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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Yuanyuan Guo, Xin Wang and Chaoyou Wang

This study examines how the different dimensions of a privacy policy separately influence perceived effectiveness of privacy policy, as well as the mediating mechanisms…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines how the different dimensions of a privacy policy separately influence perceived effectiveness of privacy policy, as well as the mediating mechanisms behind these effects (i.e. vulnerability, benevolence). In addition, this study considers privacy concern as a significant moderator in the research model, to examine if the relative influences of privacy policy content are contingent upon levels of users' privacy concern.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey experiment was conducted to empirically validate the model. Specifically, three survey experiments and six scenarios were designed to manipulate high and low levels of the three privacy policy dimensions (i.e. transparency, control and protection). The authors totally distributed 450 copies of the questionnaire, of which 407 were valid.

Findings

This paper found that (1) all the three privacy policy dimensions directly influence perceived effectiveness of privacy policy; (2) all the three privacy policy dimensions indirectly influence perceived effectiveness of privacy policy by enhancing perceived corporate benevolence, whereas control also affects perceived effectiveness of privacy policy by reducing perceived vulnerability; and (3) individuals with high-privacy concern are much more impacted by privacy policy contents than individuals with low-privacy concern.

Practical implications

The findings could provide website managers with guidelines on how to design privacy policy contents by reducing user perceptions of vulnerability and enhancing user perceptions of corporate benevolence. The managers need to focus on customers' perceived vulnerability and corporate benevolence when launching or updating privacy policies. Furthermore, the managers also need to attend to users' privacy concerns, especially for multinational companies or companies with specific consumer groups.

Originality/value

This study extends the current privacy policy literature by articulating the separate influences of the three privacy policy dimensions and their impact mechanisms on perceived effectiveness of privacy policy. It also uncovers privacy concerns as a boundary condition that influence the effects of privacy policy contents on users' privacy perceptions.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2018

Jing Wang, Shanyong Wang, Yu Wang, Jun Li and Dingtao Zhao

This paper aims to explore the intention of consumers to visit green hotels in China through the theory of planned behavior (TPB) extended by adding perceived consumer

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the intention of consumers to visit green hotels in China through the theory of planned behavior (TPB) extended by adding perceived consumer effectiveness and environmental concern.

Design/methodology/approach

The TPB model is used as the basic theoretical framework but is extended by adding two critical variables. Data is collected from 324 respondents by using a self-administered questionnaire survey and analyzed with the assistance of structural equation modeling.

Findings

The empirical results show that perceived consumer effectiveness and environmental concern have positive effects on the attitude and the intention of consumers to visit green hotels, and that perceived consumer effectiveness has the largest effect. However, in China, the impact of environmental concern on the intention of consumers to visit green hotels is relatively limited, and the subjective norm has a strong effect. In addition, this research verifies the usefulness of the extended TPB model in understanding the intention of consumers in green hotels industry in China. This is evidenced by a comparison of the initial TPB model with the extended TPB model where the explanatory power has improved from 65 to 68 per cent.

Originality/value

This research contributes to TPB theory by addressing certain gaps in the literature regarding the intention of consumers to visit green hotels in China. Furthermore, considering the limitations of the TPB model, two pro-social variables, namely, perceived consumer effectiveness and environmental concern, are incorporated into the TPB model to better understand the intention of consumers to visit green hotels. Also, this research addresses the gap that studies on the role of perceived consumer effectiveness are limited in the tourism and hospitality management literature. The results indicate that perceived consumer effectiveness has the largest influence on the intention of consumers to visit green hotels.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Ingrid Laukeland Djupegot

Perceived effectiveness of nudging has been established as one of the most reliable predictors of acceptance of nudging. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how…

Abstract

Purpose

Perceived effectiveness of nudging has been established as one of the most reliable predictors of acceptance of nudging. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how source credibility and argument strength influence the perceived effectiveness of textual information about food-related nudging in order to provide a better understanding of how acceptance of nudging may be facilitated.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 × 2 scenario-based between-subjects factorial experiment with source credibility (high vs low) and argument strength (high vs low) as factors was applied. Data on respondents’ level of involvement in food-related behaviour were also collected.

Findings

Argument strength had a positive main effect on the perceived effectiveness of nudging, and there was a significant positive interaction effect of source credibility × argument strength on the perceived effectiveness of nudging.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper provide policy makers and other decision makers with a better understanding of how information about nudging should be communicated to consumers in order to facilitate acceptance.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to investigate how information about nudging should be communicated to consumers in order for nudging to be perceived as an effective and thus acceptable measure to influence food-related behaviour.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Ceren Ekebas-Turedi, Elika Kordrostami and Ilgım Dara Benoit

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of ad message framing (self-benefit vs other-benefit messages) and perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE) on green…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of ad message framing (self-benefit vs other-benefit messages) and perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE) on green advertising effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework was borrowed from self-congruity theory and was tested with two between-subject design experiments; PCE was measured in the first study and manipulated in the second.

Findings

The findings show that both measured and primed PCE (low vs high) moderate the impact of a green ad’s message framing on consumer responses (i.e. attitude toward the brand and purchase intention). Specifically, an other-benefit message is more effective when consumers perceive that their individual actions can positively influence environmental issues (high PCE). In contrast, a self-benefit message is more effective when consumers perceive that their individual actions might not be enough to influence environmental issues (low PCE). This research also shows that the influence of message framing on consumer responses is mediated by the perceived social responsibility of the company.

Practical implications

This paper offers an outline for designing effective ad campaigns for green products. Managers can determine or manipulate the PCE level of their target market and frame the message in their ad campaign accordingly, which will positively drive perceived social responsibility and, in turn, the ad campaign’s effectiveness.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to both the green advertising and self-congruity literature by showing the moderating effect of PCE on the effectiveness of message framing in green advertising.

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2020

Hannah L. Neumann, Luisa M. Martinez and Luis F. Martinez

This study aims to test for factors affecting environmental sustainability and purchase intention in the fashion industry. Accordingly, the authors developed a framework…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test for factors affecting environmental sustainability and purchase intention in the fashion industry. Accordingly, the authors developed a framework that depicts the relationships between perceptions of social responsibility, consumer attitude, trust, purchase intention and perceived consumer effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted with an internationally diverse sample of 216 consumers. Data were analysed using partial least squares structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results indicated that perceptions of social responsibility directly affect consumers’ attitudes towards these fashion brands, as well as trust and perceived consumer effectiveness. Also, consumers need to perceive sustainability efforts of these brands as altruistic, and trust was found to be a direct predictor of purchase intention. However, both consumer attitude and perceived consumer effectiveness did not predict purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

The survey was primarily distributed to young people. Therefore, a generalisation of the findings to other age groups might be limited.

Practical implications

Practicing managers should emphasise the fact that environmental sustainability and fast fashion brands could be sustainable to increase trust among consumers.

Social implications

When it comes to environmental issues, positive perceptions regarding the companies’ social responsibility efforts are vital to enhance both consumers’ trust towards the brands and their individual feeling of empowerment.

Originality/value

This study intends to shed light on the key elements that shape consumers’ attitudes and willingness to purchase green apparel.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Ilwoo Ju

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of consumers’ prescription drug advertising (DTCA) skepticism on their advertising evaluation. In addition, the study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of consumers’ prescription drug advertising (DTCA) skepticism on their advertising evaluation. In addition, the study investigates the moderating role of health risk information location in DTCA and the mediating role of perceived message effectiveness to address when and how the skepticism effects are maximized or minimized.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a controlled lab experiment to enhance internal validity.

Findings

This study found that when risk information was presented earlier in a more prominent manner, it appeared to reduce the DTCA skepticism effects. In contrast, the DTCA skepticism effects remained considerable when benefit information was presented earlier.

Research limitations/implications

The artificial nature of the controlled lab setting suggests conducting future research in a more natural setting using various therapeutic and product categories to enhance ecological and external validity.

Practical implications

Pharmaceutical marketers could reduce consumers’ DTCA skepticism effects on their advertising evaluation by using situational message strategies. The prominence of health risk disclosure could be one of such strategies.

Social implications

The FDA’s industry guidance for DTCA risk communication suggests that the location of risk information in the ad may play an important role in determining its prominence. However, little is known about how complying with the FDA’s risk communication guidance by presenting a more prominent risk disclosure can affect consumers’ ad evaluation by affecting the DTCA skepticism effects. The current study provides empirical evidence for the importance of the health risk disclosure prominence.

Originality/value

Because the FDA’s release of the DTCA risk communication guidance, little empirical research has been conducted to examine a wide range of situational message factors that may affect consumers’ response to DTCA risk communication. The current study filled the gap in the literature by addressing the interplay between consumer and message factors in the DTCA context.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Joshua D. Newton, Fiona J. Newton, Thomas Salzberger and Michael T. Ewing

Multiple environmental behaviors will need to be adopted if climate change is to be addressed, yet current environmental decision-making models explain the adoption of…

Abstract

Purpose

Multiple environmental behaviors will need to be adopted if climate change is to be addressed, yet current environmental decision-making models explain the adoption of single behaviors only. The purpose of this paper is to address this issue by developing and evaluating a decision-making model that explains the co-adoption, or coaction, of multiple environmental behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

To test its cross-national utility, the model was assessed separately among online survey panel respondents from three countries: Australia (n=502), the UK (n=500), and the USA (n=501). In total, three environmental behaviors were examined: sourcing electricity from a green energy provider, purchasing green products, and public transport use. For each behavioral pair, participants were grouped according to whether they had enacted coaction (performed both behaviors), some action (performed either behavior), or no action (performed neither behavior).

Findings

Irrespective of national sample and behavioral pair, those who engaged in coaction perceived greater personal benefits from reducing their CO2 emissions than those who enacted some action or no action. Moreover, perceived consumer effectiveness was typically greater among coaction participants than those in the no action group. Finally, perceived consumer effectiveness did not differ among those who had enacted coaction or some action.

Originality/value

The current findings suggest that personal benefits and perceived consumer effectiveness are important motivational antecedents for the decision to engage in environmental coaction. International commercial or social marketing campaigns aimed at encouraging the adoption of multiple environmental behaviors should therefore seek to leverage these motivational factors.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 32 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Sam Fullerton, Roger Brooksbank and Larry Neale

Marketers are increasingly spoilt for choice as to which emerging technology to use for the purpose of enhancing their company’s competitive advantage. Accordingly, there…

Abstract

Purpose

Marketers are increasingly spoilt for choice as to which emerging technology to use for the purpose of enhancing their company’s competitive advantage. Accordingly, there is an inherent need to assess, relative to the task of accomplishing an organization’s marketing goals, the levels of consumer-perceived effectiveness germane to these options. Based on grounded theory, this study aims to develop an appropriate measurement instrument.

Design/methodology/approach

Research is based on a survey featuring a cross-section of 18 technology-based initiatives that are being routinely incorporated within many companies’ marketing strategies. A sample of 967 adult residents of the USA provided their perspective on the effectiveness of each initiative as a mainstream marketing tool.

Findings

A wide spectrum of opinions exists as to what constitutes an effective initiative. Three sub-dimensions of the consumer-perceived effectiveness construct were identified and validated as measurement scales for use in future research: involvement stealth and outreach.

Research limitations/implications

The generalization of the findings may be limited because minority segments of the adult American population, specifically, African Americans and Asian Americans were somewhat under-represented in the sample. Likewise, younger and older segments were slightly under- and over-represented, respectively.

Practical implications

The study findings can be used to aid in the further development of an instrument designed to measure the strength and directionality of consumer-perceived marketing effectiveness. With the specter of an increasing array of technology-based strategic options going forward, using such an instrument will no doubt become a critically important success factor among business-to-customer (B2C) organizations.

Originality/value

Few studies to date have sought to understand consumer perspectives regarding the effectiveness of technology-based initiatives as marketing tools, and none have explored the relativities of such perceptions across an array of different initiatives or examined any latent sub-dimensions of the construct. This study addresses these deficiencies.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

James E. Littlefield, Yeqing Bao and Don L. Cook

Many writers assume that consumers’ use of the Internet will follow the development of Web sites by Realtor.com and other Realtor‐sponsored sites on the Internet. This…

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Abstract

Many writers assume that consumers’ use of the Internet will follow the development of Web sites by Realtor.com and other Realtor‐sponsored sites on the Internet. This study examined this proposition by surveying consumers’ Internet use in their home purchases. A model of consumers’ Internet use in home purchases is developed and tested. Results showed that fewer than 40 percent of the home purchasers ever used the Internet for real estate related information during their home purchases. Awareness of Internet real estate information, access to Internet, age, perceived effectiveness of Internet in home purchase, and satisfaction with Realtor are found to be important factors in determining consumers’ use of Internet during home purchases.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Rui Qi and Han Chen

Applying the value creation of corporate social responsibility (CSR), this study aims to investigate the direct effect of preventive measures in the postpandemic world on…

Abstract

Purpose

Applying the value creation of corporate social responsibility (CSR), this study aims to investigate the direct effect of preventive measures in the postpandemic world on Airbnb consumers’ attitudes toward the host, which may further impact their behavioral intentions. It also examined the mediating role of perceived risk and perceived motives, as well as the moderating role of message strategies and risk tolerance in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (preventive measures: basic versus enhanced) × 2 (message strategies: promotional social cause message [PSC] versus partake-in-our-cause message [PIOC]) between-subjects factorial design was conducted with a sample of 476 US Airbnb consumers through an online survey. PROCESS macro was used for hypothesis testing.

Findings

Results demonstrated that enhanced preventive measures had more positive impact on Airbnb consumers’ attitudes toward the host, which was positively related to positive word of mouth and booking intention. Perceived risk and perceived motives mediated the relationship between preventive measures and attitude toward Airbnb hosts. Positive relationships between attitude toward the host and behavioral intentions were strengthened when PIOC was used than PSC. The negative relationship between preventive measures and perceived risk was enhanced when PIOC was used than PSC. Risk tolerance did not interact with messages strategy to impact the relationship between preventive measures and perceived risk.

Originality/value

The study uncovered the mechanisms by which consumers form their responses toward different safety information of Airbnb accommodations postpandemic and the role of message strategies in the process. It provided implications for the Airbnb platform and hosts in the postpandemic period.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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