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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Yahya N. Al Serhan, Craig C. Julian and Zafar U. Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to develop and justify a theoretical framework for analyzing the relationship between manufacturing strategy, business strategy, time-based…

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1162

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and justify a theoretical framework for analyzing the relationship between manufacturing strategy, business strategy, time-based manufacturing competence, capability and competitiveness and their impact on firm performance for firms operating in the manufacturing sector. Many executives and scholars have argued that time is an important component for developing a brilliant strategy to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage for the firm.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a theoretical framework primarily concerned with the relationship between time-based manufacturing competence, competitive priorities and firm performance. The framework suggests that firms focusing on time as a strategic factor at both strategic levels – business strategy and manufacturing strategy – can achieve a multi-competitive advantage, and, in turn, high performance.

Findings

To realize the level of performance associated with time-based manufacturing competence, it is essential for firms to identify the areas in which time can be reduced. These include reduction in design lead time, product concept to production; time-based competition for product-to-market firms; time-based manufacturing competence; product development activities; fast-to-product; and customer service.

Originality/value

This article provides a theoretical framework for linking manufacturing strategy to business strategy and performance to help expand the body of knowledge for other researchers to follow.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Kabossa A.B. Msimangira

Reports the results of a study carried out in Tanzanian publictextile manufacturing firms. The purpose was to examine the rolesperformed by middle and senior managers to…

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831

Abstract

Reports the results of a study carried out in Tanzanian public textile manufacturing firms. The purpose was to examine the roles performed by middle and senior managers to enable them to carry out their jobs efficiently and effectively. In addition, the study concentrated on manufacturing management practices and the relationship between managers and subordinates (employees). It was found that middle managers have more practical vision for the future than top (senior) managers. The majority of middle managers, though they perform strategic functions in the organization, do not have as much influence to effect changes as do top managers However, current fundamental problems need to be at least partly solved before any particular management technique can be expected to work well. Where management techniques are applied, they need to start with basic information and reporting before any more advanced methods can be introduced. Proposes recommendations to alleviate some of the problems.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Prasad Siba Borah, Courage Simon Kofi Dogbe, Wisdom Wise Kwabla Pomegbe, Bylon Abeeku Bamfo and Lawrence Kwabena Hornuvo

The purpose of this study is to assess if the mediating effect of green innovation capability (GIC) in the relationship between green market orientation (GMO) and new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess if the mediating effect of green innovation capability (GIC) in the relationship between green market orientation (GMO) and new product success (NPS) was conditional on the moderating effects of green knowledge acquisition (GKA) and green brand positioning (GBP).

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis was based on primary data gathered using a structured questionnaire, which was developed on a five-point Likert scale of 1-Strongly disagree to 5-Strongly agree. There were 259 manufacturing firms engaged in the study, with data analyzed using PROCESS macro (v.3.4) for SPSS (v.23).

Findings

The research revealed that GMO had no direct effect on NPS among manufacturing firms, the relationship was rather mediated by GIC of the firms. The effect of GMO on GIC was moderated by GKA, whereas the effect of GIC on NPS was moderated by GBP. Overall, the mediating effect of GIC in the relationship between GMO and NPS was conditional on the moderating effects of GKA and GBP.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on only knowledge acquisition (green), without recourse to assimilation, transformation and exploitation. These may, however, be very important in explaining the role of knowledge in green innovation.

Practical implications

Green market-oriented manufacturing firms must seek to also make investments in GIC to transform those concepts into successful innovative products.

Originality/value

Despite the increasing number of studies on GMO, very limited concentration has been paid to how firms could leverage on the potentials of GMO to enhance the success of new products introduced into the market. This study did not just establish the effect of GMO on the success of new products but also identified some intervening variables in this relationship.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Atif Saleem Butt

The purpose of this study is to understand how manufacturers (both discrete and process) are managing disruptions amid the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, using UAE as an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand how manufacturers (both discrete and process) are managing disruptions amid the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, using UAE as an empirical context.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a multiple case study approach and undertakes 36 semi-structured interviews with senior management of four discrete and four process manufacturing firms that outsource products/components from overseas and domestic suppliers.

Findings

Results reveal that manufacturing firms are using six distinct actions to mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. For instance, they are relying on the automation process, transferring new and updated knowledge to the current and new suppliers, managing workforce diversity, understanding the impact of demand’s disruption, managing the ecosystem and finally using digital technologies to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. Firstly, the results of this study cannot be generalized to a broader population as it attempts to build an initial theory in manufacturing supply chains within the context of a pandemic outbreak. Second, the study uses a cross-sectional approach to explore the actions used by manufacturing firms to mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Practical implications

Manufacturing firms can replicate the actions proposed in this study to lessen the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and emerge stronger in the post-COVID-era.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the manufacturing supply chain literature within the context of pandemic outbreaks by exploring the steps taken by manufacturing firms to minimize the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Particularly, it explores such steps by considering both the discrete and process manufacturing industries within the United Arab Emirates.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Noor Ullah Khan, Roselina Ahmad Saufi and Amran Md. Rasli

Human Resource Management Marketing Management, Consumer Behavior.

Abstract

Subject Area

Human Resource Management Marketing Management, Consumer Behavior.

Study Level

This case is suitable to be used in advanced undergraduate and MBA/MSc level.

Case Overview

This case illustrates the application of green human resource management (HRM) practices that are inevitable for Malaysian manufacturing firms to mitigate the imbalance between economic and environmental performance. Over the past 12 years, the environmental performance has significantly declined based on data reported by environmental performance index (EPI). This dramatic decline has caused imbalance between economic and environmental performance impacting sustainability of Malaysian manufacturing firms. Among the challenges faced by many manufacturing firms are lacking environmental control, inability to understand and apply green HRM practices, aligning green HRM strategy to firm’s strategy and environmental objectives, educating its existing employees on green HRM, measuring the outcomes of green HRM practices, and changing the existing traditional HRM practices to green HRM practices. This case sheds light on the implication of ISO14001 certification among Malaysian manufacturing firms registered with Federation of Manufacturing Malaysia (FMM) 2015 in addressing this issue.

Expected Learning Outcomes

This case illustrates the following:

  • The application of green HRM practices and how it can improve sustainable performance among ISO14001-certified Malaysian manufacturing firms.

  • The need for adopting ISO14001 certification as the integral part in addressing sustainability issues and in improving firm’s performance.

  • The integration of both green HRM practices and ISO14001 certification helps manufacturing firms to minimize the imbalance between economic and environmental performance and to improve overall sustainable performance.

The application of green HRM practices and how it can improve sustainable performance among ISO14001-certified Malaysian manufacturing firms.

The need for adopting ISO14001 certification as the integral part in addressing sustainability issues and in improving firm’s performance.

The integration of both green HRM practices and ISO14001 certification helps manufacturing firms to minimize the imbalance between economic and environmental performance and to improve overall sustainable performance.

Details

Green Behavior and Corporate Social Responsibility in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-684-2

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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2017

Marco Bettiol, Chiara Burlina, Maria Chiarvesio and Eleonora Di Maria

Defined as local manufacturing systems, industrial districts have been recognized as particularly important for the location of firmsmanufacturing activities intertwined…

Abstract

Defined as local manufacturing systems, industrial districts have been recognized as particularly important for the location of firmsmanufacturing activities intertwined with innovation processes. The debate on the internationalization of production has stressed the low value related to manufacturing within value chain activities (smile framework), emphasizing the need to focus on high value-added activities (R&D or marketing). Following multinational enterprises’ internationalization strategies, also district firms have progressively offshored their production phases in the past years. However, recent studies focused on backshoring have revamped the attention on the domestic control of production for firms’ competitiveness. This chapter explores district firms’ location choices for manufacturing activities between local and global. Based on an empirical analysis of about 260 Italian district firms specialized in mechanics, furniture, and fashion and supported by a case study investigation, our results show that despite district internationalization processes, a non-negligible amount of firms still carry out – in-house or through outsourcing – production activities at district level. Larger firms couple district production and long-term upstream outsourced internationalization activities. The district system confirms its role of pooling specialized competences and product know-how, being decisive for firms’ innovation and responsiveness to national and international markets. Backshoring, instead, is a very limited phenomenon and linked to upgrading strategies.

Details

Breaking up the Global Value Chain
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-071-6

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2021

Zelong Wei and Lulu Sun

The aim of this study was to examine how manufacturing digitalization can be leveraged to promote green innovation in the digital era by investigating the effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to examine how manufacturing digitalization can be leveraged to promote green innovation in the digital era by investigating the effects of manufacturing digitalization on green process innovation, and thus firm performance. The authors also explored how the role of manufacturing digitalization varies with horizontal information sharing, vertical bottom-up learning and technological modularization.

Design/methodology/approach

Five hypotheses were examined by performing regression analyses on survey data from 334 manufacturing firms in China.

Findings

Manufacturing digitalization positively affects green process innovation, and thus firm performance. Furthermore, this positive effect is strengthened by horizontal information sharing and technological modularization and weakened by vertical bottom-up learning.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature rooted in the natural-resource-based view by identifying the crucial role of green process innovation and investigating the value of manufacturing digitalization for developing green capabilities in the digital era. It also contributes to this line of research by revealing contingent factors to leverage manufacturing digitalization from the information processing perspective. Furthermore, this study extends information processing theory to the digital context and identifies the interaction of organizational design (vertical bottom-up learning and horizontal information sharing) and digital investment (manufacturing digitalization).

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 121 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2020

Saumyaranjan Sahoo

The main purpose of this study is to understand how collective operational practices are adapted or stimulated by a firm's competitive strategy.

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to understand how collective operational practices are adapted or stimulated by a firm's competitive strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a data set drawn from 124 plant managers and directors of Indian manufacturing firms. Multiple regression was used to examine the impact of operational practices of lean, total quality management (TQM) and supply chain management (SCM) within competitive clusters of cost leadership, differentiation and focus strategy.

Findings

Results of the study show that the pattern of impact of operational practices on firm's performance varies according to type of the competitive strategy employed. All the three competitive strategy clusters have reported that TQM is the most important trigger for Indian manufacturing firms with relative effect of TQM practices on firm's performance being higher than that of lean and SCM practices.

Research limitations/implications

Cross-sectional data from Indian manufacturing firms were used, and it would be interesting to test the analytical framework of the study for more sectors and countries. Future studies can take a longitudinal research approach to strengthen the findings of the study.

Practical implications

The findings explain how operational practices are aligned with competitive strategies for practitioners so that they can assign limited resources to build diverse operational capabilities based on their strategic choices.

Originality/value

Although very few classical studies are reported in various contexts involving competitive strategy, operational practices and firm's performance, no existing study focuses on how these three domains are linked together in the context of Indian manufacturing sector.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Mohammad Monirul Islam and Farha Fatema

This study examines the innovation-efficiency linkage for Indian and Chinese manufacturing and service firms.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the innovation-efficiency linkage for Indian and Chinese manufacturing and service firms.

Design/methodology/approach

We applied the stochastic production and cost frontier approach to determine the output and cost efficiency of the firms surveyed in World Bank enterprise surveys. We then used both unconditional and conditional propensity score matching (PSM) estimation techniques to examine the effects of innovation as well as R&D on output and cost efficiency of the firms surveyed.

Findings

The study results suggest that innovation-efficiency linkage varies between countries and sectors. Innovations significantly raise output and cost efficiency of Indian manufacturing firms, whereas innovations in Chinese manufacturing firms are cost-oriented and negatively affect output efficiency. For the service firms of both countries, innovations are significantly positively linked with output and cost efficiency. The study also suggests that R&D acts as a crucial moderator for innovation-efficiency linkage for Chinese manufacturing firms but not for Indian firms, and the interaction effects of innovations are not substantially higher in magnitude than their individual effects. Finally, conditional PSM results suggest knowledge spillover for effective innovations of Indian firms, whereas R&D is a must for substantial innovation-efficiency linkage in Chinese firms.

Originality/value

This study offers quite a few crucial policy decisions concerning the relationship between innovation and efficiency as well as the moderation effect of R&D on innovation-efficiency linkage. It concludes that the effects of innovation on firms' efficiency and the role of R&D as a moderator of the innovation-efficiency relationship differ between India and China across the manufacturing and service sectors.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Yang Yu and Valerie Lindsay

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the impact of international outsourcing on manufacturing strategy and performance of apparel manufacturing firms. The authors aim…

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1356

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the impact of international outsourcing on manufacturing strategy and performance of apparel manufacturing firms. The authors aim to show how managers address the effects of international outsourcing on four dimensions of manufacturing strategy – cost, quality, flexibility and delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilises a qualitative exploratory approach. The authors adopted a case study method, collecting data through face‐to‐face, semi‐structured interviews with managers of six apparel manufacturing firms, selected on the basis of a number of criteria, including their use of international outsourcing.

Findings

The findings show that international outsourcing generates both positive and negative effects on the firms' competencies in four manufacturing dimensions (cost, quality, flexibility and delivery). A conceptual framework is presented that shows how firms' managerial actions carried out to address the effects of outsourcing play a crucial role in determining their manufacturing performance.

Research limitations/implications

Because the sample comprised small and medium‐sized apparel firms from New Zealand, the findings may lack generalisability. Further research could expand this work to large multinational companies and service providers in international outsourcing.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that managers of apparel firms which engage in international outsourcing of manufacturing need to consider the impacts on their manufacturing strategy, particularly with respect to the potential trade‐offs between the manufacturing priorities.

Originality/value

The paper addresses a research gap in the outsourcing and manufacturing literatures by exploring the effects of international outsourcing on manufacturing strategy, and the impact of managerial responses to these effects, on firm performance.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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