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Publication date: 4 May 2018

Jamidi, Abdul Rauf, Chairani Hanum and Erwin Nyak Akop

Purpose – The purpose of the research aims to observe the high growth of corn crops with a different cropping pattern.Design/Methodology/Approach – The research is…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of the research aims to observe the high growth of corn crops with a different cropping pattern.

Design/Methodology/Approach – The research is conducted based on field experiments with Group Randomized Design (hereafter RAK shortened from Cluster Random Design). The treatment of cropping pattern I is that corn crops are planted in one row with the size of plot 9 m × 4 m, and the distance planting of the crops is 70 cm × 40 cm. Cropping pattern II is that corn crops are planted in two rows with the size of plot 9 m × 4 m, and the distance planting is 70 cm × 40 cm. Cropping pattern III is that corn crops are planted in three rows with the size of plot 9 m × 4 m, and the distance among the crops is 70 cm × 40 cm.

Findings – The result of research shows that the highest corn crops are from cropping pattern II.3 at age 15 and 30 after planting time (called HariSetelahTanam or HST). The increase of cropping rows from one row to two rows indicates that intra-specific competition are more dominant. The growth of crops is faster because they need full sunlight at vegetative and generative stages. The need of full sunlight at the growing stage causes the increasing of stem height of crops to enable the crops to receive the sunlight optimally due to the continuity of photosynthesis process. The increasing growth of stem diameter is in accordance with the growth speed of height plant at the same age.

Research Limitations/Implications – This research intends to find out the best growing process of the plant. Further research is needed to study the outcome of final product of the plant.

Practical Implications – This is to see the utilization of the best cropping pattern and optimal land utilization.

Originality/Value – High growth of corn crops and stem diameter (Zea may, S) with a different cropping pattern has not yet been published.

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Proceedings of MICoMS 2017
Type: Book
ISBN:

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Robert J. Vokurka and Benito E. Flores

This research determines and updates industry’s use of plant charters and their characteristics in terms of plant structure differences, competitive priorities…

Abstract

This research determines and updates industry’s use of plant charters and their characteristics in terms of plant structure differences, competitive priorities, manufacturing improvement initiatives, and performance. Industry differences are identified and compared to a 1982 study. The most predominant plant charter strategy remains a product plant charter assignment. Responses to a survey indicated that plants are created differently, i.e. there are structural differences between the plant charter strategy types. However, in general, the competitive priorities, efforts to improve manufacturing effectiveness, and resulting performance are essentially the same. This suggests seemingly similar manufacturing strategies regardless of the plant structure being used.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 102 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1982

Nicholas Kinnie

Senior managers in multi‐plant companies are faced by a dilemma: how can they control Industrial Relations centrally, but at the same time allow scope for flexibility? One…

Abstract

Senior managers in multi‐plant companies are faced by a dilemma: how can they control Industrial Relations centrally, but at the same time allow scope for flexibility? One way of solving this problem is to permit negotiations to take place in the plants, but to regulate this bargaining in some way from a central Personnel department. Why do companies feel obliged to intervene in the affairs of plants in this way? How is this intervention carried out in practice? Is it, for example, through agreements common to all plants, or through loosely worded guidelines from company level?

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Employee Relations, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Steve Brown

Shows evidence of two types of manufacturing firm: traditional (low performing plants) and enlightened (high performing plants), and makes the case that the distinction in…

Abstract

Shows evidence of two types of manufacturing firm: traditional (low performing plants) and enlightened (high performing plants), and makes the case that the distinction in quality is not so much between Japanese versus Western, as it is between traditional and enlightened approaches to quality. The enlightened firms have the following characteristics. First, they see quality as an ongoing, never‐ending pursuit of customer satisfaction, rather than as a managerial fad which might be replaced by subsequent “management‐guru” terms. Second, they have senior manufacturing personnel committed to quality. Third, they have manufacturing strategies which help to translate external customer requirements into internal operational approaches. The differences in capability of quality levels between traditional and enlightened manufacturers are both intriguing and, for the traditional group, alarming. Clearly, the enlightened firms recognize the enormous benefits of, and remain committed to, TQM and they offer an approach which sets them apart from the traditional group.

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The TQM Magazine, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Stefano De Antonellis and Mario De Antonellis

The aim of the study is to identify main failure phenomena and to evaluate reparation costs, reparation time, loss of profit and their relationship with power plant and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to identify main failure phenomena and to evaluate reparation costs, reparation time, loss of profit and their relationship with power plant and faulty components age. In this work, several machinery breakdowns occurred in thermal power plants fed by solid biomass, biodiesel, biogas and municipal solid waste, have been investigated. In the period between 2004 and 2012, 23 faults have been analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

Each fault has been classified considering: power plant technical specifications, type of damage, reparation cost, reparation time and loss of profit (when data are available). The whole data have been, therefore, compared to find out significant information.

Findings

It has been pointed out that relevant property damages are mainly caused by old components failure. In addition, the loss of profit is generally much higher than the property damage (six times on average basis).

Originality/value

The study provides useful information that can be of interest for personnel of energy utilities, banks and insurance companies in managing power plants risks and in planning the availability of energy services.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

P.B. Beaumont

In a series of recent articles, Lawler has argued that new established plants are especially likely to embody high (employee) involvement work systems. These work systems…

Abstract

In a series of recent articles, Lawler has argued that new established plants are especially likely to embody high (employee) involvement work systems. These work systems contain a significant number of mutually reinforcing arrangements and practices such as antonomous work groups, quality circles, gain sharing plans, etc. Indeed he goes as far as to content that in these new plants “… almost no aspect of the organisation has been left untouched. The reward systems, the structure, the physical layout, the personnel management system and the nature of jobs have all been changed and in significant ways” (pp. 6–7). There are certainly individual case studies of the arrangements of such plants in the United States, but in the absence of comprehensive survey data the extent to which they are representative of the population of newly established plants as a whole has been called into question.

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Personnel Review, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Jian Liu and De‐jie Yu

Precise and logical plant maintenance evaluation, which enables enterprise to distinguish its most suitable maintenance pattern for application, is the base of improvement…

Abstract

Precise and logical plant maintenance evaluation, which enables enterprise to distinguish its most suitable maintenance pattern for application, is the base of improvement in plant maintenance. In this paper a new method based on data envelopment analysis (DEA) is proposed to evaluate the relative efficiency of plant maintenance. In this method, a systematic functional model is built to analyze the input/output of plant maintenance, which is processed as a service system, and DEA is applied as a calculate model for plant maintenance evaluation. Practical implications. The aim of this work is to provide management with a method to evaluate and quantify the relative efficiency of plant maintenance among a group of units. The maintenance pattern, scheme and experience of the relatively effective unit are guidance to others in improving themselves in plant maintenance and the quantified evaluation result points out the detailed maintenance limitation of relatively less efficient units so that the management can make corresponding improvement scheme.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Shourav Dutta, Trapa Biswas, Md. Akhter Hossain, Md. Rayhanur Rahman, Saddam Hossen and Mohammed Kamal Hossain

This study/paper aims to evaluate the floral richness of the central part of Chattogram city, Bangladesh. Chattogram is recognized as the largest port city and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study/paper aims to evaluate the floral richness of the central part of Chattogram city, Bangladesh. Chattogram is recognized as the largest port city and the commercial capital of Bangladesh, which confronts faster urbanization and swift infrastructure development. Green spaces in and around Chattogram city are shrinking sharply, which resulted in rapid loss of floral and faunal resources in this area. The present study was carried out from February 2018 to January 2019 to enumerate the vascular plant species of the Sulakbahar ward located in the central part of Chattogram City, Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

The study area was categorized into 10 habitats to assess the variation of floral composition. The extensive whole area survey method was applied to record the flora from all sorts of plant habitats of the research area.

Findings

The study enumerated 418 vascular plant species under 315 genera and 120 families including natural, planted and cultivated from the study area. The habit form of the recorded plant composition indicated that herbs (35%) constitute the major plant category followed by trees (34%), shrubs (17%), climbers (12%), ferns (1%) and orchids (1%). The study also indicated that exotic species (50.3%) became dominant than native species (49.7%) in Chattogram city because of their scenic beauty, easy propagation and ornamental value to the city planners and inhabitants.

Originality/value

It appeared that floral resources of the Chattogram city area are in great threat due to aggressive and unplanned infrastructure development for housing, offices and institutions by replacing the green spaces. The study recommended that urgent protection measures should be taken to conserve and protect the existing floral resources for the well-being of the urban people.

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Ecofeminism and Climate Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2633-4062

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Janet Chang, Alastair M. Morrison, Ya-Ling Chen, Te-Yi Chang and Daniela Zih-Yu Chen

The research objectives were to: (1) examine the relationship among motivations, satisfaction and loyalty with plant-based food dining at destinations; (2) determine if…

Abstract

Purpose

The research objectives were to: (1) examine the relationship among motivations, satisfaction and loyalty with plant-based food dining at destinations; (2) determine if and how the attractiveness of eating plant-based foods moderates satisfaction and loyalty; and (3) investigate potential differences in visitor background information and consumption characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted at tourist attractions in southern Taiwan and 274 valid questionnaires were obtained. The relationships among motivations, satisfaction and loyalty were investigated when eating plant-based foods during travel. The moderating effects of food attractiveness on motivations and satisfaction/loyalty were measured.

Findings

The results indicated a positive relationship between motivations and satisfaction/loyalty in plant-based food dining. Motivations for plant-based food dining were comprised of four domains (physical, cultural, interpersonal and prestige) and satisfaction and loyalty had three (overall satisfaction, intention to revisit and intention to recommend).

Research limitations/implications

The major implications were that motivations had a significant effect on satisfaction and loyalty; food attractiveness did not moderate the effect of motivations on satisfaction/loyalty; and background characteristics influenced satisfaction and loyalty.

Practical implications

Marketers and strategic planners for plant-based restaurants or those with plant-based meal options must make a greater effort to understand the distinctive demographic and dietary characteristics of the people who comprise the core of this market.

Originality/value

This research adds to the very limited literature on plant-based and vegetarian dining in tourism destinations. Furthermore, it tests, partially validates and expands a model by Kim et al. (2009) for consuming local food while traveling. The findings also complement the considerable evidence linking motivations to satisfaction and loyalty when dining.

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British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Doris H. Kincade and Kate E. Annett-Hitchcock

In 1978, the once powerful US apparel industry was on the cusp of change, and the consulting firm KSA conducted a Delphi survey of apparel executives’ predictions into the…

Abstract

Purpose

In 1978, the once powerful US apparel industry was on the cusp of change, and the consulting firm KSA conducted a Delphi survey of apparel executives’ predictions into the 2000s. The purpose of this paper is to compare actual changes over the subsequent decades with these 1978 expert predictions and explore the accuracy/inaccuracy of these “educated guesses” (KSA, 1978, p. 1).

Design/methodology/approach

The chorographic method was used to analyze the report and document historical data. Chorography is “concerned with significance of place, regional characterization, [and] local history […]” (Rohl, 2012, p.1) and includes contextual settings and researcher input. Primary data were examined during each decade and included: industry literature, government documents and labor data. The researchers used content analysis to reduce and organize data.

Findings

Findings cover three decades of Southeast US apparel industry data including imports, employment, number of plants, size of plants and productivity. Predictions were inaccurate about imports, predicted to be minor in comparison with domestic production, which they actually surpassed. Predicted decrease in employment was similar to actual decrease but reasons were inaccurate. Change in number and size of plants were over-predicted and under-predicted. Reasons given by experts were automation and government intervention; in actuality, limited automation occurred with insignificant impact in contrast to outsourcing, which decimated employment in US plants. Steady increase in productivity was predicted when productivity often decreased.

Originality/value

Previous studies focus on the textile sector; studies of the apparel sector tend to be regional or topical. This study is more expansive and provides insight into predictions and changes made in the US apparel industry at a critical time in its near demise. With the current climate of global change and increased market uncertainty, insights from this study may provide direction for rethinking of the domestic apparel industry for the USA and other developed countries.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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