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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Dzuljastri Abdul Razak, Muhammad Bilal and Hanudin Amin

The purpose of this study is to examine the determinants influencing low- and middle-income households in accepting the Islamic public-private housing co-operative model…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the determinants influencing low- and middle-income households in accepting the Islamic public-private housing co-operative model (IPHCM) as an alternative to contemporary affordable public housing models in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Using self-administrated questionnaires, data are collected from low- and middle-income households dwelling in Programme Perumahan Rakyat projects in Kuala Lumpur and the state of Selangor. The study used the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and used the partial least squares technique to examine the proposed hypothesised relationships.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest that subjective norm and perceived consumer religiosity is the most influential determinants affecting the behavioural intention of low- and middle-income households in accepting the IPHCM model. Attitude had a significantly positive relationship with households’ behavioural intentions towards accepting the IPHCM model.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can serve as a guideline for policymakers to understand the behavioural intention of low- and middle-income households in accepting newly developed models in affordable public housing space.

Originality/value

Behavioural aspects regarding the acceptance of affordable public housing models in Malaysia have yet to be profoundly explored in the literature. This study has extended the TPB by incorporating perceived consumer religiosity, in the affordable public housing domain, to analyse its effects on households’ acceptance of the IPHCM model.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Dustin C. Read and Drew Sanderford

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of the Brightwalk community in Charlotte, North Carolina, to explore some of the tradeoffs municipalities make when…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of the Brightwalk community in Charlotte, North Carolina, to explore some of the tradeoffs municipalities make when engaging in public–private partnerships designed to support the production of mixed-income housing in urban neighborhoods.

Design/methodology/approach

The results of a gray literature review and a series of in-depth interviews conducted with real estate practitioners familiar with the transaction are presented to evaluate the impact of market forces on key investment decisions and project outcomes.

Findings

Public–private partnerships formed to support mixed-income housing development can serve as an effective means of revitalizing economically stagnant urban areas and improving the quality of the affordable housing stock, but they do not always provide members of the development team with an equally strong incentive to satisfy the unique demands of low-income populations or ensure they have a seat at the table when development decisions are made.

Originality/value

The originality of the research lies in its focus on a public–private partnership led by a non-profit organization to facilitate the redevelopment of a dilapidated market-rate apartment complex into a revitalized mixed-income community, which may help municipalities evaluate the pros and cons of participating in similar development transactions.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Cedric Pugh

It was not until the late 1960s that housing attracted much attention from academic social scientists. Since that time the literature has expanded widely and diversified…

Abstract

It was not until the late 1960s that housing attracted much attention from academic social scientists. Since that time the literature has expanded widely and diversified, establishing housing with a specialised status in economics, sociology, politics, and in related subjects. As we would expect, the new literature covers a technical, statistical, theoretical, ideological, and historical range. Housing studies have not been conceived and interpreted in a monolithic way, with generally accepted concepts and principles, or with uniformly fixed and precise methodological approaches. Instead, some studies have been derived selectively from diverse bases in conventional theories in economics or sociology, or politics. Others have their origins in less conventional social theory, including neo‐Marxist theory which has had a wider intellectual following in the modern democracies since the mid‐1970s. With all this diversity, and in a context where ideological positions compete, housing studies have consequently left in their wake some significant controversies and some gaps in evaluative perspective. In short, the new housing intellectuals have written from personal commitments to particular cognitive, theoretical, ideological, and national positions and experiences. This present piece of writing takes up the two main themes which have emerged in the recent literature. These themes are first, questions relating to building and developing housing theory, and, second, the issue of how we are to conceptualise housing and relate it to policy studies. We shall be arguing that the two themes are closely related: in order to create a useful housing theory we must have awareness and understanding of housing practice and the nature of housing.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 13 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Porfirio Guevara, Robert Hill and Michael Scholz

This study aims to show how hedonic methods can be used to compare the performance of the public and private sector housing markets in Costa Rica.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to show how hedonic methods can be used to compare the performance of the public and private sector housing markets in Costa Rica.

Design/methodology/approach

Hedonic price indexes are computed using the adjacent-period method. Average housing quality is measured by comparing hedonic and median price indexes. The relative performance of the public and private sector residential construction is compared by estimating separate hedonic models for each sector. A private sector price is then imputed for each house built in the public sector, and a public sector price is imputed for each house built in the private sector.

Findings

The real quality-adjusted price of private housing rose by 12 per cent between 2000 and 2013, whereas the price of private housing rose by 9 per cent. The average quality of private housing rose by 45 per cent, whereas that of public housing fell by 18 per cent. Nevertheless, the hedonic imputation analysis reveals that public housing could not be produced more cheaply in the private sector.

Social implications

The quality of public housing has declined over time. The hedonic analysis shows that the decline is not because of a lack of competition between construction firms in the public sector. An alternative demand side explanation is provided.

Originality/value

This study applies hedonic methods in novel ways to compare the relative performance of the public and private housing sectors in Costa Rica. The results shed new light on the effectiveness of public sector housing programs.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Eziyi O. Ibem and O.O. Amole

The purpose of this paper is to present research assessing the level of qualitative adequacy of newly constructed public housing in urban centres in Ogun State, Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present research assessing the level of qualitative adequacy of newly constructed public housing in urban centres in Ogun State, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/ approach

The study followed a quantitative research strategy. A survey of 517 housing units constructed through four different strategies and selected based on quota of their existence in nine public housing estates was conducted with a questionnaire as the key data collection instrument. A five‐point Likert scale was used in measuring the level of qualitative adequacy of four key housing sub‐components. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics.

Findings

Residents found the overall housing to be inadequate; they indicated that housing unit attributes were the most adequate and thus contributed most, while neighbourhood facilities were the least inadequate and contributed the least to qualitative housing adequacy.

Research limitations/implications

The sample population comprised mainly house heads in public housing constructed between 2003 and 2009 therefore, the findings may not be considered to be applicable to all the public housing in the study area. However, the findings can form the basis for judging the performance of public housing in the current democratic dispensation in the study area.

Practical implications

The findings imply that giving adequate attention to the provision of infrastructural facilities and maintenance of existing ones can enhance the qualitative adequacy of public housing.

Originality/value

This paper is a pioneering effort at evaluating the qualitative adequacy of most recently constructed public housing in the study area.

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Eziyi O. Ibem

The general aim of this research is to investigate residents' perception of the quality of public housing and factors influencing this in Ogun State Southwest Nigeria…

Abstract

Purpose

The general aim of this research is to investigate residents' perception of the quality of public housing and factors influencing this in Ogun State Southwest Nigeria. This is in view of a paucity of published works on this subject matter and the need to upgrade the quality of public housing in urban areas in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study were collected through a cross sectional survey of proportionately selected 517 household heads in newly constructed public housing estates, and 90 staff members of four key public housing agencies in urban areas of Ogun State, Nigeria. Structured questionnaires were used in the collection of primary data. Descriptive statistics and categorical regression analysis were used in data analysis.

Findings

The results show that a majority of the respondents rated their current residential environment low on the quality scale. Whereas housing unit attributes were rated highest, neighbourhood facilities were rated very low on the housing quality scale. Housing delivery strategies, spatial deficiencies in housing units, organizational capacity of housing providers, age, income, education and tenure status of residents were found to be among the key factors influencing residents' perception of housing quality in the study area.

Research limitations/implications

The survey was concentrated on newly constructed public housing by Ogun State government in selected urban areas. Other studies can examine housing constructed by the Federal Government of Nigeria in the study area.

Practical implications

Lack of access to housing services, infrastructure and neighborhood facilities accounts for poor quality of public housing in the study area. This can be improved through adequate provision of basic social amenities, organizational capacity building and adoption of appropriate housing delivery strategies by public housing providers.

Originality/value

A framework for studying the quality of public housing in Nigeria and other countries has been developed. The findings can assist public housing policy makers and programme managers to improve on the quality of public housing and services.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 29 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2017

Wenbo Qin, Antonio Sánchez Soliño and Vicente Alcaraz Carrillo de Albornoz

Though China is taking many steps to offer affordable houses to the public, the gap between the demand and supply for such affordable houses is still huge. Rapidly growing…

Abstract

Though China is taking many steps to offer affordable houses to the public, the gap between the demand and supply for such affordable houses is still huge. Rapidly growing demand for affordable housing has encouraged large Chinese cities, faced with housing imbalance, to invest in developing affordable properties. As a result, the Chinese central government has started to encourage local governments to use Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) and private capital to supplement the funding deficit. There is also an on-going debate regarding the need to establish prerequisites for institutions to meet in order to achieve effective PPPs. In this paper, we examine what the current institutional environment is in China and how China is meeting these prerequisites for effective PPPs. We also examine the main programs on affordable housing and propose a potential field for using PPPs. We draw the conclusion that PPPs are more favorable for renting-oriented type projects than owning-oriented projects. In this context, the advantages of the PPP model for China's renting-oriented affordable housing programs are would be the provision of private financing, the enhancing efficiency by involving private sector experts and the statement of bundling constructions and maintenance and operation work in the contract, which motivates the private sector to build properties up to standard for its cost efficiency from the whole project perspective.

Details

Open House International, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Tony Gilmour, Ilan Wiesel, Simon Pinnegar and Martin Loosemore

The purpose of this paper is to use the example of public housing renewal public‐private partnerships (PPPs) to build knowledge on whether social infrastructure PPPs may…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use the example of public housing renewal public‐private partnerships (PPPs) to build knowledge on whether social infrastructure PPPs may appeal to the private sector as a less risky investment in a time of global financial uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on an international literature review and a limited number of semi‐structured interviews with social housing PPP participants in England, the USA and Australia. These interviews were conducted by Dr Gilmour as part of his doctoral research in 2008.

Findings

The familiar distinction between social and other forms of infrastructure PPPs has been found to be unhelpful in the case of public housing renewal. This type of PPPs, through their cross‐subsidisation model, face relatively high revenue risk during a recession. However, the commitment of the public sector to the social goals of such projects suggests contract negotiation rather than default is likely if problems occur. PPP risks need to be understood by studying their detailed contract terms, rather than by broad categorisations.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides a grounded discussion rather than detailed research findings. Only a small number of projects are included and they are not necessarily representative. Cross‐national comparison is challenging because of different housing policies and economic conditions.

Originality/value

This paper fills a gap in the literature by both contrasting approaches to a particular type of social infrastructure PPP in different countries, and by making an early assessment of the likely impact of recent turbulence in financial and property markets.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2015

Jolanta Aidukaite and Christian Fröhlich

The purpose of this paper is to explore urban mobilisation patterns in two post-Soviet cities: Vilnius and Moscow. Both cities were subject to similar housing and urban…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore urban mobilisation patterns in two post-Soviet cities: Vilnius and Moscow. Both cities were subject to similar housing and urban policy during Soviet times, and they have implemented urban development using neoliberal market principles, provoking grassroots opposition from citizens to privatisation and marketisation of their housing environment and local public space. However, the differing conditions of democratic Lithuanian and authoritarian Russian public governance offer different opportunities and set different constraints for neighbourhood mobilisation. The purpose is to contrast local community mobilisations under the two regimes and highlight the differences between and similarities in the activists’ repertoires of actions in two distinct political and economic urban settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs qualitative methodology using data from semi-structured interviews conducted with community activists and state officials, presented using a comparative case study design.

Findings

Although, citizens’ mobilisations in the two cities are reactions to the neoliberalisation of housing and local public space, they take different forms. In Vilnius they are institutionalised and receive formal support from national and local authorities. Moreover, support from the EU encourages organisational development and provides material and cognitive resources for grassroots urban mobilisations. In contrast, residents’ mobilisations in Moscow are informal and face fierce opposition from local authorities. However, even in an authoritarian setting, grassroots mobilisations evolve using creative strategies to circumvent institutional constraints.

Originality/value

Little attention has been paid to grassroots urban mobilisations in post-Soviet cities. There is also a lack of comparative attempts to show variation in post-Soviet urban activism related to housing and local public space.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 November 2016

Micol Bronzini and Carla Moretti

The chapter aims to analyze an innovative intervention in the context of public housing in Italy. Over the past decade, in Italy, neighborhoods with a high concentration…

Abstract

The chapter aims to analyze an innovative intervention in the context of public housing in Italy. Over the past decade, in Italy, neighborhoods with a high concentration of public housing have increasingly become spaces of exclusion, where conflicts are rife, due to a multiplicity of factors (e.g., immigration, social deprivation, ageing, health problems). In particular, because of the global economic crisis and the impoverishment of Italian families, competition and quarrels between lower middle-class natives and migrants have been exacerbated, undermining the recent fragile pattern of social cohesion. However, housing and urban policies are still residual, especially in the political agenda of mid-sized towns, which witness an ungoverned urban growth not always accompanied by a concurrent complete recognition of citizenship. Moreover, policies tackling rising social tension to reduce or prevent it are lacking. Nonetheless, at a local level, some more dynamic municipalities are starting to promote original initiatives also thanks to the sharing of the best national and international practices. In particular we wish to focus on the social mediation processes implemented to prevent conflict and promote sustainable cohabitation, improving relationships between neighbors and fostering empowerment and participation. In this perspective, the chapter explores a two-year project of social mediation for households living in public housing which has been developed in the Marche region.

Details

Public Spaces: Times of Crisis and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-463-1

Keywords

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