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1 – 10 of over 182000
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Figen Cakar, Umit S. Bititci and Jillian MacBryde

The initial objective of the research presented in this paper was to investigate human resource management (HRM) practices from a business process perspective. The paper…

21324

Abstract

The initial objective of the research presented in this paper was to investigate human resource management (HRM) practices from a business process perspective. The paper first demonstrates the level of inconsistency in the field with respect to HRM models. The paper then develops the need for a more formal systems engineering‐based approach for modelling HRM practices from a business process viewpoint. The paper then goes on to describe the model developed for the HRM business process together with the methodology used to validate the model. The paper concludes with a discussion on the validity of the model, which further demonstrates the differing points of view in this complex and multidisciplinary field.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Mathias Kirchmer

In the 1990s, companies focused on the design and implementation of their internal business processes to overcome functional barriers. The 2000s are about the integration…

3378

Abstract

In the 1990s, companies focused on the design and implementation of their internal business processes to overcome functional barriers. The 2000s are about the integration between enterprises and inter‐enterprise processes, particularly the improvement of supply chain management and customer relationship processes, The major enabler is the Internet, which has resulted in entire networks of e‐business processes across various organizations. To design and implement those processes efficiently and effectively, more and more organizations use available industry standards in the form of reference models, e.g. the supply chain reference model (SCOR), the RosettaNet Standards, or software reference models. Unclear for many enterprises is how to use those standards. This article describes a comprehensive methodology for the use of reference models, to design and implement inter‐enterprise collaborations within value chain networks. The methodology leads to fast and reliable results in value chain improvement. It increases the performance of the implementation procedure and the resulting business processes.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Zahir Irani, Vlatka Hlupic, Lynne P. Baldwin and Peter E.D. Love

Previous research suggests that developing dynamic models of business processes prior to their radical change could increase the success of BPR projects. Identifies…

2192

Abstract

Previous research suggests that developing dynamic models of business processes prior to their radical change could increase the success of BPR projects. Identifies barriers encountered in existing business processes and presents an overview of business process modelling methods that can be used to identify ways of eliminating these barriers. A case study is used to demonstrate how simulation modelling can be used to effectively re‐engineer manufacturing processes. The developed model is then manipulated, with results being generated to discover the possibilities of increasing the through‐put of the system. The usability of simulation modelling for evaluating alternative business process strategies is then investigated. Guidelines for achieving more widespread use of business process simulation are then proposed.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Wenhong Luo and Y. Alex Tung

The techniques for representing and analyzing business processes are referred to as business process modeling. Many business process modeling methods and their associated…

4292

Abstract

The techniques for representing and analyzing business processes are referred to as business process modeling. Many business process modeling methods and their associated tools have been used to capture the characteristics of business processes. However, most methods view business processes from different perspectives and have different features and capabilities. Thus, an important research question is how process designers should select appropriate modeling methods for their BPR initiatives. In this paper, we propose a framework for selecting business process modeling methods based on modeling objectives. This framework can serve as the basis for evaluating modeling methods and generating selection procedures. A general selection procedure is also described. We use an expense claim process as an example to illustrate the application of the selection procedure.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 99 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2008

Razvi Doomun and Nevin Vunka Jungum

The purpose of this paper is to develop a flexible framework through which business processes can be modelled, simulated and reengineered in a cost‐effective way.

6541

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a flexible framework through which business processes can be modelled, simulated and reengineered in a cost‐effective way.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is mainly based on a review of the literature and the methodology is discussed in the context of a typical call centre business.

Findings

Reengineering business processes involve changes in people, processes and technology over time. In this paper, a flexible business process modelling, simulation and reengineering (BPMSR) approach is presented. Modelling starts with precisely defining model objectives and boundaries, and carrying extensive data analysis. Simulation modelling allows testing and analysis of different scenarios to understand their impact on a broader “system” and evaluate feedback before moving forward with reengineering implementation plans. The need for a flexible and adaptive methodology is stressed to augment efficiency and effectiveness of reengineering cycle.

Originality/value

Flexibility and adaptability in the reengineering cycle are effective to identify early modelling incompatibility and simulation defects. It adds intelligence to BPMSR and accommodates for any technical or process changes that may subsequently arise. This approach is reliable for future process improvement or reengineering endeavours due to its flexible configuration, which can be adapted to both radical or incremental change.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Ali Fatolahi, Shahram Jalalinia, Zahra Dabestani and Masoumeh Eskandari

This paper seeks to offer a step‐by‐step methodology to extract and model business processes with a focus on business process decomposition. The main motivation is the…

1226

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to offer a step‐by‐step methodology to extract and model business processes with a focus on business process decomposition. The main motivation is the lack of repeatable measurable methods and techniques for extracting business process decomposition.

Design/methodology/approach

A step‐by‐step methodology for extracting business process models is provided. This methodology is called “the V methodology” because of its approach to break down the enterprise through a functional hierarchy and then collecting it up again via its process decomposition. Porter's value chain model is noticed as a powerful tool to complete the roadmap. The paper is designed using sections: benefits and necessities of having such a methodology, terminology, the V methodology, learned lessons and further work.

Findings

Success stories using the V methodology expressing its impact on quality business process models are mentioned. Experts find it useful to gain unified process models as well as helping them to discover gaps, bottlenecks and redundancies amongst business processes.

Research limitations/implications

It is too hard to receive reliable information about previous experiences from the working companies in the area.

Practical implications

The main implications found when using the V methodology are: practiced analysts feel it dangerous to their position, younger analysts use it as the only source of modeling and people find it difficult to apply Porter's model in practice.

Originality/value

Almost all of the previous papers refer to modeling notations when using the term “methodology”. This paper instead describes the process of business process modeling. Another original value of the paper would be using Porter's model to classify the processes within their right process groups.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

J.P. Briffaut and G. Saccone

Sustaining business performance in an ever changing economic and technical environment is a challenge to be addressed with relevant management implements. This goal can be…

2225

Abstract

Sustaining business performance in an ever changing economic and technical environment is a challenge to be addressed with relevant management implements. This goal can be achieved by using business modelling by processes allowing for costing deliverables, controlling operations and designing information sytems aligned with business procedures and organisation. It has to be stressed that the same process model can fulfill the three purposes above mentioned so that coherent views are secured for the various business stakeholders. In addition, adequate descriptions of business processes can “scavenge” the features of business assets such as organisation, personnel qualification, information systems to be taken into account in strategic decisions.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2022

Ahmet Coşkunçay and Onur Demirörs

From knowledge management point of view, business process models and ontologies are two essential knowledge artifacts for organizations that consume similar information…

Abstract

Purpose

From knowledge management point of view, business process models and ontologies are two essential knowledge artifacts for organizations that consume similar information sources. In this study, the PROMPTUM method for integrated process modeling and ontology development that adheres to well-established practices is presented. The method is intended to guide practitioners who develop both ontologies and business process models in the same or similar domains.

Design/methodology/approach

The method is supported by a recently developed toolset, which supports the modeling of relations between the ontologies and the labels within the process model collections. This study introduces the method and its companion toolset. An explanatory study, that includes two case studies, is designed and conducted to reveal and validate the benefits of using the method. Then, a follow-up semi-structured interview identifies the perceived benefits of the method.

Findings

Application of the method revealed several benefits including the improvements observed in the consistency and completeness of the process models and ontologies. The method is bringing the best practices in two domains together and guiding the use of labels within process model collections in ontology development and ontology resources in business process modeling.

Originality/value

The proposed method with its tool support is a pioneer in enabling to manage the labels and terms within the labels in process model collections consistently with ontology resources. Establishing these relations enables the definition and management of process model elements as resources in domain ontologies. Once the PROMPTUM method is utilized, a related resource is managed as a single resource representing the same real-world object in both artifacts. An explanatory study has shown that improvement in consistency and completeness of process models and ontologies is possible with integrated process modeling and ontology development.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2022

Rongjia Song, Weiping Cui, Jan Vanthienen, Lei Huang and Ying Wang

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the extant literature about the co-evolvement of Business Process Management (BPM) and the Internet of Things (IoT) by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the extant literature about the co-evolvement of Business Process Management (BPM) and the Internet of Things (IoT) by proposing the IoT-enabled Context-aware BPM (IoT-CaBPM) framework to bridge from the IoT infrastructure to context-aware business processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Motivated by the “Three Waves” of BPM research, IoT-enabled context-awareness is, therefore, expected to be achieved for enhancing the business process design, which pilots a new wave of BPR (Business Process Redesign/Reengineering) to enable the business process coevolve with IoT and analytics. This paper reports an illustrative case study of BPR in a Chinese bulk port, one of the hub seaports that widely adopted IoT technologies over the last few years.

Findings

The IoT implementation and data analytics has increased the efficiency and improve the monitoring effectively. The proposed IoT-CaBPM framework availably helps to identify and match nodes of IoT devices, business decisions and analytic models in order to redesign a business process towards context-aware variability. As IoT is rapidly becoming the new dominant IT paradigm is moving towards mature implementation in various industries, the corresponding BPR must be planned and executed strategically for achieving better benefits.

Originality/value

Despite some research extend BPM standard by integrating IoT devices as a sort of resources or report generically that the ports operations are affected by IoT, there is still a lack of layers from the IoT infrastructure to context-aware business processes. An industrial BPR case with business models in detail is also a lack for presenting the specific implications and effectiveness of the adoption of such technologies. This paper fills in this gap.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Pekka Huovinen

An issue of managing a business (unit) as a whole successfully is perceived to belong to the fundamental issues within strategic management. This paper proposes that a…

Abstract

An issue of managing a business (unit) as a whole successfully is perceived to belong to the fundamental issues within strategic management. This paper proposes that a business unit can be managed successfully in short and longer term in its focal contexts as a set of three recursive, competence-based, and process-based systems. Many elements of Stafford Beer's (1985) viable system model along the key competence-based theoretical bases are applied to this system design task. The outcome is an ideal, recursive template for advancing competence-based business management (CBBM) and its conceptual modeling. It is assumed that it is possible to design a business unit as a viable system that is capable of sustaining a separate existence at only three levels of hierarchy, as part of single or multi-business firms. Business-process models and their redesign processes are chosen as the 2nd-order, focal system which produces a business unit's competitiveness and solves longitudinal CBBM problems. One level of recursion down includes a unit's value creating, capturing, releveraging, and respective processes that enable to solve cross-sectional problems. One level of recursion up includes a unit's existential foresights and their crafting processes that solve existential problems. Recursivity is designed inside each system in terms of three kinds of subsystems for (a) primary value releveraging, process-model redesign, and business-foresight crafting, (b) the management of varieties in releveraging, modeling, and foreseeing, and (c) the monitoring and probing of all three systems. Systemic competences are incorporated inside respective systems. Such competences possess three flexibilities of absorption, attenuation, and amplification. At each level of recursion, a competence-based process is a unit of conceptual modeling of CBBM. A business unit is defined as a set of its purposeful processes. No thing or one is left outside them. Viability is ensured by real-time interaction and the 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-order feedback loops between three systems. Overall, the suggested, recursive, 3-system template is intended to serve future, compatible modeling efforts among interested, pioneering firms, professional CBBM modelers, scholars, and alike. Its novelty is produced by choosing and designing the CBBM modeling as the 2nd-order system-in-focus with its two recursions, by designing and using systemic, competence-based processes as the units of conceptualization, and by choosing and drawing the figures to illustrate the 3-system template in the ways that allow also business managers comprehend and apply the suggested template in practice.

Details

A Focussed Issue on Identifying, Building, and Linking Competences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-990-9

1 – 10 of over 182000