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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Engin Mustafa

The paper aims to put forward ten ways in which learning and development can become more effective.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to put forward ten ways in which learning and development can become more effective.

Design/methodology/approach

It explains how each of the ten characteristics – align learning and development with strategic direction, control learning and development activity, develop the learning and development team, quantify learning and development, seek external accreditation and recognition, involve senior leadership, establish a heightened profile, integrate technology in learning, model best practice and move the function outside its comfort zone – helps to ensure that learning and development will become more effective.

Findings

It reveals that showing how learning and development provides a return on investment is only part of demonstrating its success.

Practical implications

The paper emphasizes the importance of learning and development aligning its activities with organizational strategic direction.

Social implications

It highlights the importance of an effective learning and development function to the success of individual organizations and, through that, to society as a whole.

Originality/value

The paper gives easy‐to‐understand advice to learning and development specialists.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1987

Thomas N. Garavan

The idea that learning is a natural human activity which takes place in a relatively non‐contrived way as part of everyday life has, in the author's experience, been lost…

Abstract

The idea that learning is a natural human activity which takes place in a relatively non‐contrived way as part of everyday life has, in the author's experience, been lost when one considers the present state of training and development in many modern organisations. While it is accepted that some contrivance of the learning activity is necessary in order to make it more effective, there has been something of an obsession amongst trainers and consultants to come up with new methods and approaches, rather than concentrating on helping people to learn. Furthermore, the training function has tended not to emphasise the important role that the line manager plays in the development activity within the modern organisation. This may have arisen because the training function wanted to demonstrate ownership and establish a power base within the organisation; however, centralised ownership of training and development does not lend itself to the promotion and undertaking of non‐contrived on‐the‐job/natural development activities.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1978

R.A. Burgess and B.G. Fryer

Some recent research lends support to the evolving idea that management is specific to the situation, so that neither the work nor development of managers can be…

Abstract

Some recent research lends support to the evolving idea that management is specific to the situation, so that neither the work nor development of managers can be considered without reference to many variables. Case studies of four organisations and interviews with more than fifty managers in the construction industry suggest that managers rely heavily on interpersonal, decisional and problem handling skills, which they consider are largely derived from their work experiences. Management development programmes may assist the learning of such skills but are unlikely to make their best contribution unless organisations acknowledge learning as a mainstream activity, giving more thought to their long range development strategies, evolving suitable ‘learning climates’ and encouraging their managers to take a greater measure of responsibility for their own development. On the basis of this research we concluded that the contribution of the management development practitioner should be more variable than has usually been the case. His role, like that of the manager, should be largely determined by the situation and he should be responsive to the particular needs of organisations and individual managers. The research supports the argument for greater emphasis on the relationship between managerial action and learning and suggests that the methods used should be more carefully selected to suit individual managers' learning styles and development objectives.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Evgenia I. Lysova, Sabrine El Baroudi and Svetlana N. Khapova

This article presents a summary of the interview with Rino Schreuder, managing director of the European Management Development (EMD) Centre, founder and chairman of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article presents a summary of the interview with Rino Schreuder, managing director of the European Management Development (EMD) Centre, founder and chairman of the European Executive Development Network, Editor of the Dutch Management Development Journal, and Editorial Board member of the UK journals Development & Learning in Organizations and Leadership & Organization Development Journal. Schreuder has over 20 years of experience working for Fortune 500 and other firms in the area of management development and training.

Design/methodology/approach

The interview is conducted by three independent interviewers.

Findings

In this interview, Rino Schreuder shares his perspective on the present situation and the future of the Dutch learning and development market. Drawing on a parallel between the properties of the Dutch culture and problems in the learning market, Schreuder highlights the importance of more integrated ways of working between learning providers. He also calls for rethinking the role of learning professionals and chief learning officers (CLOs) in organizations and the organizational practices that measure learning outcomes through return on investments (ROI).

Originality/value

The paper presents valuable insights of a leading professional in the field of management development and training into the future of learning and development in The Netherlands.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Jean Barclay

Looks at learning logs and their relevance in the context of self‐development in organizations and in education ‐ especially within skills development programmes.

Abstract

Looks at learning logs and their relevance in the context of self‐development in organizations and in education ‐ especially within skills development programmes.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Grace Coleman and Hadyn Ingram

Recounts how learning and development strategy at Costa Coffee (a division of Whitbread Restaurants) was investigated and shaped through a postgraduate research study…

Abstract

Recounts how learning and development strategy at Costa Coffee (a division of Whitbread Restaurants) was investigated and shaped through a postgraduate research study. Describes the research methodology, which sought to benchmark Costa Coffee’s learning and development department and team against two competitors, resulting in the creation of a new benchmarking model. Shows how the model can be used to measure and monitor learning and development effectiveness and offers conclusions for organizations in hospitality, retail and other industries.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Alan Mumford

Little has been written about developing directors and even lessabout how to integrate learning on a formal programme with learningthrough work itself. New research on…

Abstract

Little has been written about developing directors and even less about how to integrate learning on a formal programme with learning through work itself. New research on learning from experience is reviewed and the four approaches which were found to have been used by directors are described. Examples are given of programmes built on structured work‐shops for directors of two major UK companies; how working on real projects within such workshops can be integrated with “normal” learning from experience is illustrated. Finally it is shown how this form of devel‐opment improves organisational performance.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

– To propose a framework for sustainable e-learning to guide development of an innovative learning environment in the higher education sector, particularly in Malaysia.

Abstract

Purpose

To propose a framework for sustainable e-learning to guide development of an innovative learning environment in the higher education sector, particularly in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Presents a literature review based on searching four well-known online databases to identify articles, books and conference proceedings that discuss e-learning and sustainable development.

Findings

Educational sustainability can mean two things: sustainability of education and education for sustainability. Malaysia – an export-led economy driven by industrial and technological progress – has ambitious plans for further economic development as far ahead as 2020. The government aims to strengthen creativity and innovation by improving the education system. Of course, economic plans have resource implications, and one of the most promising ways of delivering an innovative learning environment is through e-learning. This raises the question of how economic and educational development can be sustained, and the role of e-learning in achieving and maintaining sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

Focuses the literature review on academic publications.

Practical implications

Argues that sustainable e-learning can help the higher education sector to boost the supply of innovative and creative graduates and at the same time, to lower costs through more efficient use of resources.

Social implications

Explains that the sustainable approach to e-learning can increase student motivation, engagement with and control over their learning. It achieves this through the use of developing Web technologies that give them personalized access to a broad range of information resources.

Originality/value

Provides insights into the characteristics of sustainable e-learning and identifies gaps in the existing research. Integrates factors relevant to e-learning, technology and sustainable development into a single framework for sustainable e-learning.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Melissa Noonan, Gina Richter, Larry Durham and Eric Pierce

The paper aims to describe the macro-level realities driving change for learning organizations and professionals including: volatility, uncertainty, complexity and

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe the macro-level realities driving change for learning organizations and professionals including: volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity (VUCA) environment; information explosion; flattening organization; mobile and virtual workforce; and generational mix. It also describes implications for these realities and the critical shift from learning development to enablement via practices like learning curation, learning personalization, social learning and new and diverse learning modalities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for a review of marketplace, business and industry trends, as well as reviews of specific primary research and current publications, to support its viewpoint.

Findings

The VUCA of global; social; governmental; and economical systems is catalyzing the need for systemic change in the learning and development (L&D) industry. This will change the learning content that organizations will need to offer and the processes by which L&D leaders will need to identify and curate it.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills the need to explain the necessity of changes required in skill sets and best practices for the modern learning organization.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Ulrik Brandi and Rosa Lisa Iannone

The purpose of this paper is to examine learning strategies for competence development at the enterprise level, and how these can be actualised in practice. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine learning strategies for competence development at the enterprise level, and how these can be actualised in practice. The authors focus on three influential aspects, namely: the highest valued employee skills, main triggers for learning and investment in learning, as well as the most successful types of learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical research was designed according to abductive reasoning. The data draw on research we undertook between 2013 and 2015, including semi-structured interviews with management, human resources and union representatives, as well as questionnaire responses from a total of 31 EU and 163 EU-competitors, across 53 industries and 22 countries.

Findings

Competence development requires flexible, learner-centred strategies for initiatives that respond to immediate business needs. Additionally, despite soft competences being so highly valued and sought after, investment (financial and other) by enterprises in developing them is low, relative to the investments poured into hard competences. Also, there is a clear employee demand gap for learning that develops soft competences.

Originality/value

Findings and recommendations are based on a large-scale empirical study, providing state-of-the-art knowledge, upon which we can renew our current learning strategies in workplaces.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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