the challenges involved in living with this combination of challenges.

Research limitations/implications

There is an urgent need for research into mental health issues for this group, including case studies describing successful treatment or intervention for these issues.

Practical implications

Psychiatric assessment in individuals with this combination of challenges may be feasible, but requires involvement of professionals specializing in mental health in developmental disabilities, and professionals in visual impairment. Assessments need to be individually adapted.

Originality/value

This is the first study systematically describing psychiatric assessment in this group involving the use of checklists and assessment tools. Strategies and tools that were useful are described and discussed to aid other clinicians faced with similar challenges.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2013

Emily R. Rosario, Melissa R. Bustos and Colleen Moore

Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are a significant public health problem that affect an estimated 1.7 million US residents yearly. TBI patients experience a variety of…

Abstract

Purpose

Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are a significant public health problem that affect an estimated 1.7 million US residents yearly. TBI patients experience a variety of symptoms related to physical functioning, sensory processing, cognition, communication, behavior, and mental health, all of which differ in severity by individual. Recent evidence suggests that hypothalamic pituitary dysfunction may be impacting recovery. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness about the frequency of hypothalamic pituitary dysfunction following a TBI and its effect on functional recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the literature regarding hypothalamic pituitary dysfunction following TBI and discusses the potential benefits of hormone replacement therapy for individuals with hormone deficiencies.

Findings

The rate of hypothalamic pituitary dysfunction following TBI has been reported as anywhere between 25 and 80 percent. Specifically, abnormal hormone levels, both chronic and acute, are generally estimated to be approximately 5-22 percent for thyroid hormones, 15-33 percent for growth hormone (GH), and 25-80 percent for testosterone. The effect of hypopituitarism has been reported on several aspects cognitive and physical function as well as overall quality of life. In these studies, GH and testosterone deficiencies appear to underlie the observed impairments.

Originality/value

The paper suggests the importance of understanding and screening for hypothalamic pituitary dysfunction as hormone replacement therapy may be a beneficial intervention to promote physical and cognitive rehabilitation.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 4 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Aristotelis Naniopoulos, Panagiotis Tsalis and Dimitrios Nalmpantis

The purpose of this paper is to develop accessible tourism in two areas of Greece and Turkey. The areas of Drama in Greece and Mersin in Turkey have cooperated in the…

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2655

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop accessible tourism in two areas of Greece and Turkey. The areas of Drama in Greece and Mersin in Turkey have cooperated in the frame of MEDRA project to assess their potential and set up a plan for developing accessible tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

The choice of the two areas was not random. Mersin currently enjoys continuous development, as one of Turkey’s biggest ports and a free trade zone. Drama is a developing area in agricultural manufacturing and high-tech sectors with a rich physical environment which aspires to develop a healthy alternative tourism industry.

Findings

The findings include, amongst others, the identification of needs of tourists with disabilities, and the relevant historical evolution, legislative framework, international good practices, policy-improvement proposals, accessibility assessment in Mersin and Drama, and suggestions for developing accessible infrastructure together with the training of stakeholders.

Practical/implications

Greece although made a lot of progress regarding the issues of disability and accessibility still is not on the same level as many European countries, while Turkey has a lot to learn in order to deal with accessibility from a holistic point of view.

Social/implications

Both countries owe a large percentage of their national income, to the tourist industry and seek ways to gain advantages in this highly competitive sector.

Originality/value

The successful implementation of the MEDRA project constitutes an example worthy of a wider application in the development of accessible tourism, not only in the two countries but also to countries with similar characteristics.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Sarah Elgie and Nick Maguire

Intensive interaction (II) recognises the pre‐verbal nature of adults with profound learning disabilities and mimics the early attachment process to develop the very…

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342

Abstract

Intensive interaction (II) recognises the pre‐verbal nature of adults with profound learning disabilities and mimics the early attachment process to develop the very beginnings of communication and sociability. This paper Reports on the use of II with a remote and withdrawn adult with severe learning disabilities and visual impairments, who engaged in serious self‐injurious behaviour. The results indicate that the intervention was successful in facilitating the development of the first stages of social and communication skills.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Asiye Ayben Celik and Enis Yakut

The purpose of this paper, focusing on the visually impaired and legally blind consumer, is to explore the relationship between the perceived consumer vulnerability on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper, focusing on the visually impaired and legally blind consumer, is to explore the relationship between the perceived consumer vulnerability on customer satisfaction and the effect of satisfaction on the intention of repurchase and recommendation as the determinants of store loyalty in an apparel store context.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted on 216 visually impaired and legally blind consumers in the province of Manisa, Turkey, concerning their apparel shopping store experiences to examine how the perceived vulnerability influences visually impaired and legally blind consumers’ satisfaction, recommendation and repurchase intentions. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results of the study revealed that as the visually impaired and legally blind consumers perceive themselves more vulnerable, they become more satisfied with the store, and that the more they are satisfied with the store, the more their intention to recommend that store and purchase intention from that store increases. However, the authors’ investigation showed no significant differences between the consumers who were born blind and who became blind later in their life.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature by extending the understanding of visually impaired and legally blind consumers’ perceived vulnerability in the brick-and-mortar stores and demonstrates how it is related to satisfaction as a major driver of post-purchase intentions like recommendation and repurchase. It also exhibits the fact that blind consumers – both congenitally blind and subsequently blind – cope with this vulnerability through their own solutions to go on their lives, and they do not perceive themselves as vulnerable, as it is perceived by the able-bodied.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2014

A person’s value in terms of physical and mental abilities, talents and skills is not simply located in degrees of her/his body’s ability to function. Efforts to achieve…

Abstract

A person’s value in terms of physical and mental abilities, talents and skills is not simply located in degrees of her/his body’s ability to function. Efforts to achieve social and workplace equality for people with a physical/body or psychological/mental disability have grown to a transnational social movement. The community of people with a disability may be among the largest, most diverse group of people. By examining disability through lenses of cultural, economic, and political contexts, Chapter 10 underscores the importance of understanding how and why experiences and issues associated with social identity shaped by these dimensions has captured the attention of policymakers and employers around the world.

A person’s identity is socially constructed and impacted by government policy, cultural values, and organizational decision making. The field of disability studies is dedicated to advancing greater understanding of experiences of people with a disability and empowering them to pursue happy and fulfilling lives. Institutionalized manifestations of stigma, ableism, discrimination, and bias diminish these pursuits, however. People everywhere and the organizations staffed and managed by them are urged to consider the positive outcomes of fully embracing people with a disability for their ability to perform responsibilities and to bring unique perspectives on organizational practices and exchanges with key stakeholders. Chapter 10 examines subthemes central to the study of social identity among people with a disability: paradigm shift and policy making about disability, legislation and policy, people working with a disability in organizations, language and naming debates, and disability and other social identity intersectionalities.

Details

Practical and Theoretical Implications of Successfully Doing Difference in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-678-1

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

M. Alexandra Da Fonte, Miriam C. Boesch and Katie Clouse

Given the rise of individuals who have complex communication needs (CCN), it is important to identify appropriate assistive technology systems that can support the…

Abstract

Given the rise of individuals who have complex communication needs (CCN), it is important to identify appropriate assistive technology systems that can support the individual's communication needs. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems can serve as a means to assist individuals to communicate independently. The goal of AAC is to enhance or replace the individual's current and limited verbal or written communication skills. This chapter focuses on feature matching, aided communication and the selection process for aided communication systems including low to high technology systems. It also emphasises other key considerations pertaining to person-centred planning such as conducting preference assessments and trial periods to minimise system abandonment.

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