Search results

1 – 10 of 56
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1993

Rosemary Gibson and Sally Watson

Points out that it is difficult to work learning directly with anorganization′s strategic goals and needs. Reports on Scotland′s CentralRegional Council′s approach which suggests…

554

Abstract

Points out that it is difficult to work learning directly with an organization′s strategic goals and needs. Reports on Scotland′s Central Regional Council′s approach which suggests that strategic goals and needs should be examined before a learning programme can be implemented. This is done by the Development Needs Analysis (DNA). Lists the subsequent benefits of DNA.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1993

Rosemary Harrison, Susan Miller and Anthony Gibson

The second part of a two‐part article, the first part of whichdescribed the clinical directors′ management devel‐opment programmedesigned and run during 1991‐93 by the Northern…

518

Abstract

The second part of a two‐part article, the first part of which described the clinical directors′ management devel‐opment programme designed and run during 1991‐93 by the Northern Health Authority and Durham University Business School. Focuses on the second, action learning, period of the course. Describes the action learning model used in the programme, includes a member′s description of his set′s experiences, and draws conclusions about the programme′s reception and achievements.

Details

Executive Development, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-3230

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Liz Gordon

– The purpose of this paper is to highlight and report on women's work during and after the Christchurch earthquakes.

564

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight and report on women's work during and after the Christchurch earthquakes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports findings of some of a large number of life history interviews conducted with Christchurch women in 2012.

Findings

Three specific sets of roles for women are identified, arising from the interviews that were undertaken. The first role is in keeping families together, meeting a range of diverse family needs and supporting all family members. The second role is in working with, and leading, post-quake services to offer disaster relief. Finally, a third role is in working in a range of ways to engage with and beautify communities and improve their lives.

Practical implications

Women's work is often unseen in the post-earthquake environment. But this lack of visibility should not imply that women are not active in earthquake recovery.

Originality/value

As far as the authors are aware, this is the first life history study of women undertaken to understand the impact of the earthquakes on their lives.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Silvia Ines Monserrat and Claire A. Simmers

In 1979, Rosemary Pledger became the first female President of the Academy of Management (AOM). AOM, through scholarship and teaching about management and organizations, is well…

Abstract

Purpose

In 1979, Rosemary Pledger became the first female President of the Academy of Management (AOM). AOM, through scholarship and teaching about management and organizations, is well known for its contributions to the development of modern management theory. The purpose of this paper is to understand and analyze the human and social influencers which enabled Pledger’s career success. She climbed to the top of her profession and became a role model for other professional women, especially in the academic field; she successfully cracked the glass ceiling.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a qualitative methodology as most appropriate to examine the research question of how Pledger used human and social skills to overcome barriers to career success. In addition to her biographical data, the authors analyzed 1,593 pages of documents from the AOM Archives at the Khell Center, Martin P. Catherwood Library, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.

Findings

Pledger succeeded because she developed strong human and social capital critical for career success and career mobility. Becoming part of the top management team in three organizations – the AOM, the Southwestern AOM and the University of Houston – Clear Lake City is evidence of her skill in using her capital to crack the glass ceiling.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of author interpretation of secondary data is recognized.

Practical implications

This work illustrates the appropriateness of qualitative research, specifically, in placing important management figures in context, and it makes clear how human and social capital factors are critical to career success for women.

Originality/value

AOM’s contribution to the development of modern management theory is widely recognized; however, there is a lack of studies related to the career successes of AOM’s female leaders. This paper chronicles the career life of Rosemary Pledger who became the first female president of the AOM and a successful Dean and examines the factors that contributed to her career success despite the presence of a glass ceiling.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Lessons in Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-253-5

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Sacha Evans, Faisil Sethi, Oliver Dale, Clive Stanton, Rosemary Sedgwick, Monica Doran, Lucinda Shoolbred, Steve Goldsack and Rex Haigh

The purpose of this paper is to describe the evolution of the field of personality disorder since the publication of “Personality disorder: no longer a diagnosis of exclusion” in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the evolution of the field of personality disorder since the publication of “Personality disorder: no longer a diagnosis of exclusion” in 2003.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of both the academic literature contained within relevant databases alongside manual searches of policy literature and guidance from the key stakeholders was undertaken.

Findings

The academic and policy literature concentrates on treating borderline and antisocial personality disorders. It seems unlikely that evidence will resolutely support any one treatment modality over another. Criticism has arisen that comparison between modalities misses inter and intra patient heterogeneity and the measurement of intervention has become conflated with overall service design and the need for robust care pathways. Apparent inconsistency in service availability remains, despite a wealth of evidence demonstrating the availability of cost-effective interventions and the significant inequality of social and health outcomes for this population.

Research limitations/implications

The inclusion of heterogeneous sources required pragmatic compromises in methodological rigour.

Originality/value

This paper charts the recent developments in the field with a wealth of wide-ranging evidence and robust guidance from institutions such as NICE. The policy literature has supported the findings of this evidence but current clinical practice and what patients and carers can expect from services remains at odds. This paper lays bare the disparity between what we know and what is being delivered. The authors argue for the need for greater research into current practice to inform the setting of minimum standards for the treatment of personality disorder.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1918

The Milk (Amendment) Order, 1917, which came into force on December 31st, provides that milk shall be sold retail only by Imperial measure; that no colouring matter shall be added…

Abstract

The Milk (Amendment) Order, 1917, which came into force on December 31st, provides that milk shall be sold retail only by Imperial measure; that no colouring matter shall be added to milk or cream intended for sale; that no milk to which any water has been added shall knowingly be sold or offered for sale; that no person may use for the purpose of his trade any milk can or milk bottle which bears the name, trade name, trade mark, or trade device of some person other than himself or his employer, except with the consent of such person. The Order contains a new clause, in substitution for Clauses 4 and 6 of the Milk Order, 1917 (which are revoked), providing that where milk is sold wholesale by or on behalf of any person other than the producer the maximum prices chargeable shall, unless otherwise determined, pursuant to the Order, be as follows:—

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Rosemary C. Reilly

This chapter details the instructional experiences of a group of graduate students, who are emerging Human Systems Intervention practitioners – men and women who self-identify as…

Abstract

This chapter details the instructional experiences of a group of graduate students, who are emerging Human Systems Intervention practitioners – men and women who self-identify as white and work in organizational, community, and educational leadership settings. I outline a series of learning experiences that supported a group of MA students to uncover white supremacist thinking in their work – their approaches to intervention and their mental models regarding effective organizational or community functioning. Using contemplative practices to dig out oppressive, invisible dimensions of white identity, we examined how our whiteness shaped and warped how we enacted our work in community and organization development. We did this by reflective reading, meditation, contemplative arts, deep listening and storytelling, singing and music, and ceremony. This chapter illustrates how higher education can address a fundamental mental model and world view that influences how social responsibility is envisioned and how issues of social justice can be advanced within graduate professional education through socially responsible teaching and learning strategies and activities.

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Alan Day

21

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 11 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Enakshi Sengupta, Patrick Blessinger and Craig Mahoney

There has been growing concern among international agencies and the corporate world regarding the question of sustainability and how long we can preserve our planet and ensure…

Abstract

There has been growing concern among international agencies and the corporate world regarding the question of sustainability and how long we can preserve our planet and ensure just and balanced development for all. Non-governmental organizations, labor leaders, faith-based organizations, religious leaders, and other civil society representatives play a crucial and diverse set of roles in societal development. At the same time, institutions imparting higher education are engaging in debates and quality research work to gauge the need of our current generation with a vision to meet the need of the future generation. Such lofty dreams can only be achieved if we respect the natural systems and the international standards designed to protect the core social and environmental values. Sustainability education is becoming crucial, mainly for students so that they are aware of concepts such as economic prosperity, resource equity, energy uses, and environmental health and concerns (Sengupta, Blessinger, & Yamin, 2019). In this context, the role of higher education along with civil society is critical. Being a part of society, they need to contribute by addressing the common problems so that they make our younger generations aware of the issues and help them create and flourish in an environment and ecosystem which is healthy. There has been a growing appetite among the educational institutions to receive information, examples, and case studies mainly from the environmental and economic perspective which could help the faculty to impart knowledge to the students. The purpose of this book is to explore different angles from sustainability corporate social responsibility and the role of civil society in the context of education. The chapters in this book gives us an insight into the prevalent literature as well talk about interventions and case studies that have contributed toward the growth of this genre. This book will help in reorienting curriculum, develop programs and modules, implement innovative teaching methods, and integrate such topics in their educational programs.

Details

Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum and Teaching Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-464-4

Keywords

1 – 10 of 56