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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Cephas Odini

The definition and nature of planning are discussed and relatedmore specifically to the need for and problems of planning library andinformation services, especially in…

Abstract

The definition and nature of planning are discussed and related more specifically to the need for and problems of planning library and information services, especially in developing countries. The need for a dynamic as opposed to static planning process is stressed.

Details

Library Review, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Ownali Nurdin Mohamedali

Highlights some of the common problems of library planning in the Caribbean and elaborates on the steps involved in the marketing planning process. Responds to the desire…

Abstract

Highlights some of the common problems of library planning in the Caribbean and elaborates on the steps involved in the marketing planning process. Responds to the desire for further enlightenment on the subject of marketing planning expressed by some of the participants who attended a workshop on marketing planning for information professionals, which was organised by the Department of Library and Information Studies at the University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica. Discusses the various aspects of marketing planning which are of general interest and of interest to information professionals generally.

Details

New Library World, vol. 100 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Twila Camp, Barbara Laufersweiler and Sarah Robbins

Pre-project planning can be an important process for libraries managing large project portfolios. The process allows anyone within an organization to put forth a potential…

Abstract

Purpose

Pre-project planning can be an important process for libraries managing large project portfolios. The process allows anyone within an organization to put forth a potential project, and it clearly articulates the process both for developing an idea into a project and for approving and prioritizing projects.

Methodology/approach

Drawing from experience, the authors introduce a preliminary step for proposing projects before the project management principles are applied.

Findings

Benefits of the process include: promoting stakeholder input; preventing organizational overwhelm; documenting the library’s project portfolio; and improving communication, transparency, and decision-making. Libraries implementing this process should define a project for their organization, build buy-in among those involved, and ensure that approved projects advance library goals.

Originality/value

This chapter is largely practical and derived from experience. It provides an in-depth look at pre-project planning, a concept largely ignored in the project management literature.

Details

Project Management in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-837-4

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Gihani S. Rajapakse and K. Kiran

The purpose of this paper is to explore succession planning in academic libraries, specifically to understand how succession planning is carried out and how the…

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1131

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore succession planning in academic libraries, specifically to understand how succession planning is carried out and how the decisions-making styles of library managers influence each stage of the succession planning.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was used to gather data through a document analysis and interviews with library managers at four Sri Lankan university libraries. Data analysis was done applying the framework analysis (FA) tool.

Findings

The study revealed that succession planning has been practiced in Sri Lankan university libraries to develop a bench strength, skilled backup for key positions at all levels, while inculcating leadership competencies in their respective positions. The dominant decision style is the identifiable decision-making style within the succession planning process.

Research limitations/implications

The volume of the data obtained depends largely on the participants’ responses, and the interpretation of the data is subjected to minimum personal biasness of the researcher.

Practical implications

An understanding of how decision-making styles influence practices of succession planning contributes to assist library managers to carry out succession planning within the limitations of their autonomy to do so. The findings of this study benefit library managers in recognizing their own decision-making styles and the level of succession planning they have achieved.

Social implications

Library managers’ decision-making style can have an influence on how succession planning is carried out successfully at an academic library to ensure continuity of the library’s mission and vision.

Originality/value

This is the first known study to investigate how decision-making style of the manager influences each level of the succession planning at an academic library. The use of a systematic FA method for the qualitative data analysis reveals trustworthy results.

Details

Library Management, vol. 38 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Gregory Arnold Smith, Howard Dale Tryon and Lori Beth Snyder

– The purpose of this paper is to analyze the process of developing an academic library assessment plan and its relation to the furtherance of a culture of assessment.

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2449

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the process of developing an academic library assessment plan and its relation to the furtherance of a culture of assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative study of a university library’s assessment planning process; findings based on documentary evidence as well as an employee survey; analysis framed in relationship to relevant literature.

Findings

Planning for the future of assessment offered the Jerry Falwell Library a significant opportunity for organizational change. Evaluations of the planning process were mixed, but generally revealed evidence of conditions associated with the development of a culture of assessment. Participants saw planning as the product of both external and internal factors. The plan’s orientation toward value and impact, though clearly understood, was not universally appreciated. Implementation of the plan remains a substantial challenge.

Research limitations/implications

Reliability is subject to the limitations inherent to qualitative methods. Single case study design limits generalizability to different contexts.

Practical implications

The goal of developing a culture of assessment is not to be achieved easily or quickly. Library employees may be most inclined to support an assessment agenda when it is driven by internal factors such as quality improvement and the pursuit of efficiency and effectiveness.

Originality/value

The study emphasizes the process of developing an assessment plan at a university with a strong teaching mission. Additionally, it provides insight into the relationship between assessment planning and a culture of assessment.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2008

Zhixian Yi

The purpose of this paper is to examine academic library director and graduate student perceptions of knowledge management for library strategic planning, including its…

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5609

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine academic library director and graduate student perceptions of knowledge management for library strategic planning, including its definition and potential applications and benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple‐choice e‐mail survey was sent to 40 academic library directors and 19 graduate students of information and library science. Respondents were asked to define knowledge management for strategic planning and answer related questions on its potential applications and benefits. Respondents could also specify their own views on the subject.

Findings

There are minor differences in how library directors and graduate students define knowledge management. However, there is a disparity in how these two groups view potential applications and benefits of knowledge management for library strategic planning. Less than half of the directors (41.4 per cent) but the majority of students (77.8 per cent) believes that knowledge management is being applied to library strategic planning to create a portal for external information including links to library patron groups, research groups and publications. In addition, the majority of directors (75.8 per cent), but only half of the students (50.0 per cent) believe that knowledge management will improve the sharing of internal and external information.

Research limitations/implications

The number of participants in this e‐mail survey is limited in both size and location. Future research should include more participants from a wider area and examine more concrete issues.

Practical implications

This paper provides a useful overview of the perceptions of knowledge management, including its applications and potential benefits for library strategic planning.

Originality/value

Differing viewpoints between library directors and graduate students reflects the contrast between real‐world experience and academic applications. Acknowledging these differences is the first step toward ensuring that in the future, knowledge management is consistently and effectively applied to library strategic planning.

Details

Library Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Ana R. Pacios

An analysis of both form and content differences between the plans named “strategic” and those named “long‐range”. Planning theory is checked against the planning reports…

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5994

Abstract

An analysis of both form and content differences between the plans named “strategic” and those named “long‐range”. Planning theory is checked against the planning reports available on the Web pages of 65 public and university libraries. The goal is to see whether the differences that some theorists observe between strategic and long‐range planning actually exist on plans published with those names.

Details

Library Management, vol. 25 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Rob McGee

The purpose of this paper is to describe an approach to information technology (IT) strategic planning for libraries and institutions of higher education.

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4655

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an approach to information technology (IT) strategic planning for libraries and institutions of higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The “why, what, and how” of IT strategic planning for libraries is explained, to show the efficacy and value of long‐term IT planning and budgeting. The organization, design, processes, templates, and methodologies of IT strategic planning practices that have been proven and constantly refined through projects with academic, public, and national libraries are described.

Findings

Principles described for IT strategic planning as a team‐based enterprise learning process apply as well to the design and conduct of major IT procurements, where the organization also seeks best value IT outcomes for the long term. The approach is scalable with respect to the human resources and time required (e.g. three months, six months); the design and steps of the process; the methodologies employed; and the number, design, format, components, and contents of internal working documents and the published report(s).

Originality/value

IT strategic planning educates the institution about choices and consequences, decides on technology priorities and investments, makes informed decisions with confidence, and delivers consensus‐based outcomes and stakeholders' buy‐in.

Details

Library Management, vol. 27 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2015

William H. Weare

It has been widely projected in the library literature that a substantial number of librarians will retire in the near future leaving significant gaps in the workforce…

Abstract

It has been widely projected in the library literature that a substantial number of librarians will retire in the near future leaving significant gaps in the workforce, especially in library leadership. Many of those concerned with organizational development in libraries have promoted succession planning as an essential tool for addressing this much-anticipated wave of retirements. The purpose of this chapter is to argue that succession planning is the wrong approach for academic libraries. This chapter provides a review of the library literature on succession planning, as well as studies analyzing position announcements in librarianship which provide evidence as to the extent to which academic librarianship has changed in recent years. In a review of the library literature, the author found no sound explanation of why succession planning is an appropriate method for filling anticipated vacancies and no substantive evidence that succession planning programs in libraries are successful. Rather than filling anticipated vacancies with librarians prepared to fill specific positions by means of a succession planning program, the author recommends that academic library leaders should focus on the continual evaluation of current library needs and future library goals, and treat each vacancy as an opportunity to create a new position that will best satisfy the strategic goals of the library. In contrast to the nearly universal support for succession planning found in the library literature, this chapter offers a different point of view.

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Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2015

Jon E. Cawthorne

This research highlights the scenarios that might serve as a strategic vision to describe a future beyond the current library, one which both guides provosts and creates a…

Abstract

This research highlights the scenarios that might serve as a strategic vision to describe a future beyond the current library, one which both guides provosts and creates a map for the transformation of human resources and technology in the university research libraries. The scenarios offer managerial leaders an opportunity to envision new roles for librarians and staff which brings a much needed focus on the development of human resources as well as a thought-stream to understand decisions which effectively and systematically move the organization toward a strategic vision.

These scenarios also outline possible future directions research libraries could take by focusing on perspectives from library directors, provosts, and administrators for human resources. The four case study scenarios introduce potential future roles for librarians and highlight the unsustainability of the current scholarly communications model as well as uncertain factors related to the political, social, technical, and demographic issues facing campuses. Given the changes institutions face, scenarios allow directors to include more uncertainty when developing and articulating a vision. These scenarios may start a discussion, before a strategic planning process, to sharpen the evaluations and measures necessary to monitor achievements that define the value of the library.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-910-3

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