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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Colin W. Fuller

This paper reports an employee‐management consensus approach for identifying safety initiatives that are both appropriate to the working environment and also perceived to…

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2562

Abstract

This paper reports an employee‐management consensus approach for identifying safety initiatives that are both appropriate to the working environment and also perceived to be appropriate by the workforce. Issues affecting the success of employee involvement schemes are discussed and the methods used during the implementation stages of the programme to address them are described. The case study was set in the UK distribution division of an international oil company and was applied to safety issues affecting the division’s tanker drivers. The study used an employee questionnaire to assess drivers’ perceptions of safety management, workplace conditions and safety concerns. Factor analysis and structural equation modelling were used to develop a management/workplace/workforce model to describe the drivers’ working environment. The model was then used to discuss and explain the drivers’ choices of safety initiatives.

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Employee Relations, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2009

Pornlert Arpanutud, Suwimon Keeratipibul, Araya Charoensupaya and Eunice Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to investigate factors affecting the adoption of food‐safety management systems by Thai food‐manufacturing firms.

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2389

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate factors affecting the adoption of food‐safety management systems by Thai food‐manufacturing firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a survey questionnaire using a sample of Thai food‐manufacturing firms. The three‐part questionnaire was mailed to managers performing food‐safety management activities in 480 firms. A total of 217 questionnaires were returned, with a response rate of 45.2 percent.

Findings

The results of hypothesis testing indicated that the adoption of a food safety management system can be significantly predicted by: expected gain of social legitimacy; expected gain of economic competitiveness; perceived importance of external stakeholders (government, community, food safety organizations, and media); top management commitment to food safety; firm size and amount of export sales. It can also be predicted by the extent to which firms exchange food safety knowledge with other stakeholders.

Practical implications

The results of the study suggest that the Government should formulate food safety policies in favour of educating senior managers in the potential benefits of food safety management systems for their firms. In addition it confirms the importance of Government information dissemination on the successful adoption of such systems and the need to focus Government resources on assisting smaller firms. The findings present evidence of the commercial benefits of system adoption.

Original/value

The paper identifies statistically significant factors that can “predict” the uptake of food safety management systems within the Thai food industry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Jon Kevin Loebbaka and Alfred Lewis

Safety management systems are created by firms to insure workplace safety while managing acceptable levels of risk. Global competition and the need to assimilate new…

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3355

Abstract

Purpose

Safety management systems are created by firms to insure workplace safety while managing acceptable levels of risk. Global competition and the need to assimilate new processes, materials, and technologies, have imparted a more immediate financial and societal imperative in identifying the firm's safety stakeholders. This research identifies a strategic framework to be used by organizations in managing their safety management systems and stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Management's ability to organize stakeholders' demands is central to prioritizing safety knowledge and channeling that knowledge effectively through the organization. Management's safety strategy dilemma can be condensed through the optic of a knowledge‐based decision cycle. The three‐stage decision cycle developed in this research asserts that setting safety strategy is simultaneously a knowledge management challenge for the firm and a process of identifying stakeholder salience.

Findings

The safety management system model presented classifies the organization's stakeholders critical to each stage of the strategy setting process. Clarifying stakeholders' power, legitimacy, and urgency is essential in prioritizing and developing those stakeholders' safety knowledge. This decision model should improve the prospect of managers implementing successful safety management system strategies.

Originality/value

The societal and financial costs of workplace safety management system failures diminish organization's effectiveness. This model provides a new approach to implementing knowledge based safety strategies from the organization's stakeholders.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

Martin Gibson and Jim Kidd

Whilst there are potential benefits to be gained from the consultative approach to the management of health and safety at work required by recent legislation, the actual…

Abstract

Whilst there are potential benefits to be gained from the consultative approach to the management of health and safety at work required by recent legislation, the actual implementation of such consultation is not without its problems. In particular the process of developing effective consultation may actually lead to conflict between participants. The process of implementation calls for careful management if the advantages of consultation are to be achieved.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Liang Wang and Yiming Cheng

The purpose of this paper was to map the safety management research of construction industry by scientometric analysis, which can predict important highlights and future…

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260

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to map the safety management research of construction industry by scientometric analysis, which can predict important highlights and future research directions of safety management research in the construction industry. As an important issue in the construction industry, safety management issues have been researched from different perspectives. Although previous studies make knowledge contributions to the safety management research of construction industry, there are still huge obstacles to distinguish the comprehensive knowledge map of safety management research in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies three scientometric analysis methods, collaboration network analysis, co-occurrence network analysis and cocitation network analysis, to the safety management research of construction industry. 5,406 articles were retrieved from the core collection database of the Web of Science. CiteSpace was used for constructing a comprehensive analysis framework to analyze and visualize the safety management research of construction industry. According to integrating the analysis results, a knowledge map for the safety management research of construction industry can be constructed.

Findings

The analysis results revealed the academic communities, key research topics and knowledge body of safety management research in the construction industry. The evolution paths of safety management research in the construction industry were divided into three development stages: “construction safety management”, “multi-objective safety management” and “comprehensive safety management”. Five research directions were predicted on the future safety management research of construction industry, including (1) comprehensive assessment indicators system; (2) intelligent safety management; (3) cross-organization collaboration of safety management; (4) multilevel safety behavior perception and (5) comparative analysis of safety climate.

Originality/value

The findings can reveal the overall status of safety management research in the construction industry and represent a high-quality knowledge body of safety management research in the construction industry that accurately reflects the comprehensive knowledge map on the safety management research of construction industry. The findings also predict important highlights and future research directions of safety management research in the construction industry, which will help researchers in the safety management research of construction industry for future collaboration and work.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2019

Yujie Cai

This chapter presents a theoretical framework of the industrial relations (IR) system in China’s coal mining industry, combining the roles of management organizations…

Abstract

This chapter presents a theoretical framework of the industrial relations (IR) system in China’s coal mining industry, combining the roles of management organizations, workers, and trade unions, as well as government agencies. It is one of the first empirical attempts to investigate the relationship between human resource (HR) practices, labor relations, and occupational safety in China’s coal mining industry over the past 60 years, based on the secondary data on coal mining accidents and case studies of two state-owned coal mines in a northern city in Anhui Province, China. The fluctuating occupational safety has been affected by government regulations over different time spans, marked by key political agendas, and by coal mining firms taking concrete measures to respond to these regulations, while exhibiting differing safety performance in state-owned versus township-and-village-owned mines. The field studies compared a safety-oriented to a cost-control-oriented HR and labor relations system, and their influences on safety performance. Coal mining firms and practitioners are advised to shift the traditional personnel management paradigm to a modern HR management system. In addition, although workers are often blamed directly for accidents, it is suggested that workers’ participation and voice in various processes of decision-making and policy implementation, and trade unions’ active involvement in protecting workers from occupational hazards, be encouraged.

Details

Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-192-6

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Qing-Wen Zhang, Heap-Yih Chong, Pin-Chao Liao and Yao-Lin Wan

This study aims to determine the influences of explanatory factors on the efficacy of the implementation of corporate safety policy (CSP) in international projects from…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine the influences of explanatory factors on the efficacy of the implementation of corporate safety policy (CSP) in international projects from the perspective of international contractors.

Design/methodology/approach

Four explanatory factors were identified for the implementation of CSP in international projects based on literature review. A questionnaire survey was then conducted among Chinese organizations that have been involved in international projects. In total, 121 valid responses were received from the questionnaire survey and were modeled using logistic regression to examine the impact of each factor on the observed event of interest.

Findings

The factors related to the effectiveness of implementing CSP, including “attitudes toward safety management measures (ASMM),” “operational mechanism for safety regulations (OM),” “safety knowledge management system (SKMS)” and “systematic safety training scheme (STS),” were selected. The results revealed that OM and SKMS were significant predictors (p < 0.05) of the odds of implementation satisfaction of CSP, but ASMM and STS were not. The probability of satisfactory CSP implementation increased as the value of SKMS increased, whereas the probability of unsatisfactory implementation improved as the value of OM increased.

Research limitations/implications

The questionnaire was distributed to respondents in international contractors headquartered in China. Other types of international organizations can be covered in future research. Furthermore, other factors, such as the local construction environment, should be considered in future studies.

Practical implications

The results provide new insights on CSP implementation overseas. Effective implementation of CSP contributes to the improvement of the safety performance of contractors. The practical significance of interpreting the influence factors is that the contractors can implement more efficient and targeted approaches and tools in the execution of their CSP. The impact of OM reminds safety managers of the synchronization of CSP as well as its implementation environment and characteristics. The effect of ASMM encourages contractors to adopt Web-based and digital knowledge management systems to improve the implementation efficiency of CSP.

Originality/value

The novelty of this study lies in the selection of factors and their impacts on CSP implementation in international projects. This study has also extended knowledge on normative safety in international projects based on quantitative modeling.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property…

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25698

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

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15651

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

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22444

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Property Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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