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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Chien‐Chi Tseng

The purpose of this research is to explore the relationships among self‐directed learning and entrepreneurial learning; and the relationships among entrepreneurial learning

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore the relationships among self‐directed learning and entrepreneurial learning; and the relationships among entrepreneurial learning and entrepreneurial performance through a literature review. This paper reviews the characteristics of self‐directed learning that are important in supporting entrepreneurial learning. A conceptual framework outlining the relationships among self‐directed learning and entrepreneurial learning is provided to illustrate how these relationships can enhance entrepreneurial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Key words are identified to use in the literature search. All of the several electronic databases available in the online library, including both journal and book sources, are used to search for resources, as well as Google Scholar and Google Search.

Findings

Entrepreneurs who learn and develop their self‐management and self‐monitoring skills have more opportunities to enhance entrepreneurial knowledge and experiences in the entrepreneurial development process. The research generates valuable outcomes and findings for future business and entrepreneurship study: self‐directed learning has emerged as an important area of inquiry in relation to entrepreneurial learning, as well as entrepreneurial performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study was exploratory, based on the literature review. Further studies are needed using empirical research to examine why some characteristics of self‐directed learning and entrepreneurial learning are better used to enhance the outcomes of entrepreneurial performance.

Originality/value

The research constructs a conceptual framework to outline the relationships among self‐directed learning, entrepreneurial learning, and entrepreneurial performance. Value was created when self‐directed learning and entrepreneurial learning are identified as the key factors for the entrepreneurial performance.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Isabel Raemdonck, Rien van der Leeden, Martin Valcke, Mien Segers and Jo Thijssen

This study aims to examine which variables at the level of the individual employee and at the company level are predictors of self‐directed learning in low‐qualified employees.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine which variables at the level of the individual employee and at the company level are predictors of self‐directed learning in low‐qualified employees.

Methodology

Results were obtained from a sample of 408 low‐qualified employees from 35 different companies. The companies were selected from the energy sector, the chemical industry and the food industry. Multilevel analysis was applied to examine which variables are significant predictors of perceived self‐directed learning.

Findings

At the company level, the economic sector in which the employee is employed in particular played a striking role in the prediction of self‐directedness, as did presence of a participatory staff policy. At the level of the individual employee, a proactive personality (a disposition to take personal initiative in a broad range of activities and situations), striving for knowledge work, past learning initiative, task variety and the growth potential of the job were significant predictors of self‐directed learning.

Originality/value

Research on the predictors of self‐directed learning has primarily focused on correlational studies examining the relation between individual variables and level of self‐directedness. There is little research available that systematically traces the extent to which individual as well as company factors play a role in level of self‐directed learning. Nor is it clear which category of variables should be considered as the most critical. In addition, earlier research on this subject has mainly focused on a higher‐qualified group of workers (employees with at least a diploma of secondary education). Factors that are predictors of self‐directed learning and their relative weight might differ for certain groups of employees. This issue has hardly been addressed up to now.

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Fahri Karakas and Alperen Manisaligil

The purpose of this paper is to identify the new role that human resource developers play in the globally connected workplace. Towards that end, this paper explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the new role that human resource developers play in the globally connected workplace. Towards that end, this paper explores the changing landscape of self‐directed learning (SDL) within the digital ecosystem based on the concept of World 2.0.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews and builds on the literatures of self‐directed learning and Web 2.0 technologies to explore how self‐directed learning is being transformed in the creative digital era.

Findings

The paper outlines five transformations that change the landscape of workplace learning in the creative digital era: virtual collaboration, technological convergence, global connectivity, online communities, and digital creativity.

Practical implications

This paper gives extensive guidance on how HRD specialists and practitioners can transform their strategies to adapt to the training needs of employees in the creative digital era. The paper provides new ideas and vision for industrial trainers and human resource development practitioners on self‐directed learning.

Research limitations/implications

This article provides some future research areas and limitations.

Originality/value

This paper opens up new possibilities for self‐directed learning and discusses how self‐directed learning might be transformed in the light of technological and workplace changes. In particular, self‐directed learning might decrease the HRD/training costs significantly while providing employees with just‐in time training.

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Ida Hutasuhut, Shahren Ahmad Zaidi Adruce and Victoria Jonathan

This study aims to provide empirical evidence of how the five disciplines of learning organization introduced by Senge (1990) are practiced and how it could cultivate…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide empirical evidence of how the five disciplines of learning organization introduced by Senge (1990) are practiced and how it could cultivate self-directed learning among employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study used a case study approach to get an in-depth understanding of how organizational learning is practiced in an innovative motorcycle-manufacturing company in Indonesia. A total of 30 staff and managers were selected purposively and interviewed by using a semi-structured interview to gain information about their experience in practicing the 5 disciplines in their daily work–life. Among the 30 participants, 11 were at the managerial level and 19 were at the staff level. Data collected were analyzed using a content analysis approach.

Findings

This study provides empirical evidence of how self-directed learning is cultivated in an organization that applies the five disciplines of learning organization introduced by Senge (1990). This study found that to cultivate self-directed learning, an organization needs to build a working climate where the five disciplines are integrated into daily work–life. Organizations need to ensure that its vision is shared by each of the employee, build synergy for personal mastery and team learning, train their employees to continuously refine their mental models and improve their ability to think using a systems approach.

Practical implications

The implications and recommendations arising from this study, first, provide insight to managers and human resource (HR) practitioners about the importance of creating a conducive working environment for learning. Moreover, with learning facilities in the era of industrial revolution 4.0, organizations need to shift their attention on how to transfer the responsibility of learning to the hands of the employees and HR practitioners should focus on providing more opportunities for employees to direct their own learning. Second, to support a learning environment that is conducive for cultivating self-directedness in learning requires commitment from top leaders in the organization.

Originality/value

This study observed that Senge’s approach to organizational learning focuses heavily on the individual’s processes and the interactions between them. Further studies are suggested to integrate knowledge management, particularly on how new knowledge is gained, stored, created, used and disseminated under the five pillars of the learning organization. It is also recommended to look at a broader perspective, such as the role of technology in intensifying learning and the role of strategic leadership in learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Svenja Tams

This study aims to examine the influence of individual differences on self‐directed social learning and self‐efficacy. Inter‐dependent self‐construal, agreeableness, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the influence of individual differences on self‐directed social learning and self‐efficacy. Inter‐dependent self‐construal, agreeableness, and extraversion were expected to predict five ways of self‐directed social learning: relating, benchmarking, modeling, identifying, and distancing.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 356 responses from professionals to a questionnaire survey. Using step‐wise regression analyses, the effect of individual differences on social learning and self‐efficacy, as well as the mediation of the latter relationship by the five ways of social learning, were examined.

Findings

Inter‐dependent self‐construal predicted social learning and self‐efficacy. Its negative effect on self‐efficacy was mediated by relating. Agreeableness and extraversion predicted high self‐efficacy. Extraversion predicted modeling, identifying and distancing. Surprisingly, women appeared more likely to engage in social learning.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design does not permit conclusions about causality and results may be biased by the exclusive use of self‐report measures.

Practical implications

Understanding how individual differences influence self‐directed social learning and self‐efficacy assists managers and organizations in providing more personalized coaching. Since the link between an inter‐dependent self‐construal, social learning, and low self‐efficacy is more likely among minorities from collectivist cultures, they may be less inclined to pursue opportunities for professional growth. They may be systematically disadvantaged in organizations that value assertiveness over attention to one's social environment. In contrast, individuals whose self‐efficacy judgments are grounded in extraverted or agreeable dispositions may ignore feedback and social referents that indicate a need for adaptation.

Originality/value

This article indicates that individual differences predict self‐directed social learning and self‐efficacy.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Han-Kuang Tien, Bang-Lee Chang and Yen-Ku Kuo

The purpose of this paper is to explore if experience stimulates or stifles creativity. It shows that accumulation of work experience improves an individual’s judgment and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore if experience stimulates or stifles creativity. It shows that accumulation of work experience improves an individual’s judgment and reduces divergent thinking of creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the factors influencing individual creativity, including the impact of work experience, using 509 responses to questionnaires from 500 top construction companies. The research hypothesis is evaluated using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The main factors affecting individual creativity are a positive mind-set, self-directed learning, and low self-monitoring. Self-directed learning has the greatest influence on the creativity of individuals with accumulated work experience, while low self-monitoring influences the creativity of people with less work experience.

Research limitations/implications

A better way to study individual creativity is longitudinal research, which involves long-time observation of the life cycle of creativity among organizational members, who are like products with a life cycle. Further study is necessary to show why some members are creative only for a short time (short life cycle) while some are creative for a longer (very long life cycle) period.

Originality/value

This study finds that employee creativity derives from the self-directed learning process as it helps to accumulate experience. This result indicates that construction firms can train employees to improve their self-directed learning and boost creativity. Experienced workers need more attention because they are trapped in their previous experience and it is difficult to train them.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Junaidah Hashim

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Malaysian managers acquire job competencies through self‐directed learning activities at their workplace. Specifically it aims…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Malaysian managers acquire job competencies through self‐directed learning activities at their workplace. Specifically it aims to investigate what types of job competencies are required for the managers, how they learn to acquire those competencies, and whether the managers have the self‐directed learning attributes and capability to acquire job competencies by self‐directed learning activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through survey. The survey adapted the Self‐Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDLRS) developed by Guglielmino. In total 238 respondents participated in this study.

Findings

The findings show that the respondents have identified communication, managerial, and job knowledge as the main competencies required for their jobs. Most of these competencies are acquired through on‐the‐job training, working as part of a team and self‐education. The findings also reveal that the respondents do possess the attributes of self‐directed learners.

Research limitations/implications

The findings support previous research. Given the different cultural background of the Malaysian managers, their ways of learning are similar to those of Western managers. Future research can investigate how employees in other professions learn on their jobs and what other factors may influence self‐directed learning.

Practical implications

Given the emphasis being placed on the importance of work place learning, it is timely to advance a workplace curriculum by integrating the everyday learning experiences and guided learning strategy in the organisation, so that the employees' learning can be facilitated more effectively.

Originality/value

The paper includes the different cultural context of how Malaysian managers learn.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

David Gijbels, Isabel Raemdonck, Dries Vervecken and Jonas Van Herck

A central issue in the field of workplace learning is how work‐related learning can be stimulated so that a powerful learning work environment is created. This paper seeks…

Abstract

Purpose

A central issue in the field of workplace learning is how work‐related learning can be stimulated so that a powerful learning work environment is created. This paper seeks to further enlarge understanding on this issue. Based on the demand‐control‐support the aim is to investigate the influence of job‐characteristics on the work‐related learning behaviour of the worker such as job demands, job control, social support at work on the one hand and self‐directed learning orientation on the other.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took place in the ICT‐department of a large company in Flanders. By means of an online questionnaire, all employees of the ICT‐department were asked to complete this questionnaire, which, apart from general information on the participants (age, gender, prior education, etc.), consisted of statements on five scales (job demands, job control, social support, self‐directed learning orientation, and work‐related learning behaviour) adapted from validated instruments. There was a total of 73 participants (response rate of 52 per cent, 73 per cent men, 27 per cent women, age varying from 20‐51 years old). In addition, all scales had Cronbach's alpha values above 0.79. Relations between the variables under study were tested using the Pearson correlation. The predictive value of the variables for the variance in work‐related learning was tested using the enter method of a multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The regression analyses show that job demands and job control were moderately positive and significantly linked with work‐related learning behaviour. Social support did not show a significant positive correlation with work‐related learning at all. Self‐directed learning orientation on the contrary had a strong and positive relation with work‐related learning. The results of the linear regression analyses indicated that only the self‐directed learning orientation scale significantly predicted the work‐related learning behaviour.

Originality/value

The study is one of the few investigations that takes into account both the role of personal and workplace‐related variables in order to better understand work‐related learning. The results stress that personal related variables such as self‐regulated learning orientation need to be taken into account in further research and in the daily practice of human resources development.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

David O’Donnell

Habermas’ concept of communicative rationality, in which reason is construed in terms of the noncoercive intersubjectivity of mutual understanding and reciprocal…

Abstract

Habermas’ concept of communicative rationality, in which reason is construed in terms of the noncoercive intersubjectivity of mutual understanding and reciprocal recognition, provides a valid foundation on which the theory and practice of selves‐directed learning can be developed. In an increasingly individualized world a focus on learning networks allows a perspective transformation from the purely individualistic instrumental rationality of self‐directedlearning towards communicative interaction via learning encounters and the possibility of satisfying the emancipatory conditions of communicative rationality within communities of selves‐directed‐learners in life and work. The orientation of communicative action to criticizable validity claims which are open to empirical investigation is the central core that makes this learning process both theoretically and practically possible.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 23 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Zamzami Zainuddin and Corinne Jacqueline Perera

This paper aims to examine the impact of the learning management system (LMS), in promoting students’ self-directed experiential learning using the flipped classroom…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of the learning management system (LMS), in promoting students’ self-directed experiential learning using the flipped classroom approach. This study further evaluates the effectiveness of integrating video lectures, perceived as a social interface, for students to watch, prior to their class session conducted in class.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study that investigated a group of undergraduate students of English as a foreign language (EFL) to identify the impact of the LMS TES BlendSpace in fostering their self-directed learning capacity, using a flipped classroom approach. Data were gathered through a qualitative approach from student interviews and observations of student activities and video-recordings uploaded on TES BlendSpace.

Findings

Flipped classrooms have begun to redesign learning spaces and promote active learning through video-enabled instructional practices. This study provides an overview of flipped classrooms and the benefits students’ gain from the wealth of online content posted on the LMS. The flipped classroom model has clearly shifted the learning paradigm, enabling students the autonomy of their self-directed learning pace and to become acquainted with the currency of video lectures that promote efficacious learning. This study concludes with implications for further research in this area.

Originality/value

This study has the potential to contribute towards the advancement of students’ self-directed learning and proposes its continued application for future EFL classes in this institution, as well as across all courses, to enable self-direction for all students.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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