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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Fernanda Mata, Pedro S.R. Martins, Julia B. Lopes-Silva, Marcela Mansur-Alves, Alexander Saeri, Emily Grundy, Peter Slattery and Liam Smith

This study aimed to examine (1) whether confidence in political and health authorities predicted intention to adopt recommended health-protective behaviours and (2…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to examine (1) whether confidence in political and health authorities predicted intention to adopt recommended health-protective behaviours and (2) whether age, gender and education level moderated the relationship between confidence in political and health authorities and health protective-behaviours (download the COVIDSafe app, wear a face mask and stay at home).

Design/methodology/approach

This study assessed 1,206 Australians using an online survey. Participants answered questions regarding their confidence in political and health authorities and intention to adopt health-protective measures.

Findings

Confidence in health and political authorities predicted intention to stay home and intention to download the COVIDSafe app, but not to wear a face mask in public spaces. Age moderated the relationship between confidence in authorities and intention to stay home (i.e. among respondents with less than 54 years old, confidence in authorities was associated with higher intention to stay home). Further, age and education level moderated the relationship between confidence in authorities and intention to download the COVIDSafe app (i.e. among older respondents and those with a university degree or higher, confidence in authorities was more strongly associated with higher intention to download the COVIDSafe app). The interaction between confidence and education predicted adoption of mask-wearing (i.e. among participants with a university degree or higher, more confidence in authorities was associated with higher intention to wear a mask in public spaces).

Originality/value

Our findings can inform the development of targeted communications to increase health-protective behaviours at early stages of future pandemics.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 41 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Robert McMaster

The programme of market‐oriented reforms to the UK’s welfare state commenced during the 1980s with the implementation of the competitive tendering of certain defined…

Abstract

The programme of market‐oriented reforms to the UK’s welfare state commenced during the 1980s with the implementation of the competitive tendering of certain defined activities in health and local authorities. This paper argues that mainstream economic analysis offers only a very partial analysis of this policy; merely reducing investigation to a comparison of costs across alternative governance arrangements. It is contended that the old institutionalist account of institutional change provides a richer anaytical vein. The paper concisely applies this in a survey of 21 authorities. Results indicate that the policy engendered change in the values correlating behaviour by partially supressing established welfarist values. There was also some deterioration in trust between parties with the formalisation of relationships, although this varied between health and local authorities. The new contracting environment and decline in staff morale may have contributed to increased rigidities.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1980

The terms are not synonymous; their differences are mainly of function and areas of administration. Community Health is used in national health service law; environmental…

Abstract

The terms are not synonymous; their differences are mainly of function and areas of administration. Community Health is used in national health service law; environmental health to describe the residuum of health functions remaining with local authorities after the first NHS/Local Government reorganization of 1974. Previously, they were all embraced in the term public health, known for a century or more, with little attention to divisions and in the field of administration, all local authority between county and district councils. In the dichotomy created by the reorganization, the personal health services, including the ambulance service, may have dove‐tailed into the national health service, but for the remaining functions, there was a situation of unreality, which has persisted. It is difficult to know where community health and environmental health begin and end. From the outside, the unreality may be more apparent than real. The Royal Commission on the NHS in their Report of last year state that leaving environmental health services with local authorities “does not seem to have caused any problems”—and this, despite the disparity in status of the area health authority and the bottom tier, local councils.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 82 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Richard A.E. North, Jim P. Duguid and Michael A. Sheard

Describes a study to measure the quality of service provided by food‐poisoning surveillance agencies in England and Wales in terms of the requirements of a representative…

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Abstract

Describes a study to measure the quality of service provided by food‐poisoning surveillance agencies in England and Wales in terms of the requirements of a representative consumer ‐ the egg producing industry ‐ adopting “egg associated” outbreak investigation reports as the reference output. Defines and makes use of four primary performance indicators: accessibility of information; completeness of evidence supplied in food‐poisoning outbreak investigation reports as to the sources of infection in “egg‐associated” outbreaks; timeliness of information published; and utility of information and advice aimed at preventing or controlling food poisoning. Finds that quality expectations in each parameter measured are not met. Examines reasons why surveillance agencies have not delivered the quality demanded. Makes use of detailed case studies to illustrate inadequacies of current practice. Attributes failure to deliver “accessibility” to a lack of recognition on the status or nature of “consumers”, combined with a self‐maintenance motivation of the part of the surveillance agencies. Finds that failures to deliver “completeness” and “utility” may result from the same defects which give rise to the lack of “accessibility” in that, failing to recognize the consumers of a public service for what they are, the agencies feel no need to provide them with the data they require. The research indicates that self‐maintenance by scientific epidemiologists may introduce biases which when combined with a politically inspired need to transfer responsibility for food‐poisoning outbreaks, skew the conduct of investigations and their conclusions. Contends that this is compounded by serious and multiple inadequacies in the conduct of investigations, arising at least in part from the lack of training and relative inexperience of investigators, the whole conditioned by interdisciplinary rivalry between the professional groups staffing the different agencies. Finds that in addition failures to exploit or develop epidemiological technologies has affected the ability of investigators to resolve the uncertainties identified. Makes recommendations directed at improving the performance of the surveillance agencies which, if adopted will substantially enhance food poisoning control efforts.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 98 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2007

Anna Coleman

What difference is the operation of local authority health scrutiny making to the oversight and democratisation of decision making by health bodies? This article provides…

Abstract

What difference is the operation of local authority health scrutiny making to the oversight and democratisation of decision making by health bodies? This article provides an insight into how a group of local authorities in England tackled the operation of a specific joint health scrutiny committee. This example highlights building relations with associated health bodies and other local authorities, choice of health scrutiny agenda, ways of working, capacity of committees, ambiguities within the policy itself, and the difficulties and challenges of adding meaningful democratic oversight to the decision‐making processes of NHS bodies. This review highlights some of the benefits of health scrutiny, but suggests that engaging more fully with patients and the public in such reviews could result in a more influential and inclusive process.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Ian S. Watt, Nick Freemantle and James Mason

The purchasing role of health authorities has been in existence for twoyears and public health physicians are expected to play a central partwithin this role. While the…

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363

Abstract

The purchasing role of health authorities has been in existence for two years and public health physicians are expected to play a central part within this role. While the first year was dedicated to maintaining a “steady state”, differences are now appearing between authorities in the way in which purchasing is managed. Based on the views of senior managers and public health physicians working in purchasing authorities, considers how the purchasing process is developing and reports how public health medicine is perceived to be contributing to it. Identifies sub‐regional resource allocation as a major factor influencing the purchasing process. Conflicting views were found on the purchasing role of public health medicine, in particular with respect to health needs assessment. As purchasing evolves it remains unclear whether public health medicine will come to fulfil a largely technical role, or a more wider one in which it acts as advocate for the population′s health.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Anna Coleman and Stephen Harrison

The purpose of this paper is to consider the possible implications for health scrutiny in England of changes being made/consulted upon resulting from the Health and Social…

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137

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the possible implications for health scrutiny in England of changes being made/consulted upon resulting from the Health and Social Care Act 2012.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of the Health and Social Care Act 2012, associated secondary legislation and a review of the existing literature on health scrutiny over the last 10 years.

Findings

Health scrutiny legislation is in need of review, especially since the changes to the health care system introduced by the recent Health and Social Care Act 2012. The Department of Health has recently consulted on possible changes to be implemented from April 2013. If health scrutiny can become embedded in local commissioning processes, there is potential for health services appropriate to local populations to be more effectively provided within the current financially challenging environment.

Originality/value

Little has been written on health scrutiny in recent years. This article looks at the potential impacts on and opportunities for health scrutiny under the Health and Social Care Act 2012.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2020

Linda Somerville, Betsy Thom and Rachel Herring

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of Public Health in licensing following The Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act of 2011, which added ‘health

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of Public Health in licensing following The Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act of 2011, which added ‘health bodies’ as responsible authorities in licensing; in practice, Directors of Public Health undertook this role in England. Despite this legislation facilitating the inclusion of public health in partnerships around licensing, wide variations in involvement levels by public health professionals persist.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the findings from interviews that explored the experiences of public health professionals engaging with local established partnerships around alcohol licensing. Qualitative data were collected through 21 interviews in a purposeful sample of London boroughs. These data were combined with analyses of relevant area documentation and observations of 14 licensing sub-committee meetings in one London borough over a seven-month period. Thematic analysis of all data sources was conducted to identify emerging themes.

Findings

This study highlighted the importance of successful navigation of the “contested space” (Hunter and Perkins, 2014) surrounding both public health practice and licensing partnerships. In some instances, contested spaces were successfully negotiated and public health departments achieved an increased level of participation within the partnership. Ultimately, improvements in engagement levels of public health teams within licensing could be achieved.

Originality/value

The paper explores a neglected aspect of research around partnership working and highlights the issues arising when a new partner attempts to enter an existing partnership.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Brenda Leese and Roland Petchey

Personal medical services pilots were introduced in England in 1998 to provide increased flexibility to general practitioners practising in deprived areas, to improve…

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288

Abstract

Personal medical services pilots were introduced in England in 1998 to provide increased flexibility to general practitioners practising in deprived areas, to improve service provision and reduce inequalities. The aim of this study was to identify health authority perspectives of the achievements of their pilots. Less than half of the health authorities agreed that their pilots’ original objectives had been completely achieved. Support, commitment and enthusiasm from within and outside the pilots, and the ability to be flexible, were helpful in promoting change management. Obstacles were financial difficulties and a lack of understanding of personal medical services. The opinion was that personal medical services had made a highly regarded contribution to the local health economy, especially in the provision of new services and the promotion of new staff roles. The results provide lessons for primary care organisations in England and elsewhere in terms of the factors required to successfully implement change.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1988

David J. Jukes

A comprehensive description of food law enforcement in England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland is presented. The history of food law is described together with…

Abstract

A comprehensive description of food law enforcement in England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland is presented. The history of food law is described together with the probable consequences of future EEC legislation on the UK situation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 90 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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