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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Australia, as well as several European countries, is being invited to participate in the Mirage F1 development to be called the Mirage F1‐M53 with maiden flight scheduled…

Abstract

Australia, as well as several European countries, is being invited to participate in the Mirage F1 development to be called the Mirage F1‐M53 with maiden flight scheduled for the end of this year. The F1‐M53 will have an increased span at 8·45m of 0·03m, length at 15·23m of 0·10m and engine thrust, without afterburner, of 5,500kg, an extra 500kg. Ramp weight in smooth configuration will be reduced by 20kg to 11,210kg, maximum take‐off weight, with 4 tons of outside load and the internal fuel capacity will both remain the same. Then with only slight differences, performance will be improved considerably, for instance the ceiling improved by 4,000ft and the rate of climb, at a constant mach 0·9 figure, improved by 2,000ft/min. Then the take‐off run will be 400ft shorter and the ferry flight range improved by 2,500 nautical miles. Carrying four 1,000lb bombs and tanks, the Hi‐lo‐hi mission can be executed over an additional 65 nautical miles.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1973

Airliners carrying between 800 and 1,000 passengers, weighing between 1m and 1.5m lb at take‐off may become a reality after 1980, according to Gordon Sim, director of…

Abstract

Airliners carrying between 800 and 1,000 passengers, weighing between 1m and 1.5m lb at take‐off may become a reality after 1980, according to Gordon Sim, director of science and engineering at Lockheed‐California Co. His prediction is based on a Lockheed study forecasting air passenger traffic growing at 11.4 per cent through the 1970's, 9.1 per cent through the 1980's and 66 per cent in the 1990's. While he believes aircraft technology is available to build this size airliner, producing an engine with the necessary thrust of about 90,0001b for a four engined aircraft may not be so easy, specially when taking into account noise levels. Mr Sim sees little significant penetration of V/TOL or S/TOL aircraft into the market before 1980 due to slow growth. Even then the relatively high operating costs would be rivalled by conventional wide‐bodied aircraft which will be designed with more advanced high‐lift systems for reduced take‐off and landing.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1981

TERRY FORD

Evident at the Show were technological developments both in the new aircraft and equipment displayed, in the very advanced systems being incorporated in types that are due…

Abstract

Evident at the Show were technological developments both in the new aircraft and equipment displayed, in the very advanced systems being incorporated in types that are due to make their first flight shortly, and in the activity projected by many companies to take advantage of current progress in avionics. At the same time, the state‐of‐the‐art of a large programme such as the Space Shuttle was amply demonstrated both in the US Pavilion and on the various manufacturer's stands.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1979

The Paris/Le Bourget International Air and Space Show is the world's oldest international show and is of considerable importance. It will have 548 exhibitors from 23…

Abstract

The Paris/Le Bourget International Air and Space Show is the world's oldest international show and is of considerable importance. It will have 548 exhibitors from 23 countries and there will be 165,000 square metres of display area — with 10,000 square metres for the out‐door static exhibits. The numbers of chalets is to be increased by 55.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 51 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 22 January 2019

Jalal Fathi Sola, Farhad Alinejad, Foad Rahimidehgolan and Amirreza Niazmand

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the fatigue life of the crankshaft in an engine with increased horsepower.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the fatigue life of the crankshaft in an engine with increased horsepower.

Design/methodology/approach

The applied load on the powertrain components was calculated through a dynamic analysis. Then, to estimate the induced stress in every crank angle, the calculated loads in different engine speeds were applied on the crankshaft. Finally, the critical plane fatigue theories in addition to URM standard were used to estimate the damage and fatigue life of the crankshaft with the increased power.

Findings

It was found that a simultaneous increase of gas pressure and engine speed by 30 percent will cause an increase of maximum applied load on the crankshaft by 25 percent. It was also found that while the results of finite element (FE) method predict an infinite life for the crankshaft after increasing the power, the URM method predicts an engine failure for the increased power application. In this study, the crankpin fillet is introduced as the most critical area of the crankshaft.

Originality/value

Increasing the power of the internal combustion engines without changing its main components has been of high interest; however, the failure associated with the increased load as the result of increased power has been a big challenge for that purpose. Moreover, although URM standard provided an efficient practice to evaluate a crankshaft fatigue life, using FE analysis may provide more reliability.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

148

Abstract

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 78 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Katarzyna Gadomska-Lila

Demographic changes and consequent diversification of teams of employees in organisations require us to change one’s approach to managing human resources and to search for…

1328

Abstract

Purpose

Demographic changes and consequent diversification of teams of employees in organisations require us to change one’s approach to managing human resources and to search for new methods adjusted to contemporary challenges. One of such methods is reverse mentoring. It is a new form of mentoring where the younger employee is the mentor sharing expertise with the older employee. The purpose of this article is to identify advantages that reverse mentoring offers individuals who participate in the mentoring relationship – the younger mentor and the older mentee, and the entire organisation, as well as to identify conditions conducive to revealing desired advantages.

Design/methodology/approach

The article presents results of empirical research conducted based on the qualitative method and semi-structured individual interviews. The research focussed on five pairs from five different organisations operating in Poland who applied reverse mentoring as well as managers or human resources managers of these enterprises.

Findings

Research results show that reverse mentoring may offer numerous advantages to both individuals engaged in the relation (the mentor and the mentee) and the entire organisation. Thus, reverse mentoring seems to be an efficient tool for sharing knowledge, creating engagement, developing leadership and, first and foremost, building intergenerational relations based on mutual acceptance. Conclusions drawn from the research show that efficacy of reverse mentoring depends on the level of engagement in the mentor/mentee relation and the level of organisational support – engagement of the officers, supportive organisational culture and atmosphere conductive to cooperation.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of the research is the fact that reverse mentoring is not common in Polish organisations, thus the number of the interviews is limited. Furthermore, the data were collected from companies operating in Poland and they refer to one cultural circle. Another limitation is closely connected with the nature of qualitative research, as the research findings may be influenced by the personal perspective of participants.

Practical implications

The paper helps managers to build intergenerational relations. It encourages the use of reverse mentoring by emphasising its various benefits. It also specifies the conditions which need to be taken into consideration in order to increase the chances of enjoying the benefits, especially the necessity to prepare individual development plans adjusted to the needs and expectations of participants, proper selection of pairs for the mentoring relation and sufficient preparation of each party to the relation. This knowledge may be used by practitioners of managing human resources to develop organisational support for mentoring programmes.

Social implications

The paper presents reverse mentoring as an opportunity for intergenerational knowledge sharing and developing intergenerational cooperation.

Originality/value

The results of the research extend the knowledge in the area of applying reverse mentoring to create intergenerational relationships. So far, this subject has received limited attention in the literature. Since reverse mentoring is not a widespread method, and research in this area is relatively rare, the value of the paper is to fill the gaps in this subject.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1976

T.E. Ford

Making their first Farnborough appearance were two Grumman types among the many international newcomers. The E‐2C Hawkeye was in the static park equipped with five tons of…

Abstract

Making their first Farnborough appearance were two Grumman types among the many international newcomers. The E‐2C Hawkeye was in the static park equipped with five tons of electronic equipment that is capable of simultaneously detecting hundreds of targets over land or sea and guiding interceptors on to these targets. The Grumman F‐14A Tomcat two seat swing‐wing carrier‐based air superiority fighter gave daily flight demonstrations which hinted at its versatility. It is equipped with the AW‐9 weapons control system which is claimed to have exceptional detection ranges, standoff firing capabilities and attack modes. The Tomcat and Hawkeye are complementary and this capability was emphasised by the manufacturers, since both are in service with the US Navy and operate as a team with a high security voice and data communications system.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 48 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1979

This is an impression of the Paris Salon de l'Aeronautique drawn from visits during the first three days: a more detailed report on the exhibits and the flying displays…

Abstract

This is an impression of the Paris Salon de l'Aeronautique drawn from visits during the first three days: a more detailed report on the exhibits and the flying displays, together with “An Engineer's Impression of the Paris Air Show” will appear in our next issue.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 51 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1987

EUROPEAN aerospace was well to the fore at the Show, with first appearances of the A320, Fokker 100 and BAe 146–300. Few large US aircraft were present although the…

Abstract

EUROPEAN aerospace was well to the fore at the Show, with first appearances of the A320, Fokker 100 and BAe 146–300. Few large US aircraft were present although the executive jet market was well represented with products from both sides of the Atlantic. Potential developments were featured in many areas, all of which should be realised in the next few years. Progress of the flight trials of the Airbus Industrie A320 was detailed with three of the four aircraft in the programme now flying. The first of these is exploring all the critical flight conditions. The normal operating envelope was covered on the first flight; from 80 knots to 381 knots/0.89 M and a cg range up to 46% aft cg. Handling qualities have now been explored over the full flight envelope, with the protection devices working as predicted and buffet limits better than forecast. Major tasks have included stall identification and handling qualities at aft cg as well as flutter tests with and without the load alleviation function. The second A320 has the primary tasks of dealing with the development and checking of the systems, emphasis on the third is placed on flight control and computing and the fourth aircraft will be undertaking performance trials.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 59 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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