Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2016

Xu Zhang, Mingling Zhai, Yanyan Wang, Yulei Gao, Haoliang Zhao, Xiang Zhou and Jun Gao

In order to verify the feasibility of different techniques, this chapter further studies the adaptability of two massive straw biomass applications in rural areas in China.

Abstract

Purpose

In order to verify the feasibility of different techniques, this chapter further studies the adaptability of two massive straw biomass applications in rural areas in China.

Methodology/approach

The methods of assessing biomass power generation project with Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), survey and field test of one biogas station, and game-theoretic analysis are adopted.

Findings

The following conclusions can be drawn: The air pollution costs account for more than 60% of the total environmental cost, followed by depreciation expense and maintenance fee of 18%, compared to that of biomass power generation at 0.01711 CNY/kWh. The adopted greenhouse sunlight technology of Solar Biogas Plant in Xuzhou, China, raises the inside average temperature by 11.0 °C higher than outside and keeps the pool temperature above 16 °C in winter, ensuring a gas productivity of biogas project in winter up to 0.5–0.7 m3/m3 by volume. This chapter also analyzes the information cost incurred by asymmetric information in biomass power generation via game theory method and illustrates the information structure with game results. It provides not only a foundation for the policy research in promoting straw power generation but also theoretical framework to solve the problem of straw collection.

Social implications

These studies will propose solutions to relevant problems arisen in the running process.

Originality/value

These studies are all based on real cases, field research, and appropriate theoretical analyses, so, they can reduce the relevant costs and promote the application of relevant technologies.

Details

China and Europe’s Partnership for a More Sustainable World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-331-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Emilia Mary Bălan, Laura Mariana Cismaș and Cristina Georgiana Zeldea

Introduction: Climate change and the limiting nature of fossil natural resources are compelling elements that have driven the search for environmentally friendly…

Abstract

Introduction: Climate change and the limiting nature of fossil natural resources are compelling elements that have driven the search for environmentally friendly alternatives to the traditional economy. In this context, as the main pillar of bioeconomy, biomass can contribute to energy sustainability, temper effects of climate change, and make the use of natural resources more efficiently. Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries have a relatively common economic history of agriculture playing a pivotal role in the former centralized economy. Purpose: This chapter analyzed the importance of biomass produced from residues of crops in CEE countries. This analysis is regarded as incentive to take a deeper look at biomass in CEE countries with acknowledged agricultural potential. CEE countries have been part of the former European socialist bloc, with agriculture being a core component of the centralized economy. Even though their economies have been undergoing a lengthy transition process to the market economy, this sector of activity still holds a significant share. Therefore, CEE countries provide a suitable ground for our analysis. Methodology: The authors selected characteristics of the agricultural sectors and development, and assess their relationship with biomass production in the CEE countries, using an Ordinary Least Squares method. Then, the authors investigate the environmental implications of crop biomass production in a similar framework. Findings: The results reveal that the agricultural biomass sector contributes to economic development, and it does not have negative implications for environmental indicators. These results show that biomass production is a sustainable target to be pursued.

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Bright Akwasi Gyamfi, Divine Q. Agozie, Murad A. Bein, Festus Victor Bekun and Festus Fatai Adedoyin

Discussions on environment-friendly production connected with the concerns of growing biomass emissions have gained much attention. In this regard, this study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Discussions on environment-friendly production connected with the concerns of growing biomass emissions have gained much attention. In this regard, this study aims to explore the issue of biomass energy consumption and its related emission effects on the economic and environmental well-being of the economy of Cyprus.

Design/methodology/approach

This study sources time series data on specific variables from the Global Material Flow and the World Bank’s World Development Indicators (WDI, 2020) between 1990 and 2016. The Robust least square (ROB-L2) in conjunction with Pesaran autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) methodology analysis techniques was used in addition to the Granger causality tests to examine the direction of causality flow between the variables under consideration.

Findings

The results indicate that biomass energy usage in the long run reduces pollution and negatively correlates with CO2 emissions level. Also, the decline of emission is influenced by increased foreign direct investment (FDI), thus, activities of foreign investors contribute to combating emission in the country. According to empirical results, non-renewable energy consumption showed both positive and negative influences on increased emission level, whereas economic growth is increasing carbon dioxide emission for the case of Cyprus.

Originality/value

This study applies current reliable data that offers renewed insights and sheds light on the state of affairs on biomass utilization from a developing country perspective. Additionally, it extends the discourse on the impact of biomass utilization on CO2 emissions by considering the impact of FDI, trade flow and energy consumption in a carbon-income function built on the liner version of the environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis. Although this is by no means exhaustive, the study pioneers the discourse on how FDI with biomass utilization among other relevant variables influences carbon dioxide emission.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 October 2021

Vandit Vijay, Ram Chandra and P.M.V. Subbarao

To better understand bioenergy's role in sustainable rural development and cleaner environment, it is necessary to place it in a local regional context. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

To better understand bioenergy's role in sustainable rural development and cleaner environment, it is necessary to place it in a local regional context. This paper aims to provide a conceptual approach for biomass-based energy self-sufficiency in rural areas of developing and underdeveloped countries having a strong agricultural sector. It further provides a framework for the estimation of surplus biomass and bioenergy potential and the biomass power emissions in a rural area.

Design/methodology/approach

A detailed approach is laid out to attain energy self-sufficiency in rural areas encompassing identification of surplus biomass resources in a selected area, suitable conversion technologies, consideration of local end-use priorities, skill development and monitoring of the project.

Findings

Following the novel approach proposed in this paper a case study analysis for Thanagazi block (Alwar District, India) is done, and it is observed that locally available biomass in the block can substitute more than 75% of the conventional energy demand and save 78% emissions vis-à-vis equivalent coal power. This indicates that creating local bioenergy production system as a means of substituting/complementing fossil energy can contribute to a cleaner self-sufficient ecosystem.

Originality/value

Biomass is a spatio-temporal resource. Prior works have looked at bioenergy potential for national or state levels; however, granular data to reveal a more realistic outlook in a rural area is the novelty of this work. Furthermore, biomass assessment studies largely focus on crop residual biomass, whereas the present study also includes livestock manure assessment which is a major resource in rural areas. This paper highlights the need and the approach for exploring locally available biomass to meet the local energy demands for clean energy security while considering the involvement of the local population in bioenergy planning and implementation.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Yanyan Fu, Xianguo Hu, Yufu Xu, Xifeng Zhu and Shaotong Jiang

When carrying out bioremediation of water polluted by biomass‐oil, the stains which can degrade the biomass‐oil efficiently should first be found. The purpose of this…

432

Abstract

Purpose

When carrying out bioremediation of water polluted by biomass‐oil, the stains which can degrade the biomass‐oil efficiently should first be found. The purpose of this paper is to describe how adopted acclimation through the isolated strains degraded efficiently, and got reaction kinetics property.

Design/methodology/approach

During the acclimation, the biodegradation process of biomass‐oil is accorded approximately with the first‐order reaction by the way of Sturm method which is described by measuring CO2 volume from the microbes' production.

Findings

One kind of microbe, Aspergillus versicolor, separated from the activated sludge in the aeration tanks of paper‐mill, is found to have the advantage of biodegradation in case of biomass‐oil from rice straw by rapid thermal‐liquidizing process. The biodegradation ability could be improved in aqueous culture under neutral and acidic conditions. The optimal temperature for biodegradation of biomass‐oil is 40°C. The optimal inocula content for biodegradation of biomass‐oil was 16 vol%.

Research limitations/implications

The variation of lubricity of biomass‐oil with biodegradation needs more attention.

Practical implications

A basic research on the growth of a strain is shown, which is helpful for the biological treatment of biomass‐oil pollution.

Originality/value

One kind of fungi, Aspergillus versicolor, can be used for the biodegradation of biomass‐oil. The effects of various conditions or parameters on biodegradation of biomass‐oil are discovered in aqueous culture conditions in the case of Aspergillus versicolor.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 61 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2020

Inmaculada García-Maroto, Francisco Muñoz-Leiva, Elena Higueras-Castillo and Francisco Liébana-Cabanillas

Understanding the antecedents of biomass heating adoption by domestic users is important for both public authorities and businesses because of the impact of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding the antecedents of biomass heating adoption by domestic users is important for both public authorities and businesses because of the impact of this technology on energy consumption. The purpose of this study offers an overview of the predictors of biomass adoption based on the most relevant theories, gleaned from pro-environmental decision-making research.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model was tested using the partial least squares technique. The study was conducted with a sample of 528 owners of detached houses who did not use biomass technology.

Findings

The results showed that intention to adopt this type of heating system is determined by individual values, environmental concerns, attitudes, perceived control, personal and social norms, perceptions of the technology’s attributes, of the benefits of biomass and access to economic aid.

Practical implications

Companies in the biomass heating sector (manufacturers, installers, biomass producers and distributors) and public bodies should take a proactive approach toward the economic and environmental situations they currently face.

Social implications

Economic aid or subsidies should be made available to influence the adoption intention of potential owners; and the availability of the aid and the requirements that must be met to access, it should be publicized through advertisement campaigns.

Originality/value

This study includes comprehensive academic and managerial implications crucial for the introduction of domestic biomass heating systems.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2013

Erik Trømborg, Torjus F. Bolkesjø and Birger Solberg

Second-generation biofuel is regarded as a sustainable alternatives to fossil energy in transportation where electricity is not feasible. The main purpose of this study is…

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Abstract

Purpose

Second-generation biofuel is regarded as a sustainable alternatives to fossil energy in transportation where electricity is not feasible. The main purpose of this study is to analyze how large-scale second-generation biofuel based on wood may affect the competitiveness of more mature bioenergy technologies such as bioheat through competition in the biomass market. The impacts on forest industries are also included.

Design/methodology/approach

An economic model for the energy and forest sectors based on partial equilibrium modeling is used to quantify the impacts of four different locations of biofuel production in Norway.

Findings

The results show that there are regional variations in biomass price effects depending on local raw material availability and costs of transport and import. Technologies allowing for a larger variety of wood biomass qualities will face lower biomass prices than technologies using only one species as raw material, causing less reduction in the production of bioheat and forest industrial products. For Norway specifically, the paper concludes that even if there is a potential for both increased bioheat generation and large-scale biofuel production, the production of second-generation biofuels based on domestic wood resources will cause a 5-20 percent reduction in bioheat generation depending on the scale of biofuel production.

Research limitations/implications

This study demonstrates how impacts on biomass markets from establishment of biofuel production vary quite substantially with location, production level and choice of feedstock. One main finding is the quite large biomass cost impact that is seen in the model runs when introducing large-scale biofuel production. Increased biomass costs reduce the profitability and this must be taken into account when establishing a biofuel installation.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper is the analyses of biofuel impacts with a detailed model for biomass supply as the bioenergy and forest sectors.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Ershad Ali

This paper examines, based on certain criteria, the most feasible sustainable energy technology (SET) for rural Bangladesh. The criteria used for the appropriateness of…

Abstract

This paper examines, based on certain criteria, the most feasible sustainable energy technology (SET) for rural Bangladesh. The criteria used for the appropriateness of SET for rural Bangladesh are: (a) availability of energy resources, (b) degree of technological complexity of the proposed technology, (c) cost effectiveness, (d) balance between supply of and demand for energy, (e) contribution of the particular energy technology to reducing greenhouse gas emission, and (f) major constraints associated with accepting the recommended technology. The paper describes the theoretical part of the author's Ph.D. thesis where fundamental work has been done. The study applies the criteria to three main energy technologies‐ biomass, solar and wind‐ and finds that none of these technologies are suitable on their own. However, among the three proposed energy technologies, biomass might be the best possible option which can make a positive contribution to alleviate energy poverty in rural Bangladesh. Findings of this study are useful for development policy makers and researchers.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Martin Svanberg and Árni Halldórsson

One way of overcoming logistics barriers (poor transportation, handling and storage properties) towards increased utilisation of biomass is to introduce a pre‐treatment…

Abstract

Purpose

One way of overcoming logistics barriers (poor transportation, handling and storage properties) towards increased utilisation of biomass is to introduce a pre‐treatment process such as torrefaction early in the biomass‐to‐energy supply chain. Torrefaction offers a range of potentially beneficial logistics properties but the actual benefits depend upon how the supply chain is configured to address various elements of customer demand. Hence, the aim of this paper is to develop a framework for torrefaction configuration in a supply chain perspective for different types of customers.

Design/methodology/approach

Sophisticated pre‐treatment processes are yet to reach the commercialisation phase. Identification of possible supply chain configurations is in this paper done through a conceptual approach by bringing together knowledge from related research fields such as unrefined forest fuel, pellets and coal logistics with prescriptions for configuration derived from the subject area of supply chain management (SCM).

Findings

A framework that explicates different elements of supply and demand of torrefaction is proposed, and exemplified by three distinct supply chains. Depending on demand, torrefaction serves different purposes, bridging gaps in place, time, quality and ownership. Furthermore, different supply chain configurations will pose different requirements on torrefaction in terms of producing different product quality, durability, energy density and hydrophobicity of the pellets.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed framework entails a set of propositions, but requires further development through empirical studies using complementary research methods such as interviews or surveys and quantification through techno‐economical or optimisation from a supply chain perspective.

Practical implications

This paper provides a framework that can inform decisions makers in biomass‐to‐energy supply chains, in particular at torrefaction plants, on upstream and downstream implications of their decisions.

Originality/value

The findings have implications for biomass‐to‐energy supply chains in general, and in particular, the paper provides a supply chain perspective of pre‐treatment processes, where previous research has focused primarily on technical aspects of torrefaction.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Joanne Tingey‐Holyoak and John D. Pisaniello

This paper aims to provide a view on the implications of large‐scale increases in demand for biomass production on water storage behaviours. In climates of high…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a view on the implications of large‐scale increases in demand for biomass production on water storage behaviours. In climates of high variability in rainfall, the pressures on farmers to build up on‐farm surface water supplies to the detriment of communities and businesses downstream is already present. Therefore, the added water storage pressures that arise from future demands for biomass need to be investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint presents a review of the issues surrounding the forecast for demand for agriculturally produced biomass and the increased demands on surface water storage created. The paper then presents the problem of unfair and unsafe water storage in agriculture through a review of the surrounding literature and policy in place in Australia.

Findings

The paper finds that if predicted skyrocketing future demand for biomass production for energy eventuates, then surface water on‐farm storages would be placed at increased risk as farmers experience pressure to store more water than they are entitled to. Increased demands from biomass production could mean that surrounding communities suffer increased threat from unfair water sharing in times of drought, and unsafe water storage in times of flood.

Practical implications

Policy should be developed rapidly to address the current unsustainable water storage management practices of farmers and sustainable biomass production. Water management behaviour certification should be introduced immediately to counter the risk of over storage in light of the demands of the future.

Originality/value

The paper provides an overview of the issues surrounding unfair and unsafe on farm water storage in dams in climate extremes placed in the context of a new and emerging demand on farmers to produce in an unsustainable manner.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000