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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Kelly Marie Blanchat

This case study aims to demonstrate how proactive use of KBART guidelines can assist librarians in the analysis and restoration of journal titles with post-cancellation

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to demonstrate how proactive use of KBART guidelines can assist librarians in the analysis and restoration of journal titles with post-cancellation perpetual access.

Design/methodology/approach

After experiencing a 25-per cent decrease in the collection budget, the Queens College Libraries (QCL) faced losing electronic journal content with cancellations to Big Deal licensing agreements. By using tools such as Serials Solutions, Ex Libris SFX and Microsoft Excel, the library was able to optimize KBART guidelines to analyze and restore journal titles under perpetual access licensing clauses. The implemented workflow mirrored the process to create “Big Deal” renewal spreadsheets at Springer Science + Business Media.

Findings

By using KBART guidelines to manipulate and analyze data, the library was efficiently able to identify journal titles for perpetual access. Because the resulting data were formatted within KBART guidelines, it could then be transferred to a knowledge base for enhanced content discovery.

Practical implications

While there are numerous variations on perpetual access rights across hundreds of vendors, the workflow developed at QCL can be replicated, or altered on a case-by-case basis. By highlighting the work necessary to implement perpetual access clauses, this article makes a case for both standardizing licensing clauses as well as increased vendor adoption of KBART guidelines.

Originality/value

This case study examines the workflow of an Electronic Resources librarian with vendor experience, the overlap of concerns between librarians and vendors, and the ways in which to analyze journal holdings without an automated system.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Arunima Krishna and Kelly S. Vibber

The purpose of this paper is to qualitatively understand the reactions of online publics to a victim cluster crisis as the crisis unfolds and offer a new way of tracking…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to qualitatively understand the reactions of online publics to a victim cluster crisis as the crisis unfolds and offer a new way of tracking online hot-issue publics using comments on online news articles.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a mixed-methods approach, employing both descriptive quantitative techniques and qualitative thematic analysis.

Findings

Qualitative analyses of online news comments on BuzzFeed and the Huffington Post revealed that publics’ reaction to the cyber-attack on Sony, the following threats of attack, and Sony’s response to it largely ran counter to the situational crisis communication theory’s (SCCT) assumptions about victim cluster crises. Analyses also revealed a pattern in the volume of comments on the two online news outlets, supporting the conceptualization of hot-issue publics growing and decreasing as news coverage of an issue rises and falls.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis was limited to one incident and two online media.

Practical implications

This paper provides empirical support for the use of online news comments to track hot-issue publics and what is important to them. In addition, tracking the tone and content of the comments allows for an examination of the fit of SCCT assumptions and provides a way for practitioners to understand public opinion and adapt communication plans based on insights gleaned from such data.

Originality/value

This study is one of few to provide empirical support for the conceptualization of hot-issue publics, and to do so using online news comments. In addition, it is one of very few to study the SCCT in real-world settings, examining real publics’ reactions to real issues.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Philip Mullen

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 29 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Michael Seadle

The purpose of this research is to investigate: how many journal titles are both in LOCKSS and in Portico?; what is the relationship of small publishers to LOCKSS/CLOCKSS…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate: how many journal titles are both in LOCKSS and in Portico?; what is the relationship of small publishers to LOCKSS/CLOCKSS and Portico?; and what is the relationship of large publishers to LOCKSS/CLOCKSS and Portico?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes how data from Portico, LOCKSS, and CLOCKSS were cleaned and analyzed using Perl programs to discover duplications.

Findings

The findings show a significant overlap among the archiving systems. They also show that Portico has no prejudice against small publishers and that large publishers are as willing to choose the LOCKSS software as to choose Portico. LOCKSS does, however, archive many more small and arguably endangered publishers and may be the only economically viable choice for them.

Originality/value

The push for greater transparency has made more and more data available. Both LOCKSS and Portico deserve commendation for providing the detailed lists of titles and publishers on which this paper was based. Such data give the library community an opportunity to build decisions about the long‐term digital future on firm and verifiable ground.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Philip Gust

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the benefits of integrating a digital preservation system into the library as a way to ensure uninterrupted access to e‐journals…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the benefits of integrating a digital preservation system into the library as a way to ensure uninterrupted access to e‐journals and e‐books.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces the concept of a digital preservation system, and shows how it can made to benefit end‐users through a simple integration with the online pubic access catalogue (OPAC), to ensure continuous access to a library's e‐journals and e‐books.

Findings

A digital preservation system ensures that libraries continue to have access to on‐line assets once a subscription is cancelled or the publisher discontinues access. It extends the traditional library model of print journals and books on the shelf to encompass digital media. Providing end‐user access to preserved content can be simplified by integrating the online public access catalogue (OPAC) with the digital preservation system through a link resolver. End‐users can access the preserved content using an interface they already know, and the integration guards against publisher outages to provide continuous access to the library's digital collection.

Practical implications

The techniques shown in this paper can be extended to integrating digital preservation systems with other library systems.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates a simple way for the library to ensure that end‐users have un‐interrupted access to digital assets, even if it is necessary to cancel a subscription or there is a temporary disruption in service from the publisher.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Angela Maranville and Karen Diaz

In recent years, a growing number of libraries have canceled or unbundled their “Big Deal” journal subscriptions – those subscriptions that include a full package of…

Abstract

In recent years, a growing number of libraries have canceled or unbundled their “Big Deal” journal subscriptions – those subscriptions that include a full package of digital journal titles for one discounted cost. This started as an affordability problem but has slowly morphed into a challenge from libraries demanding a new pricing structure that accommodates and spurs the growing open access movement.

The change has caused a variety of challenges for technical services units including the increased need for user data, increasingly complicated workflows as they manage partial subscriptions, new interactions with consortia, and ongoing campus conversations. Whether the library is seeking to simply unbundle due to budget constraints, or push for new models such as “read and publish”, there is a tremendous impact on the work of technical services units.

This chapter will explore the rationale and growth of the Big Deal, how it is breaking, four case studies on breaking Big Deals, a brief discussion of new transformative agreements, new challenges for consortia, and implications for technical services units moving forward.

Details

Technical Services in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-829-3

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Muzamil Mushtaq and Ariba Tausif

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the e-resource collection development practices of the engineering college libraries of Aligarh. The research includes budgeting…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the e-resource collection development practices of the engineering college libraries of Aligarh. The research includes budgeting, collection development policy, collection evaluation, sources of funds, modes of procurement, pricing models and other aspects related to collection development activity.

Design/methodology/approach

The descriptive method was used for conducting the study, in which a well-structured questionnaire was administered followed by interview of the librarians of six engineering college libraries under study.

Findings

It was found that these colleges are much more interested in focusing on building a strong e-resource collection in their libraries. During the past few years, the budget has also been increased in majority of libraries for the acquisition of e-resources. The study found that the major factors affecting the selection of electronic resources (e-resources) in these colleges are quality, subject coverage, license agreement and vendor support. It was also revealed that majority of libraries lack proper collection development policy, especially for e-resources. The study suggested that these libraries should build their collections keeping in mind the different areas of specializations of engineering studies and the contemporary changes in the field.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is restricted exclusively to the study of collection development process of e-resources and the librarians of six major engineering colleges of Aligarh as respondents.

Practical implications

This study has great importance for the librarians of the similar engineering colleges in India. The findings and suggestions of the study can help not only in understanding the engineering college librarianship and its current trends but can also help library professionals who are facing similar challenges in their libraries.

Originality/value

The present study is about the e-resource collection development practices followed in engineering colleges of Aligarh, which can serve as a pedestal for future studies in other academic and special libraries in India and elsewhere.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Catherine Anne Johnson and Samuel Cassady

The purpose of this study is to investigate the decision-making process of librarians at the University of Western Ontario who attempted to cancel the Wiley Big Deal. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the decision-making process of librarians at the University of Western Ontario who attempted to cancel the Wiley Big Deal. The aim of the study is to reveal the underlying factors that affected their decision-making process. By understanding the decision-making process of librarians, it may be possible to devise a system that takes into consideration not only quantitative factors but also the subjective or qualitative factors that impact librarians’ decisions and thus make it easier to cancel these Big Deals.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved administering an online survey to 25 librarians involved in the cancellation project. Follow-up interviews were conducted with 13 of these librarians to understand at a deeper and more nuanced level the factors that influenced their decisions.

Findings

The main finding was that the librarians who participated in the study could be divided into two groups – a data-driven criteria group and a subjective criteria group – based on their ranking of the factors used to make their cancellation decisions. Most librarians interviewed used a mixture of quantitative factors and qualitative factors when making their cancellation decisions. The authors found that those participants who had greater professional experience and a closer relationship with the faculties in their subject areas had more difficulty in cancelling journals. Very few librarians relied on quantitative data alone.

Originality/value

This study is one of few that have examined the subjective factors that influence librarians’ decisions regarding cancellation of Big Deals. It has implications regarding the movement towards centralized collection management and reliance on quantitative data alone when making collection decisions.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Amanda Kay Rinehart, Patrice-Andre Prud'homme and Andrew Reid Huot

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the importance of beginning digital preservation efforts with restricted resources.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the importance of beginning digital preservation efforts with restricted resources.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a case study approach, which is enhanced by advice from national experts in digital preservation.

Findings

This paper details how Milner Library digital preservation advocates have approached the task by seeking collaborations, speaking to administration, participating in national efforts and starting with small steps.

Research limitations/implications

As a case study, this paper is limited to one institution's experience with promoting digital preservation.

Practical implications

This paper reviews basic misconceptions about and challenges with digital preservation. Many smaller or mid-sized institutions are left out of the digital preservation conversation because they cannot begin to meet national standards with restricted resources.

Originality/value

This paper represents small and mid-sized institutions and the challenges of digital preservation. As well, the paper includes valuable insights from national experts in digital preservation.

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Mark Bide, Rajveen Dhiensa, Hugh Look, Charles Oppenheim and Steve Probets

This paper sets out to present a brief history of electronic licensing initiatives before considering current practices for managing licences to electronic resources. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to present a brief history of electronic licensing initiatives before considering current practices for managing licences to electronic resources. The intention is to obtain a detailed understanding of the requirements needed for a registry of electronic licences that will enable usage terms and conditions to be presented to end‐users at point of use.

Design/methodology/approach

Two extensive focus groups were held, each comprising representatives from the main stakeholder groups. These structured events considered existing and ongoing issues and approaches towards licence management and investigated a range of “use‐cases” where potential usages for a licence registry were outlined and discussed.

Findings

The results form part of a requirements gathering and analysis process which will inform the development of a registry of electronic licences. The work forms part of the JISC‐funded Registry of Electronic Licences (RELI) project.. The paper finds that there are many complexities when dealing with electronic licences such as licence specificity, licence interpretation, definitions of authorised users and dissemination of usage terms and conditions.

Practical implications

These issues and others are considered and the impact on a subsequent registry of electronic licences is discussed. It is clear from the findings that there is a real and immediate need for a licence registry.

Originality/value

The paper provides a rich picture of the concerns and practices adopted both when managing licences and when ensuring conformance with licences to electronic resources. The findings have enabled the scope of a licence registry to be determined. The registry is currently under development.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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