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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Kelly Marie Blanchat

This case study aims to demonstrate how proactive use of KBART guidelines can assist librarians in the analysis and restoration of journal titles with post-cancellation…

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to demonstrate how proactive use of KBART guidelines can assist librarians in the analysis and restoration of journal titles with post-cancellation perpetual access.

Design/methodology/approach

After experiencing a 25-per cent decrease in the collection budget, the Queens College Libraries (QCL) faced losing electronic journal content with cancellations to Big Deal licensing agreements. By using tools such as Serials Solutions, Ex Libris SFX and Microsoft Excel, the library was able to optimize KBART guidelines to analyze and restore journal titles under perpetual access licensing clauses. The implemented workflow mirrored the process to create “Big Deal” renewal spreadsheets at Springer Science + Business Media.

Findings

By using KBART guidelines to manipulate and analyze data, the library was efficiently able to identify journal titles for perpetual access. Because the resulting data were formatted within KBART guidelines, it could then be transferred to a knowledge base for enhanced content discovery.

Practical implications

While there are numerous variations on perpetual access rights across hundreds of vendors, the workflow developed at QCL can be replicated, or altered on a case-by-case basis. By highlighting the work necessary to implement perpetual access clauses, this article makes a case for both standardizing licensing clauses as well as increased vendor adoption of KBART guidelines.

Originality/value

This case study examines the workflow of an Electronic Resources librarian with vendor experience, the overlap of concerns between librarians and vendors, and the ways in which to analyze journal holdings without an automated system.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Magdalini Vasileiou, Richard Hartley and Jennifer Rowley

E‐books are an important and growing type of digital resource. Academic libraries have traditionally had a major role in selecting books and making them available to…

Abstract

Purpose

E‐books are an important and growing type of digital resource. Academic libraries have traditionally had a major role in selecting books and making them available to learners, scholars, and researchers. Therefore the processes and criteria that they apply in the selection and acquisition of e‐books may potentially have significant consequences for the future viability of e‐books as a product. This paper aims to report on research into the criteria and processes that academic libraries use to choose e‐books.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 27 librarians in seven academic libraries in the UK.

Findings

Academic libraries purchase e‐books from a portfolio of different vendors. In order to select the books and packages that they acquire they apply a number of criteria, including business models, licence, price, platform, interface, subject coverage, and match to reading lists. High on the list of librarians' concerns are: the variation in and complexity of business models for purchasing, licence variety and digital rights management (DRM) restrictions, and perceived high prices.

Originality/value

This study focuses directly and in depth on the buying and selection processes and criteria. Insights offered by this study may be of value to publishers, aggregators and librarians.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Paula Dehlez, Just de Leeuwe and Ronald Dekker

To discuss the recent strategic developments of Library at TU Delft.

Abstract

Purpose

To discuss the recent strategic developments of Library at TU Delft.

Design/methodology/approach

Developments at TU Delft are contrasted with the five key requirements for document delivery identified in an earlier article in 2001.

Findings

That the strategy in most libraries is to evolve rapidly to a digital library as far as possible. That there is still an important role for libraries as document suppliers. That much discussion between libraries and suppliers will be necessary in order to give document delivery a stable position within the digital library.

Originality/value

Gives an insight into the working and thinking of a major European document supplier operating from the Technical University in Delft.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2016

Cindy Pierard, Jason Shoup, Susanne K. Clement, Mark Emmons, Teresa Y. Neely and Frances C. Wilkinson

This chapter introduces Building Back Better Libraries (BBBL) as a critical concept for improved library planning both prior to and following a disaster or other…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter introduces Building Back Better Libraries (BBBL) as a critical concept for improved library planning both prior to and following a disaster or other emergency. Building Back Better, an idea widely discussed in the disaster recovery literature, seeks to use the difficulty of a disaster as an opportunity to go beyond the status quo and to promote changes that result in stronger, more resilient communities. The authors will define BBB elements and frameworks, building upon those to create a model for library disaster planning and recovery, and applying it to cases involving space and facilities, collections, services, and people.

Methodology/approach

Literature on the Building Back Better concept and frameworks, as well as library emergency response, was reviewed. This source material was used to develop a modified framework for improved library disaster planning and recovery. The Building Back Better Libraries framework is discussed and applied to cases involving library facilities and spaces, collections, and services, and its implementation through a disaster planning team is reviewed.

Findings

Though all libraries hope to avoid disaster, few succeed. One survey found that as many as 75% of academic library respondents had experienced a disaster or emergency. Evidence also suggests that few libraries are prepared, with as many as 66–80% of libraries reporting that they have no emergency plan with staff trained to carry it out. Even when plans are in place, the rush to respond to immediate needs following a disaster can overwhelm the ability to pursue effective long-term planning. Building Back Better, when framed for libraries, provides a planning tool to balance short-term response with long-term recovery and resilience. The Building Back Better Libraries framework focuses on the areas of risk assessment for library collections and spaces; recovery and rejuvenation for facilities, collections, and services; and implementation and monitoring, with particular discussion of the human element and the role of a library disaster planning team.

Practical implications

The proposed framework, Building Back Better Libraries (BBBL), can be used to strengthen disaster planning in a manner that balances meeting immediate needs with implementing longer term plans to create stronger and more resilient libraries.

Originality/value

Although aspects of BBB ideas are present in existing library literature, the concept is not formally defined for the library context.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Peter Burnett and Christina Seuring

Internet resources are increasing in number and importance. This paper reports on the practices and policies adopted for organising access to free Internet resources in a…

Abstract

Internet resources are increasing in number and importance. This paper reports on the practices and policies adopted for organising access to free Internet resources in a number of large university libraries and national libraries. References are given to some general printed literature on the topic as well as to websites exemplifying particular approaches. The paper is intended to give an impression of how libraries are integrating free Internet resources into their descriptions of information which their users can access, which resources should be included, and how they should be treated. It concentrates on the integration of free Internet resources, although the division of electronic resources into “free” and “paid for” is not usually made at the institutions studied.

Details

Program, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Debbie Price‐Ewen

Abstract

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Yeon‐Hee Park

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Korean consortia models generally and discuss how the consortium governing body, Korea Education & Research Information…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Korean consortia models generally and discuss how the consortium governing body, Korea Education & Research Information Service (KERIS), manages the e‐book consortium effectively from the Korean perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is conducted with overall consortia models of online resources by KERIS. Over several years of modeling it has contrived to develop a few consortia modeling patterns in Korea and assess their effectiveness on collection management. The e‐book consortium modeling process entailed the following: identifying the appropriate consortium model, sampling the consortium size for pricing models and selecting the criteria for e‐book title selection.

Findings

Two types of e‐book consortium models are presented. One is the subscription model and the other is the purchasing model. Both sharing and purchasing options are quite cost‐effective for Korean universities since they try to balance the digital and paper collections. The consortium model for e‐books in Korean universities was successful and fit into the conservative collection management in Korea for academic use. Also, perpetual access and purchase model is preferred rather than annual access and lease model.

Originality/value

Online resources including e‐books need a sustainable model for continuous access due to budget constraints. Considering the life‐span of information we need to find the appropriate business and service models for all the resources available online. Various criteria for consortia have been presented. No previous research has been conducted on the nationwide consortium model in Korean universities.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Kun‐Huang Huarng and Hui‐Chuan Winnie Wang

This paper aims to share the successful experiences and suggestions from the 2007 Chinese e‐books consortium.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to share the successful experiences and suggestions from the 2007 Chinese e‐books consortium.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of the participant libraries of the 2007 Chinese e‐books consortium was conducted. Survey results were analyzed.

Findings

The consortium improved the Chinese collections with perpetual ownership, and demonstrated the bargaining power that exists through a consortium. Most participants would consider joining the consortium in the future.

Research limitations/implications

Since the 2007 Chinese e‐books consortium has only just been completed, the usage statistics have not been compiled. It will be interesting to see how readers adapt to the Chinese e‐books in the future.

Practical implications

The results have practical implications for the operation of library consortia.

Originality/value

This study provides the latest opinions and suggestions from the consortium participants, which can be valuable to those who are interested in initiating new library consortia. The study results can also be of value to librarians who are considering joining any library consortia.

Details

Library Management, vol. 30 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Eva Sorrell and Manuel Urrizola

To report on the 20th North American Serials Interest Group held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in May 2005.

Abstract

Purpose

To report on the 20th North American Serials Interest Group held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in May 2005.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a concise review of the conference, whose theme was Roaring into our 20s.

Findings

A variety of topics of interest to serialists were covered in the programs through plenary, concurrent and workshop sessions.

Originality/value

This paper is a useful summary of a conference of interest to library and information management professionals.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Marianne Stowell Bracke and Jim Martin

Limited physical and financial resources and changing customer behaviors compelled the University of Arizona Science‐Engineering Library to pursue more flexible collection…

Abstract

Purpose

Limited physical and financial resources and changing customer behaviors compelled the University of Arizona Science‐Engineering Library to pursue more flexible collection management options, such as removing print copies of journals as the library purchased the electronic backfiles. The purpose of this paper is to describe a process used at the library to compare electronic journals to their print counterparts.

Design/methodology/approach

The library's approach was to study the electronic content provided through Elsevier's ScienceDirect for completeness and quality of text and images. This was to ensure that the removal of print would minimally impact library customers while reclaiming building space that could be better utilized to meet changing customer needs.

Findings

The process uncovered the reality that the electronic backfiles were not always adequate substitutes for print copies. In response, it was necessary to open a dialogue with the publisher to share the library's findings that resulted in improved electronic backfiles.

Originality/value

This paper weighs the advantages and disadvantages of taking a transformational approach to collection management.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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