Search results

1 – 10 of over 17000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Kathleen Abrahamson, Rangaraj Ramanujam and James G. Anderson

Previous research indicates that nurses' safetyclimate perceptions are influenced by individual nurse characteristics, leadership, staffing levels and workplace…

Downloads
726

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research indicates that nurses' safetyclimate perceptions are influenced by individual nurse characteristics, leadership, staffing levels and workplace structure. No literature was identified that explored the relationship between nurses' safety climate perceptions and staffing composition in a particular hospital unit. This paper aims to fill some of the gaps in the research in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

Data supplied by 430 registered nurses working in two Midwestern US hospitals were analyzed to co‐worker characteristics such as education, licensure, experience and full‐ or part‐time status.

Findings

Registered nurses working in hospitals with proportionally more‐experienced nurses perceived their workplaces to be significantly safer for patients. Surprisingly, co‐worker licensure, education and full‐ or part‐time status did not significantly influence nurses' safety climate perceptions.

Practical implications

Findings indicate that safetyclimate perceptions vary significantly between hospital units and experienced nurses may act as a resource that promotes a positive safety climate. Hospitals retaining experienced nurses may potentially reduce errors.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that the results highlight the importance of providing nurses with an environment that encourages retention and creates a workplace where experienced nurses' skills are best utilized.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2021

Divine Tuinese Novieto

Encouraging employee's safety behaviour remains a challenge in the construction industry from developing countries. Several studies have examined the nexus between safety

Abstract

Purpose

Encouraging employee's safety behaviour remains a challenge in the construction industry from developing countries. Several studies have examined the nexus between safety climate and safety behaviour. This paper investigates the psychological ownership as a mediator in the relationship between safety climate and occupational safety behaviours among construction professionals in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional design was used for the study. Two hundred and eighty-two respondents (282) took part in the study by completing an online survey. The respondents were selected using a convenience sample technique. Data were processed using IBM SPSS version 21. The results were analysed using PLS-SEM.

Findings

Results of the study reveal that safety climate positively predicts construction professional's safety behaviour and psychological ownership. Furthermore, psychological ownership was found to (1) predict occupational safety behaviour and (2) mediate the nexus of safety climate and occupational safety behaviour.

Practical implications

Managers should continuously implement far-reaching policies that would promote healthy workplace safety climate and feeling of ownership among construction professionals.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the pioneers to have tested a model including safety climate, occupational safety behaviour and psychological ownership in a constructional profession.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Stephanie A. Andel, Derek M. Hutchinson and Paul E. Spector

The modern workplace contains many physical and interpersonal hazards to employee physical and psychological health/well-being. This chapter integrates the literatures on…

Abstract

The modern workplace contains many physical and interpersonal hazards to employee physical and psychological health/well-being. This chapter integrates the literatures on occupational safety (i.e., accidents and injuries) and mistreatment (physical violence and psychological abuse). A model is provided linking environmental (climate and leadership), individual differences (demographics and personality), motivation, behavior, and outcomes. It notes that some of the same variables have been linked to both safety and mistreatment, such as safety climate, mistreatment climate, conscientiousness, and emotional stability.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-016-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2020

Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah, Akosua Konadu Boateng and Samuel Doku Tetteh

This study examined the relationship between safety climate and employees' voluntary work behaviours (i.e. organisational citizenship behaviour and counterproductive work…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the relationship between safety climate and employees' voluntary work behaviours (i.e. organisational citizenship behaviour and counterproductive work behaviour). It also examined the moderating role of employees' voice on the relationship between safety climate and employees' voluntary work behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the quantitative survey research design, data were collected from 220 respondents from three manufacturing companies in Accra, Ghana. Pearson's correlation test (r) and hierarchical multiple regression were used for data analysis.

Findings

Results showed that safety climate plays a significant role in predicting employees' voluntary work behaviours. Also, employees' voice was found to moderate the relationship between safety climate and organisational citizenship behaviour but does not moderate the relationship between safety climate and counterproductive work behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Data was collected from manufacturing firms in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana; hence, the findings may be limited to just the manufacturing industry in the Ghanaian setting.

Originality/value

This paper positions safety climate as a catalyst for positive voluntary work behaviours in the workplace and an antidote to negative workplace behaviours. It also highlights the role of employees' voice in enhancing positive voluntary workplace behaviours of employees.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Mohmaed Almazrouei, Khalizani Khalid and Ross Davidson

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a safety climate scale for measuring the safety climate in the oil and gas industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a safety climate scale for measuring the safety climate in the oil and gas industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The scale developed through conducting a literature review about the safety climate and constructing a question pool. The number of items was reduced to 51 after performing a screening process. Explanatory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were performed to examine the scale’s construct validity.

Findings

CFA loadings were statistically significant. All Cronbach’s alpha (a) and composite reliability values support the construct reliability. The outcomes showed acceptable convergent and discriminant validity: AVEs showed acceptable values, and the square roots of AVE values showed higher values than the construct correlation values. Furthermore, all factor loadings exceeded 0.50, and the t-values were statistically significant. CFA loadings were statistically significant.

Originality/value

The safety climate measuring scale of 43-instrument items produced in this study is reliable and valid for the oil and gas industry.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Helen Lingard, Rita Peihua Zhang and David Oswald

The leadership style and communication practices of supervisors in the Australian construction industry were measured. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

Downloads
1400

Abstract

Purpose

The leadership style and communication practices of supervisors in the Australian construction industry were measured. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of leadership style and communication practices of Australian construction supervisors on workgroup health and safety (H&S) climate and behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was administered to members of 20 workgroups engaged in rail construction work on the Level Crossing Removal Project and the Melbourne Metro Tunnel Project in Victoria, Australia. The survey measured components of supervisors’ transformational and transactional leadership, communication practices, the group H&S climate and workers’ self-reported H&S compliance and participation.

Findings

Supervisors’ transformational and transactional leadership, as well as communication practices, were all positively and significantly correlated with group H&S climate and workers’ self-reported H&S behaviours. The transformational leadership component of providing an appropriate model was the strongest predictor of H&S participation, while H&S compliance was predicted by the transactional leadership component of providing contingent reward, as well as supervisors’ communication practices. H&S climate fully mediated the relationship between supervisory leadership and workers’ self-reported H&S behaviour.

Originality/value

The research demonstrates that both transformational and transactional supervisory leadership are important in the construction context. Effective communication between supervisors and workers is also important for H&S. The findings suggest that supervisory leadership development programmes may be an effective way to improve H&S performance in predominantly subcontracted construction workgroups.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Morten Birkeland Nielsen, Jarle Eid, Kathryn Mearns and Gerry Larsson

This study aims to examine how authentic leadership relates to risk perception in safety critical organizations (SCOs). It is hypothesized that authentic leaders influence…

Downloads
3951

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how authentic leadership relates to risk perception in safety critical organizations (SCOs). It is hypothesized that authentic leaders influence risk perception through the mediating effect of safety climate.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a survey design, the variables were assessed in a cross‐sectional sample of 293 offshore oil installation workers from a single company.

Findings

The authors’ findings show that follower ratings of authentic leadership are negatively related to risk perception and positively associated with ratings of safety climate. Controlling for personality characteristics and leadership responsibility among respondents, the results confirm the hypothesis in that safety climate mediates the relationship between authentic leadership and risk perception. Safety climate had the strongest relationship with risk perception when assessed as a higher order construct.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to investigate the relationship between authentic leadership and safety. The results indicate that authentic leadership and safety climate are important factors that relate to risk perception in SCOs. The authors’ findings suggest that SCOs should consider recruiting and developing authentic leaders to foster positive safety climates and risk management.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 December 2017

Chin-Shan Lu, Hsiang-Kai Weng and Chih-Wen Lee

Container terminal operation is one of the most risky industries. Many of the accidents that occurred were found to be caused by human errors. However, it seems relatively…

Downloads
1492

Abstract

Purpose

Container terminal operation is one of the most risky industries. Many of the accidents that occurred were found to be caused by human errors. However, it seems relatively little research has been conducted to examine the influence of leader-member exchange (LMX) relationship on employee safety behavior. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine the effects of leader-member exchange and safety climate on employees’ safety organizational citizenship behaviors (SOCB) in the container terminal context based on the social exchange theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A structural equation modeling was used with confirmatory factor analysis, and survey data are collected from 265 employees in major container terminals in Taiwan.

Findings

Results indicated that LMX is positively associated with safety climate, whereas safety climate positively influences employees’ safety citizenship behavior. Specifically, results indicated that safety climate mediates the effect of LMX on employees’ SOCB.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to LMX dimensions adapted from the studies of Li and Liao (2014) and Vidyarthiv et al. (2014). Future research could examine the linkages between LMX, ethical climate, safety performance and supervisor leadership influence. Furthermore, this research focused specifically on employees from the container terminal operators in Taiwan. It would be valuable to collect data from employees from other countries to obtain a balanced view of the relationship between LMX, team-member exchange (TMX), safety climate and employee SOCB in container terminal operations.

Practical implications

This research provides a useful implication for container terminal operators to enhance LMX qualities and employee safety behavior through organizational participation, employee-helping behaviors and informing workers to obey safety rule and regulation.

Originality/value

Given the prevalence of accidents and unsafe behavior in container terminal operations, this research sought to examine the relationships among LMX, safety climate and employee SOCB in the container terminal context. Theoretically, this study highlights the importance of LMX and safety climate in explaining the SOCB of employees.

Details

Maritime Business Review, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-3757

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Rita Peihua Zhang, Payam Pirzadeh, Helen Lingard and Steve Nevin

The purpose of this paper is to use a longitudinal approach to measure safety climate at construction projects, and explore the relationship between safety climate and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use a longitudinal approach to measure safety climate at construction projects, and explore the relationship between safety climate and the level of project completion in the dynamic construction project environments.

Design/methodology/approach

Multi-wave safety climate surveys were conducted at four processing plant construction projects in New Zealand. Safety climate was measured with a multi-level measurement instrument, which measured construction workers’ perceptions of client’s organisational safety response (COSR), principal contractor’s organisational safety response (PCOSR), supervisors’ safety response (SSR) and co-workers’ safety response (CWSR).

Findings

At the organisational level, the research identifies a general downward change trend in workers’ perceptions of COSR and PCOSR. At the group level, no clear or consistent change trend is identified between the level of project completion and workers’ perceptions of SSR and CWSR.

Research limitations/implications

The research suggests that the construction project management should consistently emphasise the importance of safety, even when they are facing production pressure. The research highlights the opportunity to examine the role of supervisors’ leadership as an antecedent to the group-level safety climate and the development of workers’ safety concerns for their co-workers over time.

Originality/value

This research provides the starting point for understanding safety climate in the dynamic and constantly changing construction project environments, in which the relative priorities change, adverse events arise and production pressures fluctuate over time.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 July 2018

Mohammad Tanvi Newaz, Peter Rex Davis, Marcus Jefferies and Manikam Pillay

Safety climate and its impact on safety performance is well established; however, researchers in this field suggest that the absence of a common assessment framework is a…

Downloads
1166

Abstract

Purpose

Safety climate and its impact on safety performance is well established; however, researchers in this field suggest that the absence of a common assessment framework is a reflection of the state of development of this concept. The purpose of this paper is to propose a five-factor model that can be used to diagnose and measure safety climate in construction safety research and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was adopted, and following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, 574 articles were selected at the start of the study based on a developed review protocol for investigating safety climate factors. While examining the factor analysis of different studies, data reliability and data validity of the individual research findings were considered and frequency of factors uploaded was used to determine the significance as a quantitative measure to develop the ranking of safety climate factors.

Findings

The review identified that, from the established measures of safety climate in construction, there is little uniformity on factor importance. However, management commitment safety system role of the supervisor; workers’ involvement and group safety climate were found to be the most common across the studies reviewed. It is proposed these factors are used to inform a five-factor model for investigating safety climate in the construction industry.

Originality/value

The findings of this study will motivate researchers and practitioners in safety to use the five-factor safety climate model presented in this paper and test it to develop a common factor structure for the construction industry. The fact that the model is comprised of five factors makes it easier to be used and implemented by small-to medium-sized construction companies, therefore enhancing its potential use.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 17000