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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

K.S. Murali

Data were gathered on demographic, forest‐related and geographic parameters to understand the pattern of forest cover change in the Indian subcontinent and discern any…

762

Abstract

Data were gathered on demographic, forest‐related and geographic parameters to understand the pattern of forest cover change in the Indian subcontinent and discern any underlying factors contributing to forest cover change. Observations indicated that the marginal worker force in many states influences the forest cover change. The states with a lower percentage of forest cover to their geographical area undertook large‐scale plantation activity to enhance the forest cover in the state. Incidentally, these states also had a higher proportion of marginal worker population to their total population. However, the states with high proportion of forest area had a lower proportion of marginal worker population, indicating there is a relation between the proportion of marginal workers in the population to the proportion of forest cover in the state. Thus, a proportion of population that is mostly dependent on the forest for its livelihood in some part of the year becomes unemployed if forests are denuded. Concludes that the forest in a given locality enhances employment opportunity for the local people for their livelihood sustenance. Therefore the policy initiatives should look into employment generation opportunity, apart from enhancing forest cover and regeneration of these forests.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Mohd Arip Kasmo

Water supply is closely linked to forests. In developing countries, especially those in the tropics, large forest areas are cut down for timber, agriculture and…

1433

Abstract

Water supply is closely linked to forests. In developing countries, especially those in the tropics, large forest areas are cut down for timber, agriculture and industries. The effect of deforestation on water sources could be examined through the study of the correlation between of the size of the forest clearing area and the size of the water in the dam and also the correlation between the size of the forest area and the size of the water area in the dam. Reports the finding of a study on the effect of deforestation of catchment areas and the ability of dams to sustain water during the dry season. Analyses images of the catchment areas obtained for nine consecutive years by satellites. The findings show that there is a negative correlation between the size of the forest clearing and the size of the water area in the dam and a positive correlation between the size of the forest areas and the size of the water areas.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Roger A. Sedjo

This paper aims to examine the effects of the use of environmental easements and forest certification on the output of ecosystems services from private forestlands in the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effects of the use of environmental easements and forest certification on the output of ecosystems services from private forestlands in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion of the changes in ownership and management of private forest lands in the USA is based on a review of the literature, the degree of recent activity in the innovative changes, and an assessment of the extent of ownership and management changes.

Findings

The use of environmental easements, resulting from ownership changes, and forest certification have facilitated, indeed mandated, forest management that is consistent with an increase in the provision of environmental and ecosystem services from private forests. The rapid expansion of environmental easements has been accommodated by the dramatic changes in forest ownership patterns in the USA, as traditional corporate ownerships have sold off large land areas to other private ownership types. Forest certification, which provides for improved management of ecosystem services, also has expanded rapidly in recent years.

Practical implications

This study suggests forest management to provide environmental and ecosystem services can be achieve through environmental easements and forest certification. These changes can occur as the result of environmental interests entering forest land markets and affixing easements to the land. This finding suggests an alternative to the approach to establishing separate markets for ecosystem services, as is often suggested, and requires no increased governmental actions or new regulations. Rather these improvements are driven by voluntary forest certification and/or environmental groups entering the private markets for forest lands.

Originality/value

This study suggests an alternative to the commonly held notion that separate markets for environmental and ecosystem services are required to increased their outputs. Rather, environmental easements and voluntary certification, in the face of changing ownership can provide the incentives for management changes that increase the outputs of environment and ecosystem services.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2009

Miguel E. Leal

In answer to the urgent need to adapt conservation strategies and approaches to climate change, the purpose of this paper is to locate the climatically stable forests in…

Abstract

Purpose

In answer to the urgent need to adapt conservation strategies and approaches to climate change, the purpose of this paper is to locate the climatically stable forests in West and Central Africa and to assess whether they overlap with the existing network of protected areas and if not, to prioritize them for protection.

Design/methodology/approach

With ongoing global warming, rain forest will survive where locally soil moisture content remains high compensating for the regional drought stress. As a proxy for a soil moisture‐driven model, rainfall >2,000 mm, altitude >500 m and strong relief (standard deviation in elevation data pixels) were overlapped in a GIS analysis to locate the climatically stable forest within the present continuous forest of Central Africa and within the degraded forest of West Africa. As a means of verification, the biodiversity was measured in and outside the identified areas in Gabon and Equatorial Guinea as high levels of biodiversity are related to the survival and stability of the forest in the past. Biodiversity was calculated (measured as Fisher‐α diversity) for all trees (dbh >5 cm) on 66 transects (200 × 5 m).

Findings

The forest areas identified as climatically stable in the GIS analysis showed a higher biodiversity than the forest outside these areas (student T‐test: P<0.000035, stable = 54.7 and unstable = 33.7), supporting the validity of the model. Mapping the results of the GIS query showed that most of the climatically stable forests in West and Central Africa are located outside the park systems, and that it is already too late to protect the climatically stable forest in West Africa as almost nothing is left of it.

Originality/value

Wedged in between large‐scale drought tolerant ecosystems the African rain forest is most vulnerable to global climate change. Knowing which parts are climatically stable and resilient helps to set and focus conservation priorities and efforts. This approach is a powerful tool which has helped to identify areas with a high‐conservation priority in Africa.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Biswajeet Pradhan, Mohd Dini Hairi Bin Suliman and Mohamad Arshad Bin Awang

In a tropical country like Malaysia, forest fire is a very common natural and man‐made disaster that prevails in the whole South East Asian region throughout the year…

3054

Abstract

Purpose

In a tropical country like Malaysia, forest fire is a very common natural and man‐made disaster that prevails in the whole South East Asian region throughout the year. Recently, the haze problem in Malaysia has created a lot of awareness among the government and eco‐tourism sectors. Therefore, detection of the hotspot is very important to delineate the forest fire susceptibility mapping. In this study, remote sensing and geographical information systems (GIS) have been used to evaluate forest fire susceptibility at Sungai Karang and Raja Muda Musa Forest Reserve, Selangor, Malaysia. Frequency ratio model has been applied for the delineation of forest fire mapping for the study area.

Design/methodology/approach

Forest fire locations were identified in the study area from historical hotspots data from year 2000 to 2005 using AVHRR NOAA 12 and NOAA 16 satellite images. Various other supported data such as soil map, topographic data, and agro climate were collected and created using GIS. These data were constructed into a spatial database using GIS. The factors that influence fire occurrence, such as fuel type and Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI), were extracted from classified Landsat‐7 ETM imagery. Slope and aspect of topography were calculated from topographic database. Soil type was extracted from soil database and dry month code from agroclimate data. Forest fire susceptibility was analyzed using the forest fire occurrence factors by likelihood ratio method.

Findings

A new statistical method has been applied for the forest fire susceptibility mapping. The results of the analysis were verified using forest fire location data with the help of a newly written programming code. The validation results show satisfactory agreement between the susceptibility map and the existing data on forest fire location. The GIS was used to analyze the vast amount efficiently, and statistical programs were used to maintain the specificity and accuracy. The result can be used for early warning, fire suppression resources planning and allocation.

Originality/value

All data used in this study are original. The forest fire susceptibility mapping has been done in this study area for the first time. A new program has been coded to cross‐verify the susceptibility map. The results were also verified with field data and other supporting weather data.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1991

Hsioh‐yu Hou

Forests should be thought of not merely as “timber”,but also as treasuries of plants and animals as well as “greenreservoirs”. The preservation and management of montane…

Abstract

Forests should be thought of not merely as “timber”, but also as treasuries of plants and animals as well as “green reservoirs”. The preservation and management of montane forests are therefore of importance. Different ways should be adopted according to the corresponding conditions of four montane forest regions of China. Afforestation in the humid eastern plains and southern rolling hills should be paid great attention, because these areas have much more rainfall, deep and fertile soil and sufficient atmospheric heat. Protection forests planted on farmlands and along the southeastern seaboard not only raise the output of crops, but also provide timber, fuel and forage. It is necessary to strengthen the rewarding utilisation system of forest resources. The current irrational remuneration of afforestation workers and forest engineering workers doing similar jobs but for different wages must be changed.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 18 no. 8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Aisha Olushola Arowolo, Mure Agbonlahor, Peter Okuneye and Jubril Soaga

Emerging evidence revealed a high rate of dependence of marginal people on forest resources in developing countries for both subsistence use and cash income. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Emerging evidence revealed a high rate of dependence of marginal people on forest resources in developing countries for both subsistence use and cash income. The purpose of this paper is to examine the rural livelihoods welfare dimensions of community forest income in south-western Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Forest activities and income pattern data were collected from 160 rural households’ selected using multistage sampling approach. Descriptive statistics and Gini decomposition technique were used to analyse the data.

Findings

The result shows that forest income accounts for about 38.2 per cent of total household income and was the first ranked source of income in the study area. The Gini decomposition analysis showed that access to forest income is income inequality reducing in the study area. The study findings suggests that household welfare in rural Nigeria could be improved through policies and programmes that can stimulate sustainable access to forest resources and assist households to earn income from alternative sources such as agriculture.

Originality/value

The result of the study helped provide information on the uses and benefits of community forests as it affects the well-being of rural people. Also, it provides the benchmark for policy makers, government agencies and NGO's involved in rural livelihood outcome of forest communities.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Anh Ngoc Cao and Tanya Wyatt

Unsustainable logging and illegal logging for domestic and international trade and trafficking continue to lead to deforestation. It is crucial that Sustainable…

Abstract

Unsustainable logging and illegal logging for domestic and international trade and trafficking continue to lead to deforestation. It is crucial that Sustainable Development Goal 15 ‘Sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, halt and reverse land degradation, halt biodiversity loss’ is achieved to maintain the livelihoods of people and protect the planet. This is the case in Vietnam as well, where many people, including indigenous groups, rely on the forest for their survival. Drawing on semistructured interviews in Vietnam and a literature review, we investigate how the abuse of forest policies leads to human insecurity. From this, we propose solutions to (1) end unsustainable harvesting and illegal logging (SDG 15.7), (2) integrate the value of forests (culturally and economically) into national and local planning, the development process and poverty elimination strategies (SDG 15.9) and (3) improve the use of forest protection funding provided by international donors.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Crime, Justice and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-355-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2016

Maria Teresa Uribe-Jaramillo

The purpose of this chapter is to give an interpretation to the limits of Indonesia’s forestry policy through the sustainable development approach analyzing the crossroads…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to give an interpretation to the limits of Indonesia’s forestry policy through the sustainable development approach analyzing the crossroads between economic development and environmental sustainability. There is an expansion and intensification of industrial plantations such as palm oil, as part of the economic development strategy, which must coexist with ongoing efforts of conservation of forest resources in the pursuit of environmental sustainability, including policies such as the Forest Moratorium.

Design/methodolgy/approach

The study explores the influence of the economic development of the palm oil industry in the environmental sustainability of the Forest Moratorium during the period 2011–2014. A case study on the Forest Moratorium is presented analyzing the operativeness of sustainable development principles in the discourse and concrete actions of this specific policy.

Findings

The study evidences that there is a basic problem in Indonesia’s forestry policy and the sustainable development approach, not only because of its inherent contradictions, but also due to the flaws in its interpretation and implementation. It is necessary to rethink the sustainable development, its scopes and limitations, taking into consideration its hybridity, dynamism, and constant transformation. It is also necessary to consider the feasibility of a paradigm shift or a search for sustainable solutions based on other parameters. One way of doing it should include a more participatory approach with a joint work by the government, local communities, nongovernmental organizations, the private sector, and academia.

Research limitations/implications

First, as this is a case study the findings are not generalizable; and second, the social dimension of sustainable development is not incorporated in its entirety, as this study focuses mainly on the economic and environmental dimensions.

Practical implications

The findings contribute to the discussion in the theoretical and public policy fields, on the crossroads between economic development and environmental sustainability in the international agenda for sustainable development.

Originality/value

The study allows capturing the discussion in a concrete case and learning from the experience of Indonesia, its institutional failures, and the causes of its environmental problems.

Details

Climate Change and the 2030 Corporate Agenda for Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-819-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 September 2015

Richard K. Reed

The forests of eastern Paraguayan have been cleared, forcing the indigenous Mbyá-Guaraní to take refuge in cities. Rather than assimilate into the city’s underclass as…

Abstract

Findings

The forests of eastern Paraguayan have been cleared, forcing the indigenous Mbyá-Guaraní to take refuge in cities. Rather than assimilate into the city’s underclass as other indigenous people do, Mbyá remain on the margins of the national society and protest their land loss in increasingly public demonstrations against the government. This research points to the historical struggle that the Mbyá-Guaraní of eastern Paraguay have waged against the state to explain Mbyá identity and action in the urban environment.

Research limitations/implications

Recent work with indigenous refugees shows that dislocation entails not only a disruption of social ties, but efforts to reestablish identities and relations in their new conditions. This research explores the interplay of urban conditions and historic struggles in the development of these new indigenous identities for the Mbyá-Guarani.

Practical implications

Indigenous refugees in extreme poverty are a growing problem in urban Latin America. Once residents of the forest, these groups squat in vacant lots and scavenge for a living, ravaged by disease, drugs, alcohol, and sex work. This work seeks to identify the factors that lead some indigenous people to integrate into urban society, while others assert themselves against that system.

Details

Climate Change, Culture, and Economics: Anthropological Investigations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-361-7

Keywords

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