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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2022

Julia Wojciechowska-Solis and Magdalena Śmiglak-Krajewska

The purpose of this paper was to determine the profile of dairy product consumers in the organic market.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to determine the profile of dairy product consumers in the organic market.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was based on a survey questionnaire developed by the author and administered to a total of 1,108 respondents. The statistical analysis (including descriptive statistics, the analysis of the discriminative function and the Chi2 test was performed with the use of Statistica 13.1 PL. The respondents’ gender was the factor behind the differences in how they behaved.

Findings

The consumers indicated the channels they rely upon to find information on organic dairy products; in addition to trusting the opinions of their family members and experts, they also use web platforms. Further, they specified their preferred locations for buying favorite products during the pandemic: specialized organic food shops, large distribution chains and online stores.

Practical implications

These outcomes will help in identifying target consumer segments and information channels for specific information and advertising messages. They also form an important resource for developing some potential strategies which the supply chain stakeholders could implement to promote organic consumption of dairy products.

Originality/value

This study identifies consumers’ preferred dairy products; motives for purchasing organic dairy products; barriers that consumers believe exist in the market; sources of knowledge about products purchased by consumers; and consumers’ preferred channels for purchasing organic dairy products. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study of dairy product consumers in the organic market in Poland.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2022

Anil Kumar Dixit, Smita Sirohi, K.M. Ravishankar, A.G. Adeeth Cariappa, Shiv Kumar, Gunjan Bhandari, Adesh K. Sharma, Amit Thakur, Gaganpreet Kaur Bhullar and Arti Thakur

The purpose of the study is to identify the factors affecting the entrepreneur's choice of the dairy value chain and evaluate the impact of the value chain on farm…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to identify the factors affecting the entrepreneur's choice of the dairy value chain and evaluate the impact of the value chain on farm performance (profit).

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected from dairy entrepreneurs in India, covering nine states. A multinomial treatment effect model (controlling for selection bias and endogeneity) was used to evaluate the impact of the choice of the value chain on entrepreneurs' profit.

Findings

Dairy entrepreneurs operating in any recognized value chain other than the value chain driven by the consumer household realize a comparatively lesser profit. Dairy farmers have established direct linkages with customers in urban areas – who could pay premium prices for safe and quality milk. Food safety compliance is positively associated with profit and entrepreneurs (who have undergone formal training in dairying) preferred partnerships with a formal value chain. The prospects of starting a dairy enterprise are slightly higher in villages compared to urban areas.

Research limitations/implications

Dairy entrepreneurs can make a shift in accordance with the study's findings and boost their profitability. It aids in comprehending how trainees (who obtained advice and training for raising dairy animals from R&D organizations) and non-trainee dairy farmers make value chain selections, which ultimately affect profitability. However, purposive sampling and a small sample size limit the universal implications of the study.

Social implications

Developing entrepreneurial behavior and startup culture is at the center of policymaking in India. The findings imply that the emerging value chain not only enhances the profit of dairy farmers by resolving consumer concerns about food safety and the quality of milk and milk products but also builds consumer trust.

Originality/value

This paper offers insight into how the benefits of dairy entrepreneurs vary with their participation in the different value chains. The impact of skill development/training programs on value chain selection and farm profitability has not yet been fully understood. Here is an attempt to fill this gap. This paper through light on how trained and educated dairy entrepreneurs are able to establish a territorial market by approaching premium customers – this is an addition to the existing literature.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Shane Adcock

Discusses the recent trend in the dairy industry towards conglomeration, focusing on the implications for the New Zealand dairy export industry. Describes how a proposed…

Abstract

Discusses the recent trend in the dairy industry towards conglomeration, focusing on the implications for the New Zealand dairy export industry. Describes how a proposed merger of the New Zealand dairy group and Kiwi cooperative dairies (both producer cooperatives) and the Dairy Board (which handled all overseas marketing of New Zealand dairy products) was rejected by the Commerce Commission and discusses the subsequent intervention by the Government in favor of the merger and the formation of a new company, provisionally termed “GlobalCo”. Investigates what dairy farmers desire from the New Zealand Government in the form of legislation and regulation, proposing the following research questions: what are dairy farmers’ perceptions of the dairy merger; how do government regulations affect dairy farmers’ operations; and what are dairy farmers perceptions of government assistance in the industry? Using a holistic‐inductive qualitative study with a sample collected through various contacts in the dairy industry, including farms from the lower half of North Island and all of the South Island, presents findings and outlines implications concerning the government and management at GlobalCo.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 105 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Alan S. Khade and Scott K. Metlen

The dairy industry has been changing rapidly owing to competitive pressures since the early 1980s. Basic operations in most dairies are being continuously improved. Deals…

5631

Abstract

The dairy industry has been changing rapidly owing to competitive pressures since the early 1980s. Basic operations in most dairies are being continuously improved. Deals with an application of a benchmarking process in a dairy firm. The calving operation is one of the most complex and significantly profitable operations in the dairy industry. Owing to a high mortality rate, the dairies are likely to lose in several ways, including profitability. Therefore, reducing the mortality rate will result in a significant increase in the efficiency of the operation. Describes details of the benchmarking process as they apply to the calving operation. Data were collected and analysed for a large dairy firm in California. Presents the results of the benchmarking process and recommendations.

Details

Benchmarking for Quality Management & Technology, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1351-3036

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 December 2022

Andrei Bonamigo, Louise Generoso Rosa, Camila Guimarães Frech and Herlandí de Souza Andrade

The purpose of this study is to recognize the empirical inhibitors of knowledge management (KM)in value co-creation in the dairy production context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to recognize the empirical inhibitors of knowledge management (KM)in value co-creation in the dairy production context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study undertook a qualitative multiple-case study strategy. The datas collected comes from five players in the dairy sector that jointly co-create value. In addition to in-depth interviews with the actors, this study considers complementary documents, with reports, management flowcharts. Content analysis was conducted based on Bardin (2011).

Findings

This study identified three empirical barriers for KM in managing value co-creation in dairy production. The inhibitors observed were related to ineffective communication among stakeholders, organizational culture and high competitiveness. This study identified that sharing and KM among actors is a way to stimulate innovative solutions via value co-creation in dairy production.

Research limitations/implications

This study explores the context in the Center-South of Brazil; therefore, it is not generalizable.

Practical implications

The findings help the managers to deal with the KM inhibitors in the value co-creation context and define actions based on the strategies listed to overcome the barriers identified in dairy production. This study can also help managers to change the mindset of organizations by adding KM to the organizational culture, as it identifies existing barriers in the sector and contributes by suggesting attitudes and tools capable of overcoming such difficulties.

Social implications

Professionals in the dairy sector, especially the small rural producer, can have access to knowledge and professional training through the value co-creation among actors in the dairy sector. In this sense, the milk quality, for example, the nutritional characteristics and traceability of the milk, can be improved for the final consumer.

Originality/value

This study reveals the empirical inhibitors of KM presents in the value co-creation in the dairy production context. Additionally, insights to deal with the lack of sharing information and knowledge among multiple actors.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 April 2012

Reidar Almås and Jostein Brobakk

Purpose – Dairy has been the backbone of agriculture in regional Norway, and the processing of milk has been dominated by co-operatives owned by milk farmers. During the…

Abstract

Purpose – Dairy has been the backbone of agriculture in regional Norway, and the processing of milk has been dominated by co-operatives owned by milk farmers. During the social democratic order (1945–1979), productivist agriculture thrived, while a more multifunctional agriculture was developed after 1980. As a measure against overproduction, a quota system was introduced in 1983. The purpose of this study is to see if there are signs of a neo-productivism revival after climate change and other global shocks, like the food crisis, featured prominently on the political agenda.

Design/methodology/approach – The chapter reviews the radical structural changes in Norwegian dairy production since the early 1960s, which reduced the number of milk farms radically from 148,000 in 1959 to almost 16,000 in 2009. According to the Agricultural Agreement between the Norwegian government and the farmers' organisations, the co-operatives are given an important semi-public role as market-price regulators and stock keepers. This Norwegian system may be described as a classical regulated dairy regime. The Norwegian dairy regime has been through several deregulations and re-regulations over the last 20 years, partly forced by internal pressures and partly inspired by liberalisation tendencies abroad.

Findings – After mid-1990s, there has been an increase in the number of joint dairy farms, where individual ownership of land is maintained while herds, buildings and machinery are merged. Three thousand six hundred thirty dairy farmers are now participating in 1,510 joint farming firms, producing 29 per cent of the milk in Norway. This rapid growth of joint farming is transforming the dairy sector in Norway. Analysis has shown that its evolution is closely tied to farmer socio-economic demands, including social benefits, such as increased leisure time, and security during illness. While there has been pressure to increase productivity, the food crisis changed attitudes, making the current policy of import tariffs and subsidies easier to defend.

Originality/value – This chapter shows that neo-liberalism in Norway was not pursued as far as in most other OECD countries, although some deregulation was taking place. Norwegian agricultural policies are still regulating the sector to a substantial degree, with the annual Agricultural Agreement negotiations serving as a centrepiece. Norway has ambitious climate goals, and by 2020 greenhouse gases emissions should be reduced to 30 per cent of the 1990 rate. A further goal is that Norway will be carbon neutral by 2030. As part of the implementation of its climate policy, a White Paper on agriculture and climate change was put forward in May 2009. For Norwegian food production as a whole, a change towards more grazing at the expense of crops would improve carbon storage and reduce the overall use of fertiliser. Such a shift in land use would benefit the dairy sector, in part because of easier access to domestically grown cow feed.

Details

Rethinking Agricultural Policy Regimes: Food Security, Climate Change and the Future Resilience of Global Agriculture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-349-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Huat Bin (Andy) Ang and Arch G. Woodside

This study applies asymmetric rather than conventional symmetric analysis to advance theory in occupational psychology. The study applies systematic case-based analyses to…

Abstract

This study applies asymmetric rather than conventional symmetric analysis to advance theory in occupational psychology. The study applies systematic case-based analyses to model complex relations among conditions (i.e., configurations of high and low scores for variables) in terms of set memberships of managers. The study uses Boolean algebra to identify configurations (i.e., recipes) reflecting complex conditions sufficient for the occurrence of outcomes of interest (e.g., high versus low financial job stress, job strain, and job satisfaction). The study applies complexity theory tenets to offer a nuanced perspective concerning the occurrence of contrarian cases – for example, in identifying different cases (e.g., managers) with high membership scores in a variable (e.g., core self-evaluation) who have low job satisfaction scores and when different cases with low membership scores in the same variable have high job satisfaction. In a large-scale empirical study of managers (n = 928) in four (contextual) segments of the farm industry in New Zealand, this study tests the fit and predictive validities of set membership configurations for simple and complex antecedent conditions that indicate high/low core self-evaluations, job stress, and high/low job satisfaction. The findings support the conclusion that complexity theory in combination with configural analysis offers useful insights for explaining nuances in the causes and outcomes to high stress as well as low stress among farm managers. Some findings support and some are contrary to symmetric relationship findings (i.e., highly significant correlations that support main effect hypotheses).

Details

Improving the Marriage of Modeling and Theory for Accurate Forecasts of Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-122-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 April 2012

Paul Stock and Susan Peoples

Purpose – This study compares the arrival of large-scale dairy farming in two New Zealand regions since 1984 with a particular focus on the competition between sheep…

Abstract

Purpose – This study compares the arrival of large-scale dairy farming in two New Zealand regions since 1984 with a particular focus on the competition between sheep farming and dairy farming.

Design/methodology/approach – The case study draws on qualitative interviews with 58 farmers in two regions.

Findings – We identify and compare the changing economic, social and cultural hierarchies in and between the two regions.

Originality/value – This study extends a typical political economic comparison by emphasising the changes in social and cultural capital as a result of the changing economic conditions in the country and the regions.

Details

Rethinking Agricultural Policy Regimes: Food Security, Climate Change and the Future Resilience of Global Agriculture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-349-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2016

Svetlana Saksonova and Irēna Kantāne

This study aims to research examples of mergers and acquisitions of European and Latvian dairy firms, the motivation for these transactions and their results, and to show…

Abstract

This study aims to research examples of mergers and acquisitions of European and Latvian dairy firms, the motivation for these transactions and their results, and to show that mergers and acquisitions had a positive impact on the development of the dairy industry overall and on specific firms by increasing their competitiveness.

The authors analyze the reasons for, as well as the meaning and impact of, mergers and acquisitions on firm development, focusing on the example of dairy companies in Europe, and subsequently on these processes in Latvian dairy industry.

The study is based on the qualitative and quantitative analysis of firm financial reports as well as reports of the International Dairy Federation, publications of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, annual reports of the International Farm Comparison Network, reports on the dairy industry in the European Union, Latvian Central Union of Dairy Producers, Lursoft firm registry data, as well as reports of the Ministry of Agriculture, and Latvian Farm Consultation and Education center.

The study relies on statistical comparisons of firm operations before mergers or acquisitions as well as during the process and afterwards. This allows identifying the impact of mergers itself on particular firms or the industry, while abstracting from exogenous factors. Mergers and acquisitions in Latvian dairy industry had begun in 2011 and continued until 2013. However, the geopolitical situation in Europe in 2015 had fully offset the positive impact of this process. The deterioration in the geopolitical climate due to developments in Russian–Ukrainian relations has had a big impact on the economic processes affecting the development strategy of dairy firms.

This study finds that often the problems of firm development are related to the lack of financial management especially deficiencies in decision making about firm mergers and acquisitions.

Historical and statistical analysis as well as comparisons of successful experiences in Europe and Latvia allows the authors to conclude that in evaluating decisions on the possibilities for mergers and acquisitions Latvian firms have to be guided by the most important results of this process: possible increases in foreign direct investment and the growth in market share. This will, in turn, give the firms an opportunity to acquire new technologies, reorganize manufacturing processes, and start producing goods with larger value added. Ultimately, this will allow increasing firm values.

Details

Contemporary Issues in Finance: Current Challenges from Across Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-907-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2017

Bruce Muirhead

The chapter will document the Canadian reaction, as reflected in the demand of New Zealand, that Canada fundamentally alters its dairy supply management system in order to…

Abstract

The chapter will document the Canadian reaction, as reflected in the demand of New Zealand, that Canada fundamentally alters its dairy supply management system in order to participate in the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations. The Canadian government has resolutely refused to do so, supported wholeheartedly by dairy farmers throughout the country. This is in part because of the effect such an action would have on rural spaces and the debilitating result it would have on Canadian dairy production. As well, the chapter will address the issue of the cost of dairy products in New Zealand as compared with Canada. Part of this analysis will focus on the role of supermarkets in determining the price structure of milk in both Canada and New Zealand. Finally, the chapter will offer an examination of the New Zealand system as represented by Fonterra and the Canadian system as epitomized by dairy supply management.

1 – 10 of over 8000