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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2022

Giulio Pedrini

This paper investigates the relationship between labour hoarding practices and training investments during severe economic downturns focusing on the case of Italy during…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the relationship between labour hoarding practices and training investments during severe economic downturns focusing on the case of Italy during the Great Recession.

Design/methodology/approach

Data come from the 2010 Italian wave of Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS). Econometric estimates plug a proxy of labour hoarding into the probability function that firms provide either off-the-job or on-the-job training. A bivariate selectivity probit model is also used for robustness sake.

Findings

Results show that labour hoarding should not be considered as an enhancer of training investments when considered as a standing-alone practice in presence of severe and deep economic downturn. However, labour hoarding does not penalize off-the-job training investments if it occurs in an innovative firm or in a firm that perceive specific skill requirements in the workforce during the recessionary period.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the debate on the role of labour hoarding during severe recessions by showing that it cannot be functional to re-oriented firms’ investments aimed at upskilling their workforce. It is only compatible with new training courses that accompany the workforce across a technological transition. Policy implications deals with the suitability of job retention schemes or state-financed furlough during recessions, as occurred during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Jinqi Jiang, Guangsheng Zhang, Diming Qi and Mi Zhou

Whether training contributes to stabilizing employment among rural migrant workers in cities remains unclear. Based on this gap in the research, the purpose of this paper…

1165

Abstract

Purpose

Whether training contributes to stabilizing employment among rural migrant workers in cities remains unclear. Based on this gap in the research, the purpose of this paper is to examine how on-the-job training affects rural migrant workers’ job mobility in China.

Design/methodology/approach

By using randomly sampled survey data on migrant workers in Liaoning province in 2014, the authors applied a logistic model and survival analysis to explore the effect of on-the-job training on migrant workers’ job turnover and understand workers’ job change behaviour after receiving on-the-job training.

Findings

The results showed that job training provided by employers can significantly reduce migrant workers’ turnover by increasing specific human capital. By contrast, training provided by the government or migrant workers themselves focuses on increasing general human capital and thus fails to reduce job turnover. Moreover, further discussion revealed that, in the trained group, those people with a short tenure and low wage in the first job, people without any skills before migration, male migrant workers, and people that work in medium-sized and large cities have a higher probability of changing jobs. These findings suggest that to tackle the high rate of job mobility among rural migrant workers, firms should entice this labour to train by adjusting their internal training mechanisms, and local governments should subsidize firms that provide on-the-job training for rural migrant workers to help share the costs and risks of training. Moreover, for sake of reducing job changing among those trained workers, firms even should take actions to protect their labour rights of migrant workers and to ensure that they receive equal treatment to their urban counterparts.

Originality/value

This paper makes three contributions to the field of job mobility in China. First, it explores the mechanism between on-the-job training and rural migrant workers’ job mobility. Second, it empirically analyses the effect of on-the-job training on migrant workers’ job mobility as well as the different effects of general and specific training. Lastly, its results have important policy implications for the employment stability of rural migrant workers.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Boreum Ju and Jessica Li

The purpose of this study is to explore how training, job tenure and education-job and skills-job matches impact employees’ turnover intention by using a representative…

2780

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how training, job tenure and education-job and skills-job matches impact employees’ turnover intention by using a representative national sample from the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study in which 1,531 individuals were followed from 2003 to 2014.

Design/methodology/approach

A hierarchical-regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationships among training, job tenure, education-job match, skills-job match and turnover intention. This analysis focused on 12 year-to-year time points from 2003 to 2014 (one for each year), and the data were measured for each individual.

Findings

The results from the hierarchical-regression analysis supported the hypotheses that on-the-job training, off-the-job training, distance training, job tenure and education-job and skills-job matches are significantly associated with turnover intention.

Originality/value

The findings of this study, based on human capital theory and firm-specific human capital theory, contribute to an understanding of how training and the education-job and skills-job matches may impact turnover intention in a non-Western context. It also provides a longitudinal perspective of the impact of training on employee turnover intention to inform human resource development professionals when planning employee training.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 43 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Jan A. DeJong

Suggests that structured on‐the‐job training, offered to operatorsin most divisions of the Dutch steel giant Hoogovens IJmuiden, has ledto a more complete understanding of…

Abstract

Suggests that structured on‐the‐job training, offered to operators in most divisions of the Dutch steel giant Hoogovens IJmuiden, has led to a more complete understanding of the chemical and mechanical processes involved, and a shorter induction period. Presents a case study of the way two groups of employees in the company are being trained for their jobs. Part of the training takes place on the job and part of it in an off‐the‐job course, and handbooks are found to play a major role in the actual training process. Documents were studied, and trainees, instructors, supervisors and training co‐ordinators were interviewed to find out if the training is effective on the shopfloor.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Sergey Roshchin and Pavel Travkin

This paper aims to determine the influence of various enterprise characteristics on on-the-job training. The paper focuses mainly on identifying the influence of a firm’s…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the influence of various enterprise characteristics on on-the-job training. The paper focuses mainly on identifying the influence of a firm’s innovative activity, technological capacity for manufacturing and product market competition on its likelihood of having a training program and on training intensity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors administered a firm-level survey to a sample of 2,000 Russian enterprises. This survey includes questions about on-the-job training and key information about the companies’ activities. Probit and ordered probit estimates are used in the statistical analyses.

Findings

The results indicate that an enterprise’s provision of training is determined largely by firm-specific factors, such as its innovative activity, technical and technological state of manufacturing and product market competition. The authors adopt two widely used measures of training: incidence and intensity. Innovative activity and the technical and technological state of manufacturing are decisive factors in explaining a firm’s provision of training, as they have a strictly positive effect on both the incidence and the intensity of training. Product market competition has a positive effect on the incidence of training and a negative effect on the intensity of training.

Originality/value

This paper is original because it assumes that the process of deciding whether to implement a training program at an enterprise and the corresponding proportion of employees involved in training is built on the presupposition that the training intensity decision is made in two stages. This paper is the first to present estimates of on-the-job training intensity based on data from Russian enterprises.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1981

Paul Bolino

Economists have known for some time that increases in the amounts of capital and labour cannot explain all of the growth of output (Kendrick, 1961, 1976). Schultz showed…

Abstract

Economists have known for some time that increases in the amounts of capital and labour cannot explain all of the growth of output (Kendrick, 1961, 1976). Schultz showed the potential importance of human resource development in explaining this residual when he made estimates of investments in education for the period 1900 to 1957. He stated that educational capital was clearly an important element in production and that it had risen at a much faster rate than reproducible non‐human wealth (Schultz, 1960, 1962).

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 8 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2017

Maria Ferreira, Annemarie Künn-Nelen and Andries De Grip

This paper provides more insight into the assumption of human capital theory that the productivity of job-related training is driven by the improvement of workers’ skills…

Abstract

This paper provides more insight into the assumption of human capital theory that the productivity of job-related training is driven by the improvement of workers’ skills. We analyze the extent to which training and informal learning on the job are related to employee skill development and consider the heterogeneity of this relationship with respect to workers’ skill mismatch at job entry. Using data from the 2014 European Skills and Jobs Survey, we find – as assumed by human capital theory – that employees who participated in training or informal learning show greater improvement of their skills than those who did not. The contribution of informal learning to employee skill development appears to be larger than that of training participation. Nevertheless, both forms of learning are shown to be complementary. This complementarity between training and informal learning is related to a significant additional improvement of workers’ skills. The skill development of workers who were initially underskilled for their job seems to benefit the most from both training and informal learning, whereas the skill development of those who were initially overskilled benefits the least. Work-related learning investments in the latter group seem to be more functional in offsetting skill depreciation than in fostering skill accumulation.

Details

Skill Mismatch in Labor Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-377-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Inka Koskela and Hannele Palukka

This paper aims to identify methods of guidance and supervision used in air traffic control training. It also aims to show how these methods facilitate trainee…

2963

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify methods of guidance and supervision used in air traffic control training. It also aims to show how these methods facilitate trainee participation in core work activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies the tools of conversation analysis and ethnomethodology to explore the ways in which trainers and trainees act and interact in training situations. The data consist of the video recordings (total 38 hours) and ethnographic material gathered at a vocational institute for aviation and in two aerodrome control tower units.

Findings

The trainers used five different instructional strategies with which they guided and controlled the trainees' actions. In simulator training, learning was structured as a process through which the procedural knowledge possessed by the expert controllers was transferred to the trainees through interventions such as orders, test questions and additions. As the trainees progressed to the on‐the‐job training phase, interaction evolved from being trainer‐driven to trainer‐guided. The trainees' performance was fine‐tuned and guided towards local practices of particular work position by means of instructions and information deliveries.

Practical implications

The simulator training and on‐the‐job training appear as two distinctive forms of vocational training with their own aims. In order to improve the quality of the training, it is suggested that greater attention should be given to the ways in which these two separate areas of learning could be better reconciled.

Originality/value

This ethnomethodological study on training interaction complements the understanding of instructional strategies used at different stages of air traffic control training. It is proposed that research into the local and social production of training interaction can shed useful light on the complexities of workplace learning and training interaction, providing a novel perspective for those engaged in practice of vocational education.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2022

Mensah Prince Osiesi, Victor Tobiloba Odobe, Kamorudeen Taiwo Sanni, Adijat Bolanle Adams, Chigozie Celestina Oke, Udukhomose Suleiman Omokhabi and Nnaemeka Chijioke Okorie

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of professional training and development for librarians/library staff in the southwest, Nigeria; especially the Federal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of professional training and development for librarians/library staff in the southwest, Nigeria; especially the Federal University of OyeEkiti, Nigeria. Thus, this study intends to assess the impact of staff professional development and training on the job performance of library staff in the Federal University Oye Ekiti, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The descriptive survey research design was used in carrying out this study. The population of study cuts across all library staff/attendants in the Federal University Oye Ekiti departmental, faculty and the university libraries. The purposive sampling technique was used in selecting the sample for the study (77 library staff). Research instruments, developed by the researchers, Staff Development Programme Questionnaire (r = 0.79), Staff performance Questionnaire (r = 0.81), Challenges of Staff Professional Development and Training Questionnaire (r = 0.82), were used for data collection. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics (frequency counts and percentages, mean and standard deviation) and inference statistics (correlation and one-way ANOVA) at a 5% level of significance.

Findings

Results revealed that the level of the job performance of library staff in Federal University Oye-Ekiti (FUOYE) is high; there is a positive and statistically significant relationship between the professional development of library staff and their performance in the job; professional development and training of library staff significantly impact their job performance; orientation, in-house training, seminars, on-the-job training and instructor-led training.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to the university libraries in the Federal University Oye Ekiti, Nigeria. The variables used in this study were restricted to training and development of library staff and job performance of librarians in FUOYE, and professional development programmes available for FUOYE librarians.

Practical implications

Other forms of professional development programmes such as Distance Educational Programmes, Conferences/Workshops, Study visits, Formal professional library education and TETFUND Programmes should be made available for university library staff. Universities should always organise staff professional development programmes; since it enhances the job performance of library staff.

Originality/value

This article is original and has not been published elsewhere.

Details

Library Management, vol. 43 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

James L. Price

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool…

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Abstract

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool, seeks to improve measurement in the study of work organizations and to facilitate the teaching of introductory courses in this subject. Focuses solely on work organizations, that is, social systems in which members work for money. Defines measurement and distinguishes four levels: nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio. Selects specific measures on the basis of quality, diversity, simplicity and availability and evaluates each measure for its validity and reliability. Employs a set of 38 concepts ‐ ranging from “absenteeism” to “turnover” as the handbook’s frame of reference. Concludes by reviewing organizational measurement over the past 30 years and recommending future measurement reseach.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 18 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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