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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Linda J. Searby

The purpose of this paper is to define and describe the mentoring mindset in a protégé. The central research question was: What constitutes a mentoring mindset in a protégé

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define and describe the mentoring mindset in a protégé. The central research question was: What constitutes a mentoring mindset in a protégé who is poised to receive maximum benefits from a mentoring relationship, as described by the mentor?

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenological approach was used to conduct this study. Interviews were conducted with veteran school principals who were trained mentors, assigned and paired with newly appointed principals for a year of mentoring. The identification of the phenomenon of the mentoring mindset of the protégé was derived from the mentors’ perspectives of their protégés’ behaviors, dispositions, attitudes, and competencies, as they were conveyed in the research interviews.

Findings

A definition of the protégé's mentoring mindset was created after analysis of the interview data, and indicators of the presence and absence of the mindset were formulated into a Protégé Mentoring Mindset Framework that provides information on protégé competencies. The protégé with a mentoring mindset takes initiative, possesses a learning orientation, has a goal orientation, is relational and reflective. Conversely, the protégé who does not have a mentoring mindset lacks initiative, lacks a learning orientation, a goal orientation, and is not relational or reflective.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of the study is that it only gathered the perceptions of the mentor, but the protégé is the one being described. This, however, is consistent with other studies of protégé competencies. The study was conducted with a specific population (school principals) in a southern state of the USA. Hence, it cannot be assumed to be generalizable to other populations or fields of study. Replication of this research in other settings is suggested, so that the Framework can be further affirmed, disconfirmed, or augmented. Implications of this research could be that the Mentoring Mindset Framework can be used for considering the varied competencies of the protégé, and can be used in both mentor and protégé training.

Originality/value

To this researcher's knowledge, there has not been a Protégé Mentoring Mindset Framework of competencies created in mentoring research.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Annette Vincent and Judy Seymour

Female executives in the USA were surveyed to determine characteristicsof and interactions of mentors and protégés. Questions focus onpreparation for roles, selection…

Abstract

Female executives in the USA were surveyed to determine characteristics of and interactions of mentors and protégés. Questions focus on preparation for roles, selection process, gender issues, relationship of mentor/protégé, number of mentors each protégé has had, benefits to careers, and other relationships derived from mentoring. Major findings are that an individual who has been a protégé is more willing to become a mentor; that an individual who has had a mentor is more willing to enter subsequent mentoring relationships; and that more women are mentors today as compared with the number of women mentors ten years ago.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

J. Patrick Pigott, John Gammack, Diarmuid Pigott and Val Hobbs

The aim of this paper is to describe the practical application of a reflective knowledge development lifecycle (KDLC) designed to be used by organisations reviewing their

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to describe the practical application of a reflective knowledge development lifecycle (KDLC) designed to be used by organisations reviewing their KM processes and capability. The KDLC had emerged from practical experience but had not been more widely validated. The present study seeks to provide a unique opportunity to test theory comprehensively against an exemplary case where both organisation and investigator were suited to the work.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study research strategy was used. Applying the theory in a practical setting, an environmental scientist used the model and associated knowledge representation and visualisation tools to find gaps in processes and design in the implementation of an organisation‐wide research framework.

Findings

Developing the knowledge repository highlighted inherent complexity among people, resources, research activities, operational tasks and communication outcomes. The study helped validate the KDLC's utility in ensuring alignment of organisational processes and strategy; demonstrating its useful application in a practical setting.

Research limitations/implications

A replication across several organisations would help to refine the model beyond this critical test in a single organisation, while suggesting further practical recommendations.

Originality/value

The results of the study suggest that the KDLC is of value to practitioners in providing a check‐list approach for knowledge auditing, to theorists developing organisational KM models and those using test‐case strategies. The outcomes will particularly interest information and environmental professionals involved in establishing adaptive management projects.

Details

VINE, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Frances Kochan, Linda Searby, Manju P George and Jon Mitchell Edge

The purpose of this paper is to examine the usability of the Cultural Framework Analysis Process, a strategy designed to examine cultural factors in mentoring endeavors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the usability of the Cultural Framework Analysis Process, a strategy designed to examine cultural factors in mentoring endeavors and to identify whether there are patterns of cultural elements that served to hinder or facilitate mentoring programs across a variety of organizations and contexts. The process also involves identifying methods for overcoming the barriers and enhancing the facilitating factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Graduate students in a class on mentoring were given an assignment to analyze a mentoring program using the Cultural Framework Analysis Process. They were also asked to share their most significant learning outcomes. Data were gathered by two student groups over a two-year period. Researchers determined the usability of the analysis process by evaluating the quality of the student submissions. They aggregated the data and conducted a content analysis on the facilitating and hindering factors to determine commonalities and the lessons learned.

Findings

The Cultural Framework Analysis Process appears to be a useful tool in examining and dealing with cultural elements in mentoring programs and relationships. The barriers and facilitating factors were closely related to one another. The five barriers to success were matching processes; mentee attitude toward matching; lack of organizational support; static or closed organizational culture; and organizational or community culture. The five factors that facilitated mentoring endeavors were: comprehensive and flexible matching; mentee/mentor attitudes; training; organizational culture and demonstrated commitment; and a focus on mentees.

Practical implications

The ability to examine the cultural elements in the context of mentoring is vital in assuring mentoring success. Having a description of how the process was conducted should be of value to those wanting to engage in similar analyses. The findings related to the factors identified should help guide those engaged in mentoring endeavors to become more aware of elements to consider and deal with as they create and operationalize their programs.

Originality/value

There is a need to enhance the knowledge about the cultural factors involved in mentoring programs and relationships. This research study expands the understanding and presents findings about barriers and supports to mentoring that have not been previously reported. It also provides a mechanism for others to conduct similar analyses as they develop, implement and research mentoring endeavors.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Paula Kwan and Yuet-man Benjamin Li

The purpose of this paper is to understand the dilemmas facing Hong Kong vice-principals in discharging their roles and to further explore their engagement in informal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the dilemmas facing Hong Kong vice-principals in discharging their roles and to further explore their engagement in informal mentoring as a coping mechanism in the absence of a structured professional development program.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative study was conducted in the form of in-depth face-to-face, loosely structured individual interviews with ten informants from a variety of personal and school backgrounds, contributing to a set of data that unveiled the basic themes.

Findings

Three dilemmas facing Hong Kong vice-principals were identified: juggling administrative work with teaching, standing by management or siding with peer teachers, and forced innovation vs omnipresent conservatism. The findings also suggested that the informants tended toward external resources intentionally with a view to gaining emotional support as well as professional stimulation. They also engaged in informal mentoring, which took the form of observing principals’ behaviors, joining support groups organized by school governing bodies, and enrolling in academic programs offered by universities and/or professional bodies, as a way to resolve the dilemmas.

Research limitations/implications

Informal mentoring has been identified as an effective approach for Hong Kong vice-principals to acquire the skills and knowledge needed to overcome workplace challenges and the feelings of loneliness experienced upon changing their role. The findings point to the importance of formalizing mentoring in vice-principal development programs.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to explore the impact of informal mentoring on vice-principals in Hong Kong where both dual-career track systems and a structured mentoring programs are missing.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Allan D. Walker, Chong Keng Choy and Low Guat Tin

Presents some observations from both mentors andprotégés who have been involved in a formal mentoringprogramme at the National Institute of Education in Singapore…

Abstract

Presents some observations from both mentors and protégés who have been involved in a formal mentoring programme at the National Institute of Education in Singapore. Data showed that the mentor/protégé relationship is best initiated in an informal environment away from the school, that mentors should clearly communicate their expectations, that mentoring relationships move through developmental and interpersonal stages, and that the benefits of the relationship are reciprocal for the mentor, protégé, the organization, and the system. Presents some suggestions for mentoring programmes in their early stages of development.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Eugenie Samier

This paper explores the value of informal and formal mentoring for the preparation of senior administrative ranks in the public sector. Through the construction of a…

Abstract

This paper explores the value of informal and formal mentoring for the preparation of senior administrative ranks in the public sector. Through the construction of a conceptual framework identifying essential features of mentoring roles, qualifying characteristics, relationships, and stages, and a consideration of the organizational conditions under which it is more likely to succeed, planned mentoring programs and their administrative implications are evaluated.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Marsha A. Playko

Reflects on the practice of mentoring from a practitioner′sperspective. Explores the strengths of mentoring programmes and notesthese far outweigh some of the limitations…

Abstract

Reflects on the practice of mentoring from a practitioner′s perspective. Explores the strengths of mentoring programmes and notes these far outweigh some of the limitations which might exist. Draws attention to some important issues such as planning, training, and appropriate matching of mentors and protégés which must be considered by schools and districts with an interest in mentoring if these programmes are to achieve success.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Kathleen Sciarappa and Christine Y. Mason

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceived efficacy of a US-based national principal mentor training program.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceived efficacy of a US-based national principal mentor training program.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 370 protégés who received services from principal mentors in a national mentor internship program were invited to complete an electronic survey. Responses were obtained from 54 protégés.

Findings

The 54 respondents rated the mentor program highly, indicating that mentors were well prepared, good listeners, and instrumental in strengthening their instructional leadership.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides preliminary information on the perceived efficacy of the program. To more fully understand the needs of new principals and the value of varying mentor approaches, follow-up interviews, a research design that provides for data to be disaggregated by specific mentor trainers and dates/locations of training sessions, and comparative data from protégés supported by mentors prepared by other programs are needed.

Practical implications

Protégés reported high job satisfaction and recommended the program to others.

Originality/value

New principals reported that the principal mentoring was critical to their adjustment and success during their first year. This is the only known principal mentor program requiring a nine-month internship. The outcomes revealed the value of evaluating perceptions of protégés for continuous quality improvement.

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Book part
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Paul Lim and Andrew Parker

Abstract

Details

Mentoring Millennials in an Asian Context
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-484-3

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