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1 – 10 of 11
Article
Publication date: 26 August 2021

Isaac Wanzige Magoola, Rogers Mwesigwa and Ruth Nabwami

The purpose of this paper is to provide the initial evidence of the relationship between the community and public-private partnership (PPP) projects by focusing on community…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide the initial evidence of the relationship between the community and public-private partnership (PPP) projects by focusing on community engagement, trust and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is cross sectional and correlational and it uses project level data that were collected by means of a questionnaire from a sample of 47 PPP projects in Uganda.

Findings

Results indicate that trust and community engagement are significantly associated with the performance of PPP projects.

Research limitations/implications

This study was cross-sectional, and thus monitoring changes in behaviour over time was not possible. The study used a quantitative research approach and this limits respondents from expressing their feelings fully. The study was conducted in Uganda and it is possible that the results of this study can be generalized to developing countries with environments similar to that of Uganda.

Practical implications

The results are important for PPP projects to understand the role that trust and community engagement play in as far as the performance of PPP projects is concerned.

Originality/value

Whilst there have been a number of studies on the performance of PPP projects, this study provides initial empirical evidence on the influence of trust and community engagement on the performance of PPP projects using evidence from PPP projects of an African developing economy – Uganda.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Rogers Mwesigwa, Ruth Nabwami, Joseph Mayengo and Gonzaga Basulira

The purpose of this study is to examine whether contractual completeness is a cornerstone to stakeholder management in Public–Private Partnership (PPP) projects in Uganda.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine whether contractual completeness is a cornerstone to stakeholder management in Public–Private Partnership (PPP) projects in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a cross-sectional and quantitative approach. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire survey from a sample of 103 PPP projects in Uganda. Partial Least squares structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The study found that contractual completeness dimensions (contractual obligatoriness, contingency adaptability, issue inclusiveness, term specificity) are all significantly and positively associated with stakeholder management in PPP projects in Uganda.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few studies on stakeholder management in PPP projects from a developing country’s perspective, thus contributing to scanty literature on how to manage stakeholders in PPP projects.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to the relationship between contract completeness dimensions and stakeholder management in PPP projects in Uganda. Future studies should be conducted on other factors that affect stakeholder management in PPP projects in Uganda.

Practical implications

Our results imply that when all the relevant issues are included in the contract, contract terms are explicitly stipulated, all the unanticipated changes are described and when all the parties involved are restrained by a binding force of a contract, conflicts and opportunism reduces and stakeholders concerns are addressed.

Article
Publication date: 17 December 2021

Bob Ssekiziyivu, Rogers Mwesigwa, Eunice Kabahinda, Sharon Lakareber and Florence Nakajubi

The purpose of this paper is to provide the initial evidence on the role of business incubation (BI) in supporting startups and BI practices from developing communities in Uganda.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide the initial evidence on the role of business incubation (BI) in supporting startups and BI practices from developing communities in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is cross-sectional and a triangulation of quantitative and qualitative data were used. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and an interview guide from 28 incubators.

Findings

Results indicate that business incubators play different roles in communities such as business assistance, networking, provision of necessary infrastructure and provision of an enabling environment. Furthermore, BI practices were identified such as networking, human resource, tenant management and assessment practices.

Research limitations/implications

This study was cross-sectional and thus monitoring changes in behavior of incubatees overtime was not possible. The study was conducted in Uganda, and it is possible that the results of this study can be generalized to developing communities with environments similar to that of Uganda.

Practical implications

The results are important for business incubators in improving the sustainability of startups in Uganda. The study will enable business incubators to understand their role and incubator practices in as far as supporting small and medium-sized enterprises is concerned.

Originality/value

While there have been a number of studies on BI, this study provides an initial empirical evidence on the role of BI and BI practices using evidence from developing communities in Uganda.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 February 2020

Rogers Mwesigwa, Immaculate Tusiime and Bob Ssekiziyivu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between leadership styles and Organizational commitment among academic staff in Ugandan Public Universities, mediated by…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between leadership styles and Organizational commitment among academic staff in Ugandan Public Universities, mediated by Job Satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was cross-sectional, quantitative, and used correlation and regression to test the hypothesis. A sample of 353 academic staff was drawn from five public universities in Uganda, of which a response rate of 66 percent was obtained.

Findings

Organizational commitment among academic staff in public universities in Uganda depends on the age of the academic staff, length of service, position level, leadership styles employed, and job satisfaction. Findings further show that job satisfaction partially mediates the relationship between leadership styles and organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Only a single research methodological approach was employed; thus, future research through interviews could be undertaken to triangulate.

Practical implications

In order to boost the organizational commitment among academic staff in Ugandan Public Universities, managers should always endeavor to employ a blend of leadership styles that leads to job satisfaction and can add value to the employee-employer relationship.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the body of knowledge by finding further support on the relationship between leadership styles and organizational commitment among academic staff in Ugandan public universities. It further demonstrates that job satisfaction partially transmits the effect of leadership styles on organizational commitment in public universities in Uganda.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2019

Rogers Mwesigwa, Vincent Bagire, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi and John C. Munene

The purpose of this paper is to assess stakeholder management antecedents in public private partnership (PPP) projects in Uganda.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess stakeholder management antecedents in public private partnership (PPP) projects in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is cross sectional and quantitative in nature. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire survey from a sample of 94 PPP projects in Uganda. Stratified random sampling was used in selecting projects for this study. Smart PLS–SEM was used for analysis.

Findings

Results from the study show that the key antecedents of stakeholder management include; communication, engagement, commitment and trust. Communication was found to be the strongest antecedent of stakeholder management. Results also show that trust and commitment are insignificantly associated with stakeholder management in PPP projects.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to the antecedents of stakeholder management in PPP projects in Uganda. Further studies should be conducted in the public and private sectors where there are also multiple stakeholders.

Practical implications

The paper has documented the antecedents of stakeholder management in PPP projects in Uganda. The results will help project managers and policy makers appreciate the different antecedents of stakeholder management and how they are important in managing interests and expectations of different stakeholders.

Originality/value

This research focused on the key antecedents of stakeholder management in PPP projects within the Ugandan context.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Laura A. Orobia, Immaculate Tusiime, Rogers Mwesigwa and Bob Ssekiziyivu

This study aims to investigate the relationship between entrepreneurial framework conditions (EFCs) and business sustainability among youth and women entrepreneurs using the…

8255

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between entrepreneurial framework conditions (EFCs) and business sustainability among youth and women entrepreneurs using the institutional theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is cross-sectional and follows an explanatory research design using 390 youth and women entrepreneurs in Mbarara district (Uganda). A principal factor analysis was conducted to single out the particular constructs of business sustainability and EFC. Inferential analysis was conducted to test the relationships.

Findings

First, the constructs of business sustainability are stakeholder engagements, people and skills, ecosystem management, market and sales and innovation. Second, the constructs of EFC are education, government program and policies, IT infrastructure, market openness and finance. Finally, finance and IT infrastructure are significant predictors of business sustainability among the youth and women entrepreneurs.

Research limitations/implications

The examination of EFCs from the perspective of the consumers/beneficiaries can offer reasonable results when compared to the national expert perspective.

Originality/value

This study generates initial evidence on the applicability of EFCs from the perspective of the individuals as opposed to the national experts.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2071-1395

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2023

Alice Arinaitwe, Vincent Bagire, Benjamin Tukamuhabwa and Tumwine Sulait

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between top management commitment and energy management in small and medium manufacturing firms in a developing country…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between top management commitment and energy management in small and medium manufacturing firms in a developing country context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was executed through a survey of 66 manufacturing firms in Kampala, Uganda. The data collected were analysed using SPSS v.26.

Findings

The results show that top management commitment influences energy management. A further probe of its three dimensions of top management participation, top management support and top management beliefs reveals that all of them positively and significantly predict energy management in manufacturing firms.

Research limitations/implications

The current study results were obtained from manufacturing small and medium firms in Kampala, Uganda. Therefore, caution should be taken prior to generalization. Furthermore, this study only focuses on top management participation, top management support and top management beliefs as the dimensions of top management commitment. This study thus provides the foundation for future studies to test other dimensions of top management commitment, particularly in other sectors.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine the contribution of top management commitment dimensions top management participation, top management support and top management beliefs to energy management in a developing country context. Although all dimensions are significant, top management beliefs contribute more to energy management.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2020

Juma Bananuka, David Katamba, Irene Nalukenge, Frank Kabuye and Kasimu Sendawula

This paper aims to examine the concept and practice of Islamic banking in the context of a non-Islamic country such as Uganda.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the concept and practice of Islamic banking in the context of a non-Islamic country such as Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were used to elicit the strategies banks may use to ensure that the Islamic banking system is successful and to ascertain those factors that may hinder its success. Chief executive officers of business associations, heads of committees on Islamic banking and religious leaders were interviewed.

Findings

The strategies used by financial institutions in ensuring the adoption of Islamic banking are now known such as “creating awareness of Islamic banking’s mode of operation among existing and potential clients.” The findings also show that factors such as “lack of trust among clients” may hinder the success of Islamic banking.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings are useful for informing the deliberations of regulators, the business community and financial institutions. The results are applicable only to those countries in the preparation stages of adopting Islamic banking services for the first time, but they could be generalized to any new product launch in any country.

Originality/value

This paper may help Ugandan financial institutions to design strategies that will accelerate the adoption and, ultimately, the diffusion of Islamic banking in Uganda.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2019

Juma Bananuka, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Musa Kasera and Irene Nalukenge

This paper aims to investigate the contribution of attitude, subjective norm and religiosity on the intention to adopt Islamic banking in an emerging economy like Uganda, which is…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the contribution of attitude, subjective norm and religiosity on the intention to adopt Islamic banking in an emerging economy like Uganda, which is a secular state that is in the early stages of adopting Islamic banking.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a cross-sectional and correlational research design. Usable questionnaires were received from 258 managers of their own micro businesses. A hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results indicate that attitude and religiosity are significant determinants of the intention to adopt Islamic banking, unlike subjective norm whose predictive power is subsumed in attitude. In the absence of attitude, subjective norm is a significant determinant of intention to adopt Islamic banking. Overall, attitude, subjective norm and religiosity explain 44 per cent of the variance in the intention to adopt Islamic banking in Uganda.

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross-sectional, excluding the monitoring of changes in behavior over time. Further, the study used evidence from owner-managed micro businesses in Uganda. It is possible that these results are only applicable to Uganda’s micro businesses.

Originality/value

Islamic banking is an emerging phenomenon on the African continent, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, where most countries are secular states. As such, there are largely no empirical studies exploring the combined contributions of attitude, subjective norm and religiosity on the intention to adopt Islamic banking in an emerging economy after the national adoption of an enabling legal framework. To the best of the researchers’ knowledge, this is the first study that carries out this task.

Details

ISRA International Journal of Islamic Finance, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0128-1976

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Muhammad Rafi, Khurshid Ahmad, Salman Bin Naeem, Asad Ullah Khan and Zheng JianMing

Digital libraries promote and accelerate scientific research in academic institutions. The subscribed database resources of digital libraries have become an increasingly valuable…

Abstract

Purpose

Digital libraries promote and accelerate scientific research in academic institutions. The subscribed database resources of digital libraries have become an increasingly valuable asset for researchers. Database resources help generate new ideas, determine research directions and promote productive academic interaction between teachers and students in the information age. The purpose of this study is to examine the use of electronic resources by students in various databases, the research productivity of the faculty in the science network and the number of students who graduate each year.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a quantitative method to collect secondary data from the central database of the Higher Education Commission (HEC) for the population of 26 universities for 2 years (2015–2016). In addition to the HEC digital library, data was also collected from the Web of Science to determine the quality academic performance of faculty and researchers. Moreover, in the study, the total strength of teaching staff and doctoral faculty was extracted from the HEC website for investigation. The authors applied the Spearman’s correlation test to the secondary data using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 25.

Findings

The correlation results of the enrolled students and the downloaded papers from various databases were statistically insignificant (p > 0.05). However, the result showed a positive correlation (p < 0.05) between the use of selected/known databases from a number of databases accessed by the HEC. More importantly, it turns out that the faculty’s productivity in the scientific network and the number of students who graduated from public and private universities are found to be insignificant (p > 0.05). However, the authors found a positive correlation (p < 0.05) between doctoral and non-doctoral faculties, which show that a significant number of non-doctoral faculties are still actively involved in teaching and research.

Originality/value

Research based on academic activities by faculties and students, performed for the first time on the basis of secondary data, will help the HEC and university management to determine the right direction and develop plans to improve academic performance and research quality.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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