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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Cengiz Mesut Tosun

Turkey has witnessed the mass migration movement of Syrian citizens fleeing the Syrian civil war. These people have been defined as ‘foreigners under temporary…

Abstract

Turkey has witnessed the mass migration movement of Syrian citizens fleeing the Syrian civil war. These people have been defined as ‘foreigners under temporary protection’. However, the UN Convention does not include temporary protection or similar definitions in relation to migrants, refugees, and asylums and accepts them as migrant workers. In our country, people under temporary protection, whose majority is composed of Syrians work in informal jobs. The most important document aiming at granting legal rights to people who are found in a country without any legal position or who is identified as an irregular worker, not as an employee and migrant worker, is the International Convention for the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Their Families. Turkey has become a party to this document. The UN Convention gives immigrant workers and family members a wide range of protective rights, such as work, settlement, education, and trade union rights. In this chapter, the positions of foreigners in temporary protection who are trying to make a living by collecting recyclable materials such as mostly paper, etc., which is defined as a part of the street economy, will be discussed in terms of the provisions of the UN Convention.

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A New Social Street Economy: An Effect of The COVID-19 Pandemic
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-124-3

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Gil S. Epstein and Yosef Mealem

In this chapter, we consider the interaction between local workers and migrants in the production process of a firm. Both local workers and migrants can invest effort in…

Abstract

In this chapter, we consider the interaction between local workers and migrants in the production process of a firm. Both local workers and migrants can invest effort in assimilation activities to increase the assimilation of the migrants into the firm and so increase their interaction and production activities. We consider the effect the relative size (in the firm) of each group and the cost of activities has on the assimilation process of the migrants.

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Migration and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-153-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2017

Xiao Zhang and Jianglong Zhang

In recent years, the conflict between migrant workers and urban social development has become increasingly serious, which has seriously affected the development of the…

Abstract

In recent years, the conflict between migrant workers and urban social development has become increasingly serious, which has seriously affected the development of the city. Based on this, taking the urban integration of migrant workers as the core, starting from social capital, it was proposed that housing space, employment and public service were the mian reasons for the difficulty of migrant workers' urban integration. Taking the spatial planning of Shenzhen as an example, the spatial distribution of migrant workers in Shenzhen, the impact of three times urban plannings on the agglomeration of farmers, as well as the planning of affordable housing and its existing problems were studied. The space for migrant workers to integrate into cities was constructed. Through the construction of urbanization, urban and rural development can be integrated. This study has a certain theoretical guiding significance for the integration of migrant workers and urban planning, and can indirectly promote the rapid development of the city..

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Open House International, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Manmeet Kaur, Sukhbir Singh, Madhu Gupta, Pankaj Bahuguna and Soma Rani

People often migrate from rural to urban areas within a country or from less developed to more developed countries for better life opportunities but may remain outside the…

Abstract

Purpose

People often migrate from rural to urban areas within a country or from less developed to more developed countries for better life opportunities but may remain outside the range of health services. The purpose of this paper was to find out the socio-economic and health system factors that may affect the utilization of health services by the migrants.

Design/methodology/approach

Five villages and three slums were randomly selected from 23 villages and 18 slums of Chandigarh, a northwest Indian city. Using stratified random sampling, 145 migrants and 63 native women, who were pregnant or had delivered a baby from April 1, 2009 to March 31, 2012 were interviewed using semi-structured interview schedule. χ2 was used for testing statistical significance of the differences, and logistic regression was utilized to evaluate the “independent effect” of migration on Maternal and Child Health (MCH) service utilization.

Findings

The level of education was higher among migrants than the natives but their income was less than that of natives. Majority of the migrant women had registered themselves for antenatal care (ANC) in the first trimester of pregnancy (55 percent) compared to the natives (21 percent), but only few had availed more than three ANC check-ups (18 percent) as compared to the natives (44 percent). Knowledge about danger signs of childhood diarrhea and pneumonia was low among migrants compared to the natives (p < 0.0001). Health workers interacted less often with migrants (29 percent) than the natives (67 percent). After controlling the effect of socio-economic and -demographic variables, utilization of MCH care services were significantly higher among natives than the migrants. Inadequate community support among migrants led to the lower utilization of MCH care.

Research limitations/implications

Present study reflects early ANC registration among migrants but the number of ANC visits much less than the natives. This could be further be investigated using qualitative methods.

Practical implications

Specific strategies are required to address the health needs of migrants such as formation of community-based support groups. Health services and health workers need to be oriented to support migrants to the special needs of migrants.

Social implications

Reduction in inequality in accessing health between natives and migrants can be addressed with social support.

Originality/value

The study supports the fact that migration is one of the social determinants of health. Lack of community support to migrants is the major barrier in accessing the health services.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Archana Preeti Voola, Subhasis Ray and Ranjit Voola

The purpose of this paper is to expand the theoretical understanding of social inclusion of vulnerable populations. Employing cross disciplinary literature from marketing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand the theoretical understanding of social inclusion of vulnerable populations. Employing cross disciplinary literature from marketing and social policy, this paper examines the factors shaping internal migrant workers experience of inclusion and vulnerability in the context of COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a review of social inclusion and consumer vulnerability literature to develop a new and innovative conceptual framework which operationalises social inclusion. This framework was then examined using an illustrative case study of internal migrant worker crisis in India. Data for the case were collected from various national and international media, government and non-government reports published in English on the pandemic related migrant crisis in India.

Findings

Access and control over food was fraught with barriers for migrant workers. As the lockdown progressed, access to and control over work opportunities was precarious. Furthermore, the resource-control constraints faced by migrant workers in terms of food, work and transport had a direct impact on their experience of social inclusion. Lastly, the stranded migrant workers found themselves unable to fully participate in economic activities.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge this is the first paper that integrates consumer vulnerability concept, originating in marketing scholarship into the social inclusion framework. This allowed for anchoring the “aspirational goals” of social inclusion into the concrete context of consumers and marketplaces.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Hazel Baxter-Reid

The purpose of this article is to examine the tactics and strategies utilised by Central Eastern European (CEE) migrant workers as they strive to develop their mobility…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the tactics and strategies utilised by Central Eastern European (CEE) migrant workers as they strive to develop their mobility power within the employment relationship and outside of the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Data is drawn from three qualitative organisational case studies. In total 70 interviews with migrant workers, managers and HR staff were undertaken. There were also nine focus groups with migrant workers across the case studies.

Findings

Developing mobility power is not straightforward, particularly in the context of hard HRM strategies. The majority of CEE workers across the case studies viewed the employment relationship as temporary; however, people found it difficult to develop the mobility power necessary to leave and move to a better job. This can be attributed to a combination of people's individual subjective factors and employment in occupations with limited structural and associational power.

Originality/value

This article engages with debates concerning the agency of migrant workers. Existing studies have focused upon the way in which migrant workers utilise mobility power to leave unfavourable employers. However, this article builds upon current debates by examining how migrant workers develop their mobility power. There is also consideration of the individual and collective dimensions of power.

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Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Yi-Jung Teresa Hsieh

Muslim refugee migrants are a growing ethno-religious disadvantaged minority group in several Western societies, and host-country language proficiency and employment are…

Abstract

Purpose

Muslim refugee migrants are a growing ethno-religious disadvantaged minority group in several Western societies, and host-country language proficiency and employment are essential factors in reducing this disadvantage. This paper thus explores the efficacy of English training programs in facilitating the settlement and employment of a group of male Muslim refugees in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is qualitative in nature, with data collected using semi-structured, in-depth interviews with the eight participants in the study. Analysis was conducted using Bourdieu's concepts of field, capital and habitus.

Findings

English training programs offered to Australian Muslim men are problematic in their aim of linking them to employment. Areas of concern are identified in respect to the training hours offered, their learning environment, their content and pedagogy, their lack of focus on employment and their failure to recognise the existing work skills of the migrants.

Research limitations/implications

The study is conducted with a small sample of male Muslim migrants: while the findings may be similar for other refugee groups, further research is necessary to confirm this.

Practical implications

There is a need to restructure the current English training programs offered to refugee migrants in Australia, Muslim or otherwise. This study identifies several areas where such restructuring might occur, both at the policy and pedagogical levels.

Originality/value

Few studies focus on Australian male Muslim migrants. This study enhances understanding of this under-researched group and their struggles to learn English, find employment and rise above their disadvantaged societal position.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Parvathy M.L. and Hemalatha K.

Sustainable development goals (SDGs) recognize the importance and interrelation between health and migration. Women migration and health is well researched, yet less…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable development goals (SDGs) recognize the importance and interrelation between health and migration. Women migration and health is well researched, yet less attention is paid to their healthcare utilization, especially with regard to overall health and well-being. This paper aims to highlight the gap in the existing literature on health care utilization by women migrants.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was carried out following the PRISMA guideline. For the review, the literature was taken from three electronic databases, which were Springer Link, Taylor and Francis and PubMed. From a total of 1,575 studies, seven studies cleared the eligibility screening.

Findings

Of seven studies, five were found to focus on the sexual and reproductive health of the women migrants than their general health and well-being, and less attention is paid to health promotion and illness prevention beyond reproductive and sexual health. While, studies on general health have focused on the influence of health status on health care utilization and the influence of health insurance in health care utilization. The review has revealed the disparities faced by migrant women in different countries while seeking health care.

Originality/value

Studies on women migration and health care utilization have largely focused on the reproductive and sexual health needs of women, and this overemphasis often undermines their accessibility and affordability to overall health and well-being. Therefore, the present study has moved away from the concept of sexual and reproductive health tot that of overall health and well-being of women migrants.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Nadia Arshad and Adele Berndt

The purpose of this study is to understand the role of the migrant entrepreneur’s social capital and specifically their family social capital in the success of their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand the role of the migrant entrepreneur’s social capital and specifically their family social capital in the success of their crowdfunding ventures.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops an exploratory single case study of the Persu Bag started by a Chinese migrant entrepreneur in the USA, which was documented through in-depth interviews, email communication, social media interactions and secondary documents publicly available. This paper draws on crowdfunding and social capital literature to fulfil the purpose and adopt the perspective of the migrant entrepreneur in the study.

Findings

The study shows that the crowdfunding migrant entrepreneur’s family network contributes with their operand and operant resources from both the country of residence and country of origin. Besides having financial capacity, institutional knowledge and experience from both the host and home countries, the family network in both countries make the crowdfunding immigrant entrepreneur’s families more resourceful, providing additional benefits to the crowdfunding migrant entrepreneurs in the development of the campaign and crowdfunded venture.

Originality/value

This study broadens the understanding of the ways migrant entrepreneurs can rely on their family social capital for building financial capacity and starting a crowdfunded venture.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Sanjit Sarkar

The spread of COVID-19 from Wuhan to the global countries has a direct association with human mobility. Perhaps, human mobility increases the hazards of COVID-19 due to…

Abstract

Purpose

The spread of COVID-19 from Wuhan to the global countries has a direct association with human mobility. Perhaps, human mobility increases the hazards of COVID-19 due to its communicable characteristic of human-to-human transmission. Thus, the volume of migrants and migration may have a significant role in the outbreaks of COVID-19 in any country. Given that India homes more than 45 crores of migrants, the present study aims to examine the linkages between migration flows and COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study has used secondary sources such as data sharing portals, census, news and media reports and Web sources. The updated COVID-19 data was retrieved from the www.covid19india.org, whereas migration rates were analysed from the D-series of census 2011.

Findings

Nearly 23% of total inter-state migration occurred for the livelihood only. The numbers of cases have raised much earlier and faster in migrant's destination states than in migrant's origin states. Further, as shown in the scatterplots, that positive association between “COVID-19 and in-migration” is found to be more robust than “COVID-19 and gross-migration”. On the other hand, the migrant's origin states are also experiencing a rapid increase of COVID-19 cases due to large numbers of returning migrants. These return-migration flows have created major administrative, social and public health challenges, particularly in the origin states, and as a whole in India.

Originality/value

This paper has potential to help policy planners to identify the COVID-19 vulnerability of various states in respect to the migration perspectives. Moreover, it also enhances the understanding to establish the linkage between COVID-19 outbreaks and migration.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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1 – 10 of over 10000