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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Karen Kelly, Carl James Schwarz, Ricardo Gomez and Kim Marsh

The purpose of this paper is to present an empirical study on the time needed to load and disburse cash using bill validators on slot machines and stand-alone cash…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an empirical study on the time needed to load and disburse cash using bill validators on slot machines and stand-alone cash dispensers in casinos in British Columbia under a Ticket In Ticket Out (TITO) system.

Design/methodology/approach

Testing took place over two days, using 18 machines. The results were extrapolated to estimate the approximate time required to process $1,000,000 with different average bill amounts in the cash mix and three different bill validator machines in common use. The average value per bill using the cash mix used by the public in the casino was $33.11 [standard error (SE) $2.11].

Findings

The mean time/accepted note ranged from 4.12 to 9.65 s, depending on bill validator type. This implies that the time needed to load $1,000,000 onto credit slips using bill validators on slot machines ranges from 35 to 81 h, excluding rest breaks and other breaks. The time needed to redeem $1,000,000 is estimated to be 3 h.

Practical/implications

The implications of these finding for illicit actors to successfully launder large amounts of cash are discussed. Given the time needed to physically handle the cash, and other control systems currently in use in casinos in British Columbia, processing large amounts of cash using bill validators on slot machines would require a highly organized team that would find it difficult to elude detection.

Originality/value

The trial results provide a baseline estimate to be used going forward when investigating or proposing money laundering methodologies that include slot machines.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Adrián Rabadán, Manuel Álvarez-Ortí, José E. Pardo, Ricardo Gómez, Arturo Pardo-Giménez and Miguel Olmeda

The high content of unsaturated fatty acids and the elevated presence of bioactive compounds make pistachio oil a healthy product with great commercial potential. One of…

Abstract

Purpose

The high content of unsaturated fatty acids and the elevated presence of bioactive compounds make pistachio oil a healthy product with great commercial potential. One of the primary constraints for its production is the lack of information regarding oil extraction from an industrial perspective. The purpose of this paper is to ensure the success of pistachio oil production at a commercial scale, attention should be paid to the effect of the main extraction procedures on the characteristics of oil, the consumer acceptance of these oils and their production cost.

Design/methodology/approach

Comparison and evaluation of the physicochemical and sensory characteristics and production cost of oil extracted using two different production lines (hydraulic press and screw press) are considered here.

Findings

Slight differences were found in the physicochemical analysis, but significant differences were identified in the sensory analysis. Consumer judges preferred the oil extracted with the hydraulic press. According to production costs, the break-even value that makes screw press extraction sustainable is €70.4 per litre, while for the hydraulic press it is €91.0 per litre, mainly due to a lower extraction yield and the longer extraction time required. As production costs of both methods are high, pistachio oil quality should prevail, making the use of the hydraulic press more advisable.

Originality/value

Although significant research has been conducted to analyse pistachio oil composition and nutritional value, little attention has been paid to differences that appear regarding consumer preferences and production costs depending on the production method used. This paper provides a comprehensive approach to high-quality pistachio oil production from an industrial perspective.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Emilio Domínguez Escrig, Francisco Fermín Mallén Broch, Ricardo Chiva Gómez and Rafael Lapiedra Alcamí

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence of the relationship between altruistic leader behavior and radical innovation, using organizational learning as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence of the relationship between altruistic leader behavior and radical innovation, using organizational learning as an explanatory variable.

Design/methodology/approach

To confirm the hypotheses, structural equations were used on a data set from a survey carried out on Spanish firms with recognized excellence in human resources management.

Findings

The study empirically validates the conceptual model. Results suggest that organizational learning capability fully mediates the relationship between altruistic leader behavior and radical innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The database used in the study is very heterogeneous. Future research might delimit the database by organization size or sector.

Practical implications

Results suggest ideas for organizations that want to implement a working environment that fosters innovation performance in order to achieve radical innovations.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies to concentrate on altruistic leader behaviors as such. This paper contributes to understanding how altruistic leader behavior affects radical innovation and the key role played by organizational learning capability.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Emilio Domínguez-Escrig, Francisco Fermín Mallén Broch, Ricardo Chiva Gómez and Rafael Lapiedra Alcamí

The objective of this study is to analyze the relationship between leaders' forgiveness and organizational performance using radical innovation as an explanatory variable.

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to analyze the relationship between leaders' forgiveness and organizational performance using radical innovation as an explanatory variable.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in a sample frame of 11,594 Spanish companies. A total of 600 valid questionnaires were obtained. The structural equations were used to validate the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Results confirmed the hypotheses proposed in the model: the authors provided, through structural equations, empirical evidence of the relationship between leaders' forgiveness and organizational performance, mediated by radical innovation. Leaders' forgiveness promotes radical innovation and, in turn, performance.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of companies is heterogeneous in terms of firm turnover, size and age. The study is focused on radical innovation.

Practical implications

The present study may help to develop more humane policies to manage human resources, by taking into account employees' feelings and needs.

Originality/value

The business field is closer to competitive values and has traditionally underestimated the importance of leaders' forgiveness. This is one of the few studies that empirically analyze the consequences of leaders' forgiveness within organizations.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2020

Francisco Fermín Mallén Broch, Emilio Domínguez Escrig, Ricardo Chiva Gómez and Rafael Lapiedra Alcamí

Based on the upper echelons and organisational identification theories, this paper focuses on the relationship between servant leadership and firm innovativeness, as well…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the upper echelons and organisational identification theories, this paper focuses on the relationship between servant leadership and firm innovativeness, as well as the underlying mechanisms that explain this relationship. More specifically, we analyse the relationship between servant leadership, firm innovativeness and corporate social responsibility to employees (CSRE).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 285 Spanish firms took part in the study, and 570 questionnaires were gathered. Structural equation modelling was used to validate the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Results suggest that servant leadership has a positive relationship with firm innovativeness, and this relationship is fully mediated by CSRE.

Research limitations/implications

HR managers have an overall view of their company and of the behaviour of other leaders. However, future research should also consider employees perceptions. The present study is cross-sectional, and it would be interesting to study the development of the interaction between leaders and followers, which calls for longitudinal and multilevel studies.

Practical implications

According to our results, managers could foster firm innovativeness if they select and promote leaders who display the different leadership behaviours related to servant leadership: empowerment, servitude, accountability, courage, authenticity, humility and stewardship. Moreover, training programmes should also foster these behaviours.

Originality/value

Few empirical studies analyse the relationship between servant leadership and innovation. The main contribution of the present research is to further the current knowledge of this relationship by disentangling the mediating role of corporate social responsibility to employees.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Ricardo Chiva‐Gómez, César Camisón‐Zornoza and Rafael Lapiedra‐Alcamí

Examines the relationship between organizational learning and product design management while, at the same time, analysing the repercussions they may have on performance…

Abstract

Examines the relationship between organizational learning and product design management while, at the same time, analysing the repercussions they may have on performance, in the Spanish ceramic tile sector. A comparative case study of four companies from this sector enabled the construction of a theoretical model, which linked the factors that facilitate organizational learning, in the context of product design management, with the activities of this practice. In this model, 14 factors are seen as being essential to the existence of organizational learning and may be divided into two groups: one related to the activities that have to do with the conceptual‐analytical phase of the product design process, and the other linked to the activities related to the creative‐technical phase. All these factors are positively associated with efficient product design management and with improved business performance.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Agustín Santella

This chapter aims to contribute to the study of social protests around the world and particularly in Latin America during the 1960s and 1970s, with a focus on an…

Abstract

This chapter aims to contribute to the study of social protests around the world and particularly in Latin America during the 1960s and 1970s, with a focus on an Argentinean case. Throughout these years, Argentina like many other Latin American societies witnessed the growth and development of intense social and political struggles in concert with the armed insurgency. Did workers or other popular social sectors support guerrilla organizations in Argentina? What was the interconnection between working-class and armed insurgent struggle? This chapter examines these liaisons by studying the case of an industrial city that has been identified to be a paradigm of labor radicalization and political violence in Argentina—Villa Constitución. Through the reanalysis of documents and sources as well as interviews, we discuss established interpretations on armed and labor struggles that reveal a broader heterogeneity in the forms of social support to revolutionary violence. Solidarity among workers and armed militants appears in (1) the actions of militant workers at their workplaces, and (2) the armed actions organized by militants in support of worker’s fights.” These two groups reinforced each other's activism. But, by no means can we directly deduct from this that rank and file workers immediately identified their strikes with ideologically revolutionary objectives.

Details

The Capitalist Commodification of Animals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-681-8

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2010

Ricardo Gomez

This paper aims to present the research methodology for the global study “Landscape of public access to ICT in 25 countries” (referred to as the Landscape study), a study…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the research methodology for the global study “Landscape of public access to ICT in 25 countries” (referred to as the Landscape study), a study conducted in 2007‐2009 by the University of Washington's Center for Information and Society, with a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study looked at public access venues (public libraries, telecenters, cybercafés, other) that offer public access to information, especially through information and communication technologies (ICT), in 25 countries around the world.

Findings

The paper describes here the criteria for the country selection, selection of local research partners in each country, research design considerations, data analysis, and limitations of the study.

Practical implications

The scope of the research undertook meant sacrificing some depth in exchange for breadth resulting in a broad blanket of understanding over a variety of topics, but not enough depth to really understand their intricacies, causes or effects. In future steps the authors intend to explore ways to adapt the research framework to apply it to in‐depth studies of a particular country or context.

Originality/value

This paper presents a research methodology example that is transferrable to other multi‐national surveys.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Ricardo Gomez, Rucha Ambikar and Chris Coward

This paper aims to offer early insight into ongoing research comparing public access venues such as libraries, cybercafés and telecentres in 25 countries around the world.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer early insight into ongoing research comparing public access venues such as libraries, cybercafés and telecentres in 25 countries around the world.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors studied information needs and uses of information and communication technologies (ICT) in these public access venues, with a particular focus on underserved populations.

Findings

Understanding trends, differences and similarities across venues and across countries offers an emerging map that will help researchers and policymakers conduct future research and make better decisions to strengthen public access to information through ICT.

Originality/value

The research was done in partnership with local research teams in 25 countries around the world, and studied public libraries, telecentres and cybercafés side by side, while most studies in the past have looked at them independently of one another.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Ricardo Gomez and Elizabeth Gould

This paper aims to determine how trust and perceptions shape uses of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in public access venues (libraries, telecentres, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine how trust and perceptions shape uses of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in public access venues (libraries, telecentres, and cybercafés) in 25 developing countries around the world.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a global study conducted by the Technology & Social Change Group at the University of Washington, local research teams conducted surveys, site visits, and interviews of over 25,000 respondents in different types of public access venues in the selected countries, using a shared research design and analytical framework.

Findings

The use of public access venues is shaped by the following trust factors: safety concerns, relevance of the information, reputation of the institution, and users' perceptions of how “cool” these venues are. While libraries tend to be trusted as most reputable, telecentres tend to be trusted as most relevant to meet local needs, and cybercafés tend to be perceived as most “cool”.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited by its descriptive and not predictive nature, and is not based on a statistically representative sample of the population.

Practical implications

The insight presented in this paper can help inform policy decisions about public access initiatives, and inform future research to better understand the causes and consequences of trust in public access ICT. Understanding these perceptions helps gain a more nuanced understanding of the way services are provided in venues that offer public access to ICT.

Originality/value

This paper is novel as it covers public access to ICT in 25 developing countries across different types of venues, using a shared design and methodological approach. A study of this magnitude has never been done before. The findings provide valuable insight into understanding how people trust different types of public access ICT venues.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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