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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Shaun Gravestock, Dinal Vekaria and Elaine Hurault

We report the case of a man with Asperger's syndrome and borderline intelligence, atypical eating disorder (food faddiness/refusal due to fear of choking) and XYY syndrome

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108

Abstract

We report the case of a man with Asperger's syndrome and borderline intelligence, atypical eating disorder (food faddiness/refusal due to fear of choking) and XYY syndrome. We consider multi‐modal management and inter‐agency service provision issues in meeting his complex mental health and social needs.

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Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Nick Morey and Richard Woolrych

Housing Options is an independent advisory service for people with learning disabilities, their relatives and housing and care providers. Housing Options wanted to promote…

Abstract

Housing Options is an independent advisory service for people with learning disabilities, their relatives and housing and care providers. Housing Options wanted to promote the development of opportunities for those with autism, to help those growing up and wanting their own home. A two‐year project has begun with help from the Shirley Foundation, to review need, demand and the range of existing services, look at what services local authorities, providers and families want and provide information and guidance to help with service development.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2020

Clare Sarah Allely

There remains a lack of knowledge surrounding paraphilic or deviant arousal sexual behaviours in individuals with Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (Kellaher, 2015). The…

Abstract

Purpose

There remains a lack of knowledge surrounding paraphilic or deviant arousal sexual behaviours in individuals with Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (Kellaher, 2015). The purpose of this paper is to explore the literature for any empirical study, case study or discussion/review paper surrounding individuals with ASD and zoophilia or bestiality.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic PRISMA review was conducted.

Findings

This systematic review highlighted only a small number of papers, which have looked at zoophilia or bestiality in individuals with ASD. Only one article was identified as being relevant in the present review, three further articles included a description of a case involving someone with ASD who engaged in zoophilia or bestiality and another paper, although not the focus of the study, found one person with Asperger’s disorder who had several paraphilias including olfactophilia, podophilia and zoophilia in a sample of 20 institutionalised, male adolescents and young adults with Autistic disorder and borderline/mild mental retardation. All the case studies clearly highlight some of the ASD symptomology that can contribute to engaging in bestiality or zoophilia.

Practical implications

It is important that individuals with ASD have access to appropriate and timely sex education and that parents are supported by healthcare professionals to engage with their children with ASD in such interactions across the autism spectrum irrespective of the parent’s expectations.

Originality/value

To the author’s knowledge, this is the first review of ASD in relation to bestiality and zoophilia.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2018

Clare S. Allely

Patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) present with specific assessment, specific difficulties, needs and therapeutic issues and therefore are a challenging group…

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Abstract

Purpose

Patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) present with specific assessment, specific difficulties, needs and therapeutic issues and therefore are a challenging group for forensic services. Given the challenge that individuals with ASD present to forensic services, the suggested increase in the number of this group within this setting and the relatively little amount of research which suggests they face a number of difficulties within the prison environment, the purpose of this paper is to identify and review all the studies which have been carried out investigating any aspect of ASD in relation to secure hospital settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven internet-based bibliographic databases were used for the present review. The review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines.

Findings

A total of 12 studies were included in this review; 3 looked at the prevalence of ASD in secure psychiatric hospitals. One study evaluated the clinical utility of the AQ screening tool to assess self-reported autistic traits in secure psychiatric settings. Three explored any type of characteristics of patients with ASD detained in secure psychiatric hospitals. One study investigated the experiences or quality of life of patients with an ASD detained in secure psychiatric care. Two studies investigated awareness, knowledge and/or views regarding patients with ASD held by staff working within secure psychiatric hospitals. Lastly, three studies (one of which was also included in the prevalence category above) looked at the effectiveness of interventions or treatment of patients with ASD in secure psychiatric hospitals. Clinical recommendations and future research directions are discussed.

Originality/value

To the author’s knowledge, this is the first review to explore what research has been carried out looking specifically at patients with ASD in relation to secure forensic settings.

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Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2020

Johanna E. Mercer and Clare Sarah Allely

Despite an increasing number of studies that examine sexual offending behaviour in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) individuals, there has been a lack of research…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite an increasing number of studies that examine sexual offending behaviour in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) individuals, there has been a lack of research investigating stalking and ASD. This study aims to carry out a scoping review following PRISMA guidelines to identify studies which have been carried out exploring stalking behaviour in individuals with threshold or subthreshold ASD.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of five bibliographic databases were searched to identify studies which explored ASD in relation to stalking and harassment (including case studies as well as empirical studies).

Findings

A total of five relevant articles were identified in the present review. One article contained a case study. In a short report, the authors discussed stalking and ASD. One paper explored ASD and stalking behaviour in employment settings and specific interventions that could be used in such environments. Another paper focused on stalking behaviour in those with ASD in school settings. The final paper examined stalking and social and romantic functioning in individuals with ASD. This final paper contained only the empirical study identified in this search.

Practical implications

The studies identified in this review clearly highlight the need for intensive socio-sexual interventions to improve social interaction skills and romantic functioning in individuals with ASD. There is also a need for schools to provide sex education programs for individuals with ASD.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first review looking at ASD and stalking.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Tony Attwood

This paper provides a brief overview of research, knowledge and practice regarding Asperger's syndrome, an autistic spectrum disorder that has only recently been…

Abstract

This paper provides a brief overview of research, knowledge and practice regarding Asperger's syndrome, an autistic spectrum disorder that has only recently been acknowledged by clinicians. The paper reviews our knowledge of the degree and nature of the impairments of social understanding of such individuals, especially their problems with making and keeping friends, perception of social and emotional cues, understanding and management of emotions, and ability to recognise the thoughts and feelings of others. Difficulties with communication and conversation skills are explained, as well as the person's tendency to develop areas of expertise and special interests. People with Asperger's syndrome have an unusual profile of cognitive abilities; some have signs of movement disturbance and some are extraordinarily perceptive of sensory experiences. The prevalence and aetiology of Asperger's syndrome are discussed briefly.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Phillip Vaughan

A survey was undertaken to determine the number of young people needing secure psychiatric inpatient care as at 1st January 2001. Twenty‐three individuals were identified…

Abstract

A survey was undertaken to determine the number of young people needing secure psychiatric inpatient care as at 1st January 2001. Twenty‐three individuals were identified who were placed in a variety of settings. However, few of the placements could be considered ideal. There was a wide range of diagnoses, and most young people had additional problems of social and education deficits and offending behaviour.Specialist resources need to be made available to local secure and residential facilities to reduce the need for secure placements. However, there may be a case for developing a regional secure service although, given the wide range of needs presented, it is unlikely that a single secure resource could meet them all.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Eddie Chaplin

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Abstract

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Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2011

Elizabeth Fein

The ways in which the brain, as mapped by bioscience, has become popularly understood as the locus and determinant of the self is a topic of increasing importance within…

Abstract

The ways in which the brain, as mapped by bioscience, has become popularly understood as the locus and determinant of the self is a topic of increasing importance within medical sociology. Nikolas Rose has influentially chronicled the emergence of a “neurochemical self,” determined by brain chemistry and thus fluid, malleable, and open to improvement via increasingly fine-tuned psychopharmacology. This chapter argues for the contemporaneous emergence of a neurostructural self, intrinsic to the growing neurodiversity movement. Drawing on trends in contemporary neuroscience and biological psychiatry, this model of “brainhood” conceptualizes the brain-as-self as a material system: governed by physical laws, and thus both morally innocent and robustly predictable. Rather than being infinitely open to intervention and optimization, however, the neurostructural self is imagined as fixed and immutable, resistant to the medical intervention and presumption of infinite flexibility inherent within neurochemical selfhood. This chapter draws on a two-year ethnographic study of autism spectrum disorders in North America, investigating the ways in which circulating discourses about medicine, culture, and identity are shaping the emergence, development and use of autism spectrum diagnoses in contexts of daily practice. In this chapter, I explore why individuals with the autism spectrum disorder known as Asperger's syndrome are particularly effective examplars, consumers, and producers of this neurostructural selfhood.

Details

Sociological Reflections on the Neurosciences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-881-6

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